7
struct A
{
    int a   = 1;
    short b = 2;
    char c  = 3;
}

struct B
{
    using arr_type = array<A,3>;
    char asd = 0;
    A a1;  
    A a2;
    A a3;

    // is this safe to use to loop trough all 3 elements?
    arr_type* p1 = reinterpret_cast<arr_type*>(&a1);

    // or maybe this one?
    A* p2 = &a1;
};

Can I safely use p1 or p2 to loop from a1...a3 ?

B b;

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
     cout << p1[i];
     cout << p2[i];
}

The reason why it's not a simple array is because I want each "item" to have a proper name.

I could instead use the union approach, but the C++ prohibits anonymous structs (altho this is not a problem for me since MSVC supports this and GCC seems to support it as well);

union E
{
    A arr[3];
    struct {
        A a1;
        A a2;
        A a3;
    };
};

And the following is clearly safe, but it has a 4 byte overhead for each reference. Which I don't like. (Plus the cost to initialize the references..)

struct B
{
    char asd;
    A arr[3];  
    A& a1 = arr[0];
    A& a2 = arr[1];
    A& a3 = arr[2];
};

And this one has no overhead but for my very specific case, it's not good enough.

struct B
{
    char asd;
    A arr[3];  
    A& a1() { return arr[0] };
    A& a2() { return arr[1] };
    A& a3() { return arr[2] };
};

I'm gonna be using those a1, a2, a3 names very often, and it's harder to debug them if they are function calls in visual studio. And again, I'm going to be using those fields a lot, so I want to be able to check their values easily.

10
  • To get an actual, useful answer you might want to explain what you are trying to do.
    – user657267
    Apr 7, 2016 at 4:48
  • Why not have A& a1() { return arr[0]; } / const A& a1() const { return arr[0]; } etc..? Lets you refer to the array entries using your presumably-meaningful "a1", "a2" names, but without the potential storage overhead of references, and it will all be optimised away at even the lower optimisation settings. Apr 7, 2016 at 4:51
  • @TonyD Forgot to include that.
    – Gam
    Apr 7, 2016 at 4:54
  • "I just dont want to use it" isn't very useful - if you say why don't you want to use it, that gives some criterion for "better" that might lead to other answers... Apr 7, 2016 at 4:57
  • @TonyD I've added an explanation.
    – Gam
    Apr 7, 2016 at 5:05

2 Answers 2

7
struct B
{
     using arr_type = array<A,3>;
     char asd = 0;
     A a1;  
     A a2;
     A a3;

     // is this safe to use to loop trough all 3 elements?
     arr_type* p1 = reinterpret_cast<arr_type*>(&a1);
 };

Structs need to align naturally for their types, and so do arrays, but I don't know of any rule saying they have to be the same alignment points.

If there were such a rule that struct layout boundaries for members like this and array boundaries will be the same--it would only apply to standard layout structs:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/7189821/211160

All bets would be off if you did something like:

private:
    A a1;
    A a2;
public:
    A a3;

I'd imagine all bets would be off if it contained anything that flipped off the standard layout switch. As it was questionable to start with, I'd say don't even do it then.

(I'd also wonder what kind of differences #pragma pack() would throw in for arrays vs. structs...not that #pragmas are in the standard, I just wonder.)

union E
{
    A arr[3];
    struct {
        A a1;
        A a2;
        A a3;
    };
};

No, arr[N] and aN would not be equivalent. There are some subtle details about how you can use initial sequences in unions for compatible reading in C++...but that's only between structures with compatible sequences. It says nothing about a struct and an array:

Type punning a struct in C and C++ via a union

I'm gonna be using those a1, a2, a3 names very often, and it's harder to debug them if they are function calls in visual studio. And again, I'm going to be using those fields a lot, so I want to be able to check their values easily.

"And the following is clearly safe, but it has a 4 byte overhead for each reference"

In practice it appears you are correct, that today's GCC isn't optimizing it out (per your links):

https://godbolt.org/g/6jAtD5

http://ideone.com/zZqfor

That's disappointing and they could be optimized out, as there's nothing in the standard saying they have to take up space. They point internally to the structure, and they don't change for the lifetime of the structure. :-/

Your complaint against the function access which would be optimized away was that it wasn't debugger-friendly enough. Why not do both?

struct B
{
    char asd;
    A arr[3];

    A& a1() { return arr[0] }
    const A& a1() const { return arr[0]; }
    A& a2() { return arr[1] };
    const A& a2() const { return arr[1]; }
    A& a3() { return arr[2] };
    const A& a3() const { return arr[2]; }

#if !defined(NDEBUG)
    A& a1_debug = arr[0];
    A& a2_debug = arr[1];
    A& a3_debug = arr[2];
#endif
};

If debugger-friendliness features of projecting your data structures is important to you...it might be a good use of time to learn how to write custom debugger helpers for your environment, e.g.:

http://doc.qt.io/qtcreator/creator-debugging-helpers.html

I guess whether that's worth it depends on how often you have this kind of concern.

14
  • @Phantom You edited your question a lot of times while I was answering, hard to keep track. Apr 7, 2016 at 5:23
  • Yes, I did, mainly because user657267 hinted it wasn't good enough. I'm going to use a1, a2, a3 often, and keep using them in release builds. The names are obviously not a1, a2 , a3 tho, and I have more than 3 variables as well.
    – Gam
    Apr 7, 2016 at 5:29
  • 1
    I would like to nicely ask more data about your claim that compilers can optimize a struct (and remove a field if it's not used). This, in my eyes, don't make any sense.
    – Gam
    Apr 7, 2016 at 5:45
  • As far as I'm aware, structs do guarantee that the order in memory is the same as declared, and fields would not be optimized away. Having said that, you're not guaranteed contiguous memory for fields either, because of alignment. I don't have time to find any relevant information in the standard right now to verify what I just said, so I'll just leave this here as a comment. Apr 7, 2016 at 5:53
  • @BartvanNierop If a class type has an int and a char (5 bytes), and it's not aligned, then the next member with the same type should have 5 bytes as well. If it's aligned, and has 6 bytes, and the next one should have 6 bytes too. It doesn't makes sense why would a compiler align a member with X type and then not align the next one that has the same type.
    – Gam
    Apr 7, 2016 at 6:14
2

No need for such nastiness.

std::tuple coupled with a lambda gives you all the functionality you want. Plus it's perfectly legal, optimal and correct.

If we define a member function that returns a tuple of references to all As in the structure:

  auto all_a() const {
    return std::tie(a1, a2, a3);
  }

...then create a little plumbing for provide a means to walk over the tuple (see below)...

... we can write code like this:

  B b;
  for_each(b.all_a(), 
           [](const A& a) { std::cout << a << std::endl; });

Full example (although I didn't implement operator<<, you can do that yourself).

#include<iostream>
#include<array>
#include<tuple>
#include<utility>

using namespace std;

struct A
{
    int a   = 1;
    short b = 2;
    char c  = 3;
};
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A& a);

struct B
{
    char asd = 0;
    A a1;  
    A a2;
    A a3;

  auto all_a() const {
    return std::tie(a1, a2, a3);
  }

};


template<class Tuple, size_t...Is, class F>
  void for_each_impl(const Tuple& t, std::index_sequence<Is...>, F&& f)
{
  using expand = int[];
  void(expand { 0, (void(f(std::get<Is>(t))),0)... });
}

template<class...Ts, class F>
void for_each(const std::tuple<Ts...> ts, F&& f)
{
  using expand = int[];
  for_each_impl(ts, 
                std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(Ts)>(), 
                std::forward<F>(f));
}

int main()
{
  B b;
  for_each(b.all_a(), 
           [](const A& a) { std::cout << a << std::endl; });

}
4
  • 1
    Presumably the goal is a "guarantee" of compatibility with clients who expect arrays... and as an abstraction, std::tuple would make even fewer promises of that... "Not only is there no requirement that the objects be arranged any particular way, but many tuple implementations actually put the second object before the first one." Apr 7, 2016 at 7:54
  • @HostileFork the presumption of compatibility was not stated in the question so i can't address that. The actual physical order of items in the tuple doe not matter. What matters is the order of access. This is guaranteed since we're accessing through a sequence of calls to std::get<I> with increasing I. Apr 7, 2016 at 8:06
  • @HostileFork for the record, if compatibility with clients that need an array was the goal, then I completely concur with your solution of storing the data in an array and providing proxy accessors. Apr 7, 2016 at 8:09
  • Good point it's not clear, title is ambiguous. I made it less so in favor of what I think the interpretation is...OP can correct if it's wrong. :-) Apr 7, 2016 at 8:29

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