When creating new tables and a user to go along with it I usually just invoke the following commands:

create database mydb;
grant all privileges on mydb.* to myuser@localhost identified by "mypassword";

I have never ever needed to utilize the flush privileges command after issuing the previous two commands. Users can log in and use their database and run PHP scripts which connect to the database just fine. Yet I see this command used in almost every tutorial I look at. When is the flush privileges command really needed and when is it unnecessary?

  • 1
    It's a good thing to try when stuff doesn't work, but I haven't seen it as a necessary thing since at least MySQL 5.0. – tadman Apr 6 '16 at 23:16
  • mytable.* uses mytable as a database name, not a table name. – Barmar Apr 6 '16 at 23:31
  • @Barmar Thankyou, I mistyped my code. It is fixed now. – kojow7 Apr 7 '16 at 0:48
up vote 26 down vote accepted

Privileges assigned through GRANT option do not need FLUSH PRIVILEGES to take effect - MySQL server will notice these changes and reload the grant tables immediately.

From MySQL documentation:

If you modify the grant tables directly using statements such as INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE, your changes have no effect on privilege checking until you either restart the server or tell it to reload the tables. If you change the grant tables directly but forget to reload them, your changes have no effect until you restart the server. This may leave you wondering why your changes seem to make no difference!

To tell the server to reload the grant tables, perform a flush-privileges operation. This can be done by issuing a FLUSH PRIVILEGES statement or by executing a mysqladmin flush-privileges or mysqladmin reload command.

If you modify the grant tables indirectly using account-management statements such as GRANT, REVOKE, SET PASSWORD, or RENAME USER, the server notices these changes and loads the grant tables into memory again immediately.

  • 2
    Thanks, though I wonder why so many tutorials specifically say you need to use flush privileges after a GRANT command. – kojow7 Apr 7 '16 at 0:51
  • Can you please advise on the command to use, when i write flush privileges nothing happens – Ilan Mar 30 at 13:23
  • @kojow7 I don't have any hard facts backing this, but I believe that back in the 3.23:ish days of MySQL, it was in fact necessary. So that's probably why it's left in the documentation as a remnant of "how it used to be". – Per Lundberg Aug 2 at 12:10

TL;TR

You should use FLUSH PRIVILEGES; only if you modify the grant tables directly using statements such as INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE.

See: Stop using FLUSH PRIVILEGES

  • 1
    Nice and concise. – kiwicomb123 Nov 14 '17 at 14:47

Just to give some examples. Let's say you modify the password for an user called 'alex'. You can modify this password in several ways. For instance:

mysql> update* user set password=PASSWORD('test!23') where user='alex'; 
mysql> flush privileges;

Here you used UPDATE. If you use INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE on grant tables directly you need use FLUSH PRIVILEGES in order to reload the grant tables.

Or you can modify the password like this:

mysql> set password for 'alex'@'localhost'= password('test!24');

Here it's not necesary to use "FLUSH PRIVILEGES;" If you modify the grant tables indirectly using account-management statements such as GRANT, REVOKE, SET PASSWORD, or RENAME USER, the server notices these changes and loads the grant tables into memory again immediately.

  • Thank you for a concrete example. – kojow7 Jun 26 '17 at 15:39

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