158

I am iterating over a list and I want to print out the index of the item if it meets a certain condition. How would I do this?

Example:

testlist = [1,2,3,5,3,1,2,1,6]
for item in testlist:
    if item == 1:
        print position

11 Answers 11

268

Hmmm. There was an answer with a list comprehension here, but it's disappeared.

Here:

 [i for i,x in enumerate(testlist) if x == 1]

Example:

>>> testlist
[1, 2, 3, 5, 3, 1, 2, 1, 6]
>>> [i for i,x in enumerate(testlist) if x == 1]
[0, 5, 7]

Update:

Okay, you want a generator expression, we'll have a generator expression. Here's the list comprehension again, in a for loop:

>>> for i in [i for i,x in enumerate(testlist) if x == 1]:
...     print i
... 
0
5
7

Now we'll construct a generator...

>>> (i for i,x in enumerate(testlist) if x == 1)
<generator object at 0x6b508>
>>> for i in (i for i,x in enumerate(testlist) if x == 1):
...     print i
... 
0
5
7

and niftily enough, we can assign that to a variable, and use it from there...

>>> gen = (i for i,x in enumerate(testlist) if x == 1)
>>> for i in gen: print i
... 
0
5
7

And to think I used to write FORTRAN.

  • 5
    After probably 25 years of questioning functional programming, I think I'm finally getting the clue. list comprehension is da bomb. – Charlie Martin Dec 13 '08 at 18:30
  • 15
    I presume you mean "single letter" and frankly, a longer name in this example would have no more information content. – Charlie Martin Dec 1 '10 at 19:28
  • 2
    Thanks for great answer. I think @nailer's comment might relate to the fact that you use 'i' in two different contexts in a single line in the generator example; one inside the comprehension, and the other to iterate through it. I know it threw me off for a second. – Brown May 3 '13 at 14:34
  • 1
    @CharlieMartin You use 'i' for the index rather than the item per the one common convention for single character variables. Naming the index 'index' and the item 'item' would remove ambiguity. Additionally you're replying to a parent that used 'item' and 'position' and it's good manners not to unnecessarily rename parts of the original code in your answer. – mikemaccana May 3 '13 at 14:54
  • 1
    Super syntax :o) You can easily get a command line parameter. Let there is an array of arguments: args = ['x', '-p1', 'v1', '-p2', 'v2']. Then the command args[[i for i, x in enumerate(args) if x == '-p1'][0] + 1] returns 'v1' – Tomáš K. Aug 15 '14 at 11:20
156

What about the following?

print testlist.index(element)

If you are not sure whether the element to look for is actually in the list, you can add a preliminary check, like

if element in testlist:
    print testlist.index(element)

or

print(testlist.index(element) if element in testlist else None)

or the "pythonic way", which I don't like so much because code is less clear, but sometimes is more efficient,

try:
    print testlist.index(element)
except ValueError:
    pass
  • 5
    instead of testing before accessing, you could also just try and check for ValueError – kratenko Aug 18 '13 at 20:45
  • I think that he wants for find all occurrences, you seem to give only the first one. – tfv Oct 5 '17 at 8:32
  • @tfv I don't see how you can come to such conclusion since the question says "item" and not "items". – mmj Oct 8 '17 at 21:53
40

Use enumerate:

testlist = [1,2,3,5,3,1,2,1,6]
for position, item in enumerate(testlist):
    if item == 1:
        print position
10
for i in xrange(len(testlist)):
  if testlist[i] == 1:
    print i

xrange instead of range as requested (see comments).

  • replace range() with xrange() -- range() creates a list, xrange() creates a iterator. xrange() uses waaaay less memory, and the inital call is faster. – gnud Dec 13 '08 at 1:39
  • 2
    I agree for large lists in python 2 programs. Note that 'range' will still work in python 3 though (and work like xrange IIRC). 'xrange' is going the way of the dinosaurs. – jakber Dec 13 '08 at 1:44
  • 1
    Update: xrange is depracted in Python 3.x, as the new range is the old xrange – tim-oh Mar 13 '17 at 12:51
4

Here is another way to do this:

try:
   id = testlist.index('1')
   print testlist[id]
except ValueError:
   print "Not Found"
3
[x for x in range(len(testlist)) if testlist[x]==1]
1

If your list got large enough and you only expected to find the value in a sparse number of indices, consider that this code could execute much faster because you don't have to iterate every value in the list.

lookingFor = 1
i = 0
index = 0
try:
  while i < len(testlist):
    index = testlist.index(lookingFor,i)
    i = index + 1
    print index
except ValueError: #testlist.index() cannot find lookingFor
  pass

If you expect to find the value a lot you should probably just append "index" to a list and print the list at the end to save time per iteration.

  • I did some timing tests. The list comprehension technique runs 38% faster than this code. (I replaced your print statement with a outputlist.append call) – Deestan Dec 13 '08 at 16:31
  • I also did some tests with list sizes of 100000 random values between 1 and 100. The code I wrote was in some cases twice as fast. No time testing is comparable to poster's application (they must test themselves to be sure, of course). I apologize if my opinion was detrimental to this post. – user44484 Dec 13 '08 at 17:05
1

Try the below:

testlist = [1,2,3,5,3,1,2,1,6]    
position=0
for i in testlist:
   if i == 1:
      print(position)
   position=position+1
0

I think that it might be useful to use the curselection() method from thte Tkinter library:

from Tkinter import * 
listbox.curselection()

This method works on Tkinter listbox widgets, so you'll need to construct one of them instead of a list.

This will return a position like this:

('0',) (although later versions of Tkinter may return a list of ints instead)

Which is for the first position and the number will change according to the item position.

For more information, see this page: http://effbot.org/tkinterbook/listbox.htm

Greetings.

  • 1
    Interesting idea. Since this requires importing the entire Tkinter library, though, it's not the most efficient way to solve the problem. – seaotternerd Jun 20 '13 at 22:47
  • 3
    This is such an inefficient and meandering path that I'd say it's a wrong answer, even if it somewhat addresses the question. – user559633 Nov 9 '13 at 20:48
  • This answer has nothing to do with the question. – Cody Piersall Aug 22 '14 at 13:42
0

Why complicate things?

testlist = [1,2,3,5,3,1,2,1,6]
for position, item in enumerate(testlist):
    if item == 1:
        print position
-2
testlist = [1,2,3,5,3,1,2,1,6]
for id, value in enumerate(testlist):
    if id == 1:
        print testlist[id]

I guess that it's exacly what you want. ;-) 'id' will be always the index of the values on the list.

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