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We are building an application on an embedded platform that needs a reasonably high performance database (very low select speeds on tables with > 500,000 entries).

The database needs to be able to :

  • Store atomic commit information in NVRAM so that such information is preserved if power fails before the commit finishes.
  • Be written to NAND Flash in such a way as to level wearing across the memory (could be done using, e.g. jffs2 or yaffs2).

    Currently our options appear to be a "roll-your own" approach, or possibly SQLite.

    Any other options, or pointers about the details of "rolling your own" or working with SQLite appreciated!

    Edit: The target has 32MB of RAM, 1MB of NVRAM and 64MB of NAND Flash. The rest of the code is C, so that is the preferred language. The target processor is an ARM. In general, the queries that need to have the most performance are pretty simple. Complex queries don't need to have the same level of performance.

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    • Any information on the platform? How much RAM? What kind of CPU? What kind of code will it be able to run? Java? C? .NET? There are a few possible options that will vary greatly depending on what resources are available.
      – lpfavreau
      Dec 13 '08 at 3:57
    • Also, will you need to do complex queries (order, group, joins, combined conditions, and the likes) or you are more looking at a 1) add a row 2) extract row based on a key pattern?
      – lpfavreau
      Dec 13 '08 at 4:05
    • Are you aware that any reasonable RDBMS preserves information in a transaction log to recover from a power failure?
      – HTTP 410
      Dec 14 '08 at 12:16
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    Apple's iPhone (and iPod Touch) uses the SQLite DB for a lot of its functions, so there's definitely a proven flash-based platform there. However, I doubt the amount of data in any of those tables has > 500k rows.

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    • Marc, I'm accepting this answer because it gave me the most new information! Thanks!
      – Peter K.
      Dec 31 '08 at 16:03
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    I think this Wikipedia RDBMS comparison might help you in making your choice.

    But I don't understand why you have your specific NVRAM requirement.

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    • We need the system to preserve all information, even during a power failure. The NVRAM needs to keep information about any transactions that were in progress when the power failed.
      – Peter K.
      Dec 14 '08 at 3:05
    • That's what a transaction log does. It's written before a transaction starts, and can then be used to rollback or re-apply after a power failure.
      – HTTP 410
      Dec 14 '08 at 12:17
    • @RoadWarrior: OK, I've heard it called different things. Thanks for clarification. Our aim is to have the transaction log in NVRAM.
      – Peter K.
      Dec 15 '08 at 14:37
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    Codebase provides a solid portable lightweight fast isam with transactions.

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    • Hmm. I downloaded the Codebase example and it's pretty slow compared with SQLite.
      – Peter K.
      Dec 14 '08 at 16:53
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    If your embedded system has access to the .NET framework, you can embed VistaDB.

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