133

I would like to create extensions for some components already deployed in Angular 2, without having to rewrite them almost completely, as the base component could undergo changes and wish these changes were also reflected in its derived components.

I created this simple example to try to explain better my questions:

With the following base component app/base-panel.component.ts:

import {Component, Input} from 'angular2/core';

@Component({
    selector: 'base-panel',
    template: '<div class="panel" [style.background-color]="color" (click)="onClick($event)">{{content}}</div>',
    styles: [`
    .panel{
    padding: 50px;
  }
  `]
})
export class BasePanelComponent { 

  @Input() content: string;

  color: string = "red";

  onClick(event){
    console.log("Click color: " + this.color);
  }
}

Would you like to create another derivative component only alter, for example, a basic component behavior in the case of the example color, app/my-panel.component.ts:

import {Component} from 'angular2/core';
import {BasePanelComponent} from './base-panel.component'

@Component({
    selector: 'my-panel',
    template: '<div class="panel" [style.background-color]="color" (click)="onClick($event)">{{content}}</div>',
    styles: [`
    .panel{
    padding: 50px;
  }
  `]
})
export class MyPanelComponent extends BasePanelComponent{

  constructor() {
    super();
    this.color = "blue";
  }
}

Complete working example in Plunker

Note: Obviously this example is simple and could be solved otherwise no need to use inheritance, but it is intended only to illustrate the real problem.

As you can see in the implementation of the derivative component app/my-panel.component.ts, much of the implementation was repeated, and the single part really inherited was the class BasePanelComponent, but the @Component had to basically be completely repeated, not just the changed portions, as the selector: 'my-panel'.

Is there some way to make a literally full inheritance of a component Angular2, inheriting the class definition of the markings/annotations, as for example @Component?

Edit 1 - Feature Request

Feature request angular2 added to the project on GitHub: Extend/Inherit angular2 components annotations #7968

Edit 2 - Closed Request

The request was closed, for this reason, that briefly would not know how to merge the decorator will be made. Leaving us with no options. So my opinion is is quoted in the Issue.

  • Check this answer stackoverflow.com/questions/36063627/… Regards – NicolasB Sep 26 '16 at 15:34
  • Ok NicolasB. But my problem is with the inheritance of the decorator @Component, which is not applied to the inheritance metadata. =/ – Fernando Leal Sep 26 '16 at 16:37
  • people, please avoid using inheritance with angular. e.g. export class PlannedFilterComponent extends AbstractFilterComponent implements OnInit { is very bad. There are other ways to share code e.g. services & smaller components. Inheritance is not the angular way. I'm on an angular project where they used inheritance and there are things that break such as exporting components that inherit from abstract components missing inputs of the abstract class. – robert king Dec 12 '17 at 1:40
  • use content projection instead e.g. github.com/angular/components/blob/master/src/material/card/… don't use inheritance – robert king Aug 7 at 0:33

10 Answers 10

32

Alternative Solution:

This answer of Thierry Templier is an alternative way to get around the problem.

After some questions with Thierry Templier, I came to the following working example that meets my expectations as an alternative to inheritance limitation mentioned in this question:

1 - Create custom decorator:

export function CustomComponent(annotation: any) {
  return function (target: Function) {
    var parentTarget = Object.getPrototypeOf(target.prototype).constructor;
    var parentAnnotations = Reflect.getMetadata('annotations', parentTarget);

    var parentAnnotation = parentAnnotations[0];
    Object.keys(parentAnnotation).forEach(key => {
      if (isPresent(parentAnnotation[key])) {
        // verify is annotation typeof function
        if(typeof annotation[key] === 'function'){
          annotation[key] = annotation[key].call(this, parentAnnotation[key]);
        }else if(
        // force override in annotation base
        !isPresent(annotation[key])
        ){
          annotation[key] = parentAnnotation[key];
        }
      }
    });

    var metadata = new Component(annotation);

    Reflect.defineMetadata('annotations', [ metadata ], target);
  }
}

2 - Base Component with @Component decorator:

@Component({
  // create seletor base for test override property
  selector: 'master',
  template: `
    <div>Test</div>
  `
})
export class AbstractComponent {

}

3 - Sub component with @CustomComponent decorator:

@CustomComponent({
  // override property annotation
  //selector: 'sub',
  selector: (parentSelector) => { return parentSelector + 'sub'}
})
export class SubComponent extends AbstractComponent {
  constructor() {
  }
}

Plunkr with complete example.

  • 3
    I assume that this won't be compatible with offline template compiler. – Günter Zöchbauer Jun 28 '16 at 13:25
  • @GünterZöchbauer, I have no knowledge about "offline compiler template" of Angular2. But I think that may not be compatible, and it would be an alternative option. Where the mode "offline template compiler" of Angular2 would be useful? You can show me something to better understand about this? So I can understand the importance of this compatibility for my project. – Fernando Leal Jun 28 '16 at 13:57
  • Offline template compiler (OTC) is not yet functional even though it is already included in RC.3. OTC will analyze the decorators and generate code during a build step when the deployable is generated. OTC allows to remove Angular2 parser and compiler that process decorators and bindings at runtime, which leads to notable smaller code size and faster application and component initialization. OTC will probably become usable with one of the next updates. – Günter Zöchbauer Jun 28 '16 at 15:14
  • 1
    @GünterZöchbauer, now I understand the importance in maintaining the functionality compatible with OTC. It will be a pre-compilation of angular decorators reducing overhead to initialize components. I would like to have known about the functioning of this process and because the solution of this answer will not be compatible with OTC? How is the pre-compilation of decorators? Having this knowledge we might think of something to keep this functional alternative to OTC. Thank you for the clarification! – Fernando Leal Jun 28 '16 at 16:40
25

Angular 2 version 2.3 was just released, and it includes native component inheritance. It looks like you can inherit and override whatever you want, except for templates and styles. Some references:

  • One "gotcha" here occurs when you forget to specify a new a "selector" in the child component. You will get a runtime error along the lines of More than one component matched on this element if you do not. – The Aelfinn Jan 23 '17 at 17:39
  • @TheAelfinn Yeah: each component has to have a complete spec in the @Component() tag. But, you can share the .html or .css by referring to the same file if you want. All in all, it's a big plus. – Daniel Griscom Jan 23 '17 at 21:40
  • In your second link scotch.io/tutorials/component-inheritance-in-angular-2 , the author claims that components inherit their parent's dependency injected services, my code suggests otherwise. Can you confirm that this is supported? – The Aelfinn Jan 23 '17 at 21:48
17

Now that TypeScript 2.2 supports Mixins through Class expressions we have a much better way to express Mixins on Components. Mind you that you can also use Component inheritance since angular 2.3 (discussion) or a custom decorator as discussed in other answers here. However, I think Mixins have some properties that make them preferable for reusing behavior across components:

  • Mixins compose more flexibly, i.e. you can mix and match Mixins on existing components or combine Mixins to form new Components
  • Mixin composition remains easy to understand thanks to its obvious linearization to a class inheritance hierarchy
  • You can more easily avoid issues with decorators and annotations that plague component inheritance (discussion)

I strongly suggest you read the TypeScript 2.2 announcement above to understand how Mixins work. The linked discussions in angular GitHub issues provide additional detail.

You'll need these types:

export type Constructor<T> = new (...args: any[]) => T;

export class MixinRoot {
}

And then you can declare a Mixin like this Destroyable mixin that helps components keep track of subscriptions that need to be disposed in ngOnDestroy:

export function Destroyable<T extends Constructor<{}>>(Base: T) {
  return class Mixin extends Base implements OnDestroy {
    private readonly subscriptions: Subscription[] = [];

    protected registerSubscription(sub: Subscription) {
      this.subscriptions.push(sub);
    }

    public ngOnDestroy() {
      this.subscriptions.forEach(x => x.unsubscribe());
      this.subscriptions.length = 0; // release memory
    }
  };
}

To mixin Destroyable into a Component, you declare your component like this:

export class DashboardComponent extends Destroyable(MixinRoot) 
    implements OnInit, OnDestroy { ... }

Note that MixinRoot is only necessary when you want to extend a Mixin composition. You can easily extend multiple mixins e.g. A extends B(C(D)). This is the obvious linearization of mixins I was talking about above, e.g. you're effectively composing an inheritnace hierarchy A -> B -> C -> D.

In other cases, e.g. when you want to compose Mixins on an existing class, you can apply the Mixin like so:

const MyClassWithMixin = MyMixin(MyClass);

However, I found the first way works best for Components and Directives, as these also need to be decorated with @Component or @Directive anyway.

  • this is awesome! thanks for the suggestion. is MixinRoot simply being used as an empty class placeholder here? just want to make sure my understanding is correct. – Alex Lockwood May 19 '17 at 17:38
  • @AlexLockwood yup, empty class placeholder is exactly what I'm using it for. I'd happily avoid using it but for now I haven't found a better way to do it. – Johannes Rudolph May 21 '17 at 19:03
  • 2
    I ended up using function Destroyable<T extends Constructor<{}>>(Base = class { } as T). That way I can create mixins using extends Destroyable(). – Alex Lockwood May 22 '17 at 16:20
  • 1
    This looks very good, however is seems that AoT build (Cli1.3) removes ngOnDestroy from DashBoardComponent as it never gets called. (same goes for ngOnInit) – dzolnjan Aug 24 '17 at 13:39
  • thanks for this solution. However after a prod build with ionic or angular-cli, the mixin doesn't work somehow, as if it hasn't been extended. – Han Che Oct 6 '17 at 13:11
15

update

Component inheritance is supported since 2.3.0-rc.0

original

So far, the most convenient for me is to keep template & styles into separate *html & *.css files and specify those through templateUrl and styleUrls, so it's easy reusable.

@Component {
    selector: 'my-panel',
    templateUrl: 'app/components/panel.html', 
    styleUrls: ['app/components/panel.css']
}
export class MyPanelComponent extends BasePanelComponent
  • 2
    This is exactly what I need. What would the @Component decorator look like for BasePanelComponent? Could it reference different html/css files? Could it reference the same html/css files referenced by MyPanelComponent? – ebhh2001 Sep 7 '16 at 4:08
  • 1
    This does not inherit @Input() and @Output() decorators, does it? – Leon Adler Nov 30 '16 at 18:32
10

As far as I know component inheritance has not been implemented yet in Angular 2 and I'm not sure if they have plans to, however since Angular 2 is using typescript (if you've decided to go that route) you can use class inheritance by doing class MyClass extends OtherClass { ... }. For component inheritance I'd suggest getting involved with the Angular 2 project by going to https://github.com/angular/angular/issues and submitting a feature request!

  • Got it, I'll try in the next days iterating me angular2 project and verify the request feature is no longer in the project issues in Git and if not I will draw up a request for the resource, since it seems to me a very interesting feature. Any extra arguments idea to make the most interesting request? – Fernando Leal Apr 7 '16 at 19:39
  • 1
    Regarding the typescript of the inheritance resource I'm already using in my initial solution (export class MyPanelComponent extends BasePanelComponent), the problem is only in the case of Annotations/Decorators are not inherited. – Fernando Leal Apr 7 '16 at 19:43
  • 1
    Yeah, I really don't know what else you could add. I like the idea of either having a new decorator (something like @SubComponent()) that marks a class as a subcomponent or having an extra field on the @Component decorator that allows you to reference a parent component to inherit from. – watzon Apr 7 '16 at 19:47
  • 1
    Feature request angular2 added to the project on GitHub: Extend/Inherit angular2 components annotations #7968 – Fernando Leal Apr 8 '16 at 12:14
5

I know this doesn't answer your question but I really think inheriting / extending components should be avoided. Here's my reasoning:

If the abstract class extended by two or more components contains shared logic: use a service or even create a new typescript class that can be shared between the two components.

If the abstract class... contains shared variables or onClicketc functions, Then there will be duplication between the html of the two extending components views. This is bad practice & that shared html needs to be broken into Component(s). These Component(s) (parts) can be shared between the two components.

Am I missing other reasons for having an abstract class for components?

An example I saw recently was components extending AutoUnsubscribe:

import { Subscription } from 'rxjs';
import { OnDestroy } from '@angular/core';
export abstract class AutoUnsubscribeComponent implements OnDestroy {
  protected infiniteSubscriptions: Array<Subscription>;

  constructor() {
    this.infiniteSubscriptions = [];
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    this.infiniteSubscriptions.forEach((subscription) => {
      subscription.unsubscribe();
    });
  }
}

this was bas because throughout a large codebase, infiniteSubscriptions.push() was only used 10 times. Also importing & extending AutoUnsubscribe actually takes more code than just adding mySubscription.unsubscribe() in the ngOnDestroy() method of the component itself, which required additional logic anyway.

  • Ok, I understand your collocation and I agree that aggregation almost solves all the problems that seems to need inheritance. And it's always interesting to think of components as small parts of the application that can be docked in a variety of ways. But in the case of the question the problem is that I do not have control / access to modifications in the component I want to inherit (it is a third component), then aggregation would become unfeasible, and inheritance would be the ideal solution. – Fernando Leal Aug 4 '17 at 12:01
  • why can't you just make a new component that encapsulates that third party component? What is your third party component out of interest? e.g. <my-calendar [stuff]=stuff><third-party-calendar [stuff]=stuff></..></..> – robert king Aug 5 '17 at 2:22
  • @robertking repeating yourself is very weak pattern... That's why you will starts to hate your job.. instead of enjoying it. – Dariusz Filipiak Mar 26 '18 at 12:43
  • As for me it's a good idea to extend components in case you want to have the same Input/Output params for a set of components, so they could behave as one. For example I have several registration steps (credentialsStep, addressStep, selectBenefitsStep). They all should have the same Input options(stepName, actionButtons...) and Outputs(complete, cancel). – Sergey_T Sep 5 at 21:47
  • @Sergey_T could you consider one component with ng select and content projection? Also repeating a few inputs doesn't seem like you're really saving on much functionality TBH. – robert king Sep 8 at 7:07
2

If anyone is looking for an updated solution, Fernando's answer is pretty much perfect. Except that ComponentMetadata has been deprecated. Using Component instead worked for me.

The full Custom Decorator CustomDecorator.ts file looks like this:

import 'zone.js';
import 'reflect-metadata';
import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { isPresent } from "@angular/platform-browser/src/facade/lang";

export function CustomComponent(annotation: any) {
  return function (target: Function) {
    var parentTarget = Object.getPrototypeOf(target.prototype).constructor;
    var parentAnnotations = Reflect.getMetadata('annotations', parentTarget);

    var parentAnnotation = parentAnnotations[0];
    Object.keys(parentAnnotation).forEach(key => {
      if (isPresent(parentAnnotation[key])) {
        // verify is annotation typeof function
        if(typeof annotation[key] === 'function'){
          annotation[key] = annotation[key].call(this, parentAnnotation[key]);
        }else if(
          // force override in annotation base
          !isPresent(annotation[key])
        ){
          annotation[key] = parentAnnotation[key];
        }
      }
    });

    var metadata = new Component(annotation);

    Reflect.defineMetadata('annotations', [ metadata ], target);
  }
}

Then import it in to your new component sub-component.component.ts file and use @CustomComponent instead of @Component like this:

import { CustomComponent } from './CustomDecorator';
import { AbstractComponent } from 'path/to/file';

...

@CustomComponent({
  selector: 'subcomponent'
})
export class SubComponent extends AbstractComponent {

  constructor() {
    super();
  }

  // Add new logic here!
}
  • Are custom decorators not highly discouraged? From many other post/threads this solution has been marked as completely wrong because AOT won't support them? – TerNovi May 25 '18 at 14:04
2

Let us understand some key limitations & features on Angular’s component inheritance system.

The component only inherits the class logic All meta-data in the @Component decorator is not inherited Component @Input properties and @Output properties are inherited Component lifecycle is not inherited These features are very important to have in mind so let us examine each one independently.

The Component only inherits the class logic When you inherit a Component, all logic inside is equally inherited. It is worth noting that only public members are inherited as private members are only accessible in the class that implements them. All meta-data in the @Component decorator is not inherited The fact that no meta-data is inherited might seem counter-intuitive at first but, if you think about this it actually makes perfect sense. If you inherit from a Component say (componentA), you would not want the selector of ComponentA, which you are inheriting from to replace the selector of ComponentB which is the class that is inheriting. The same can be said for the template/templateUrl as well as the style/styleUrls.

Component @Input and @Output properties are inherited

This is another feature that I really love about component Inheritance in Angular. In a simple sentence, whenever you have a custom @Input and @Ouput property, these properties get inherited.

Component lifecycle is not inherited This part is the one that is not soo obvious especially to people who have not extensively worked with OOP principles. For example, say you have ComponentA which implements one of Angular’s many lifecycle hooks like OnInit. If you create ComponentB and inherit ComponentA, the OnInit lifecycle from ComponentA won't fire until you explicitly call it even if you do have this OnInit lifecycle for ComponentB.

Calling Super/Base Component Methods In order to have the ngOnInit() method from ComponentA fire, we need to use the super keyword and then call the method we need which in this case is ngOnInit. The super keyword refers to the instance of the component that is being inherited from which in this case will be ComponentA.

1

Components can be extended as same as a typescript class inheritance, just that you have to override the selector with a new name. All Input() and Output() Properties from the Parent Component works as normal

Update

@Component is a decorator,

Decorators are applied during the declaration of class not on objects.

Basically, decorators add some metadata to the class object and that cannot be accessed via inheritance.

If you want to achieve the Decorator Inheritance I would Suggest writing a custom decorator. Something like below example.

export function CustomComponent(annotation: any) {
    return function (target: Function) {
    var parentTarget = Object.getPrototypeOf(target.prototype).constructor;

    var parentAnnotations = Reflect.getMetadata('annotations', parentTarget);
    var parentParamTypes = Reflect.getMetadata('design:paramtypes', parentTarget);
    var parentPropMetadata = Reflect.getMetadata('propMetadata', parentTarget);
    var parentParameters = Reflect.getMetadata('parameters', parentTarget);

    var parentAnnotation = parentAnnotations[0];

    Object.keys(parentAnnotation).forEach(key => {
    if (isPresent(parentAnnotation[key])) {
        if (!isPresent(annotation[key])) {
        annotation[key] = parentAnnotation[key];
        }
    }
    });
    // Same for the other metadata
    var metadata = new ComponentMetadata(annotation);

    Reflect.defineMetadata('annotations', [ metadata ], target);
    };
};

Refer: https://medium.com/@ttemplier/angular2-decorators-and-class-inheritance-905921dbd1b7

  • Could you exemplify (using the example of the question) how would that work? You could use stackblitz to develop the example and share the link. – Fernando Leal May 8 '18 at 11:58
  • @Component is a decorator, Decorators are applied during the declaration of class not on objects. – MAHESH VALIYA VEETIL May 9 '18 at 7:52
0
just use inheritance,Extend parent class in child class and declare constructor with parent class parameter and this parameter use in super().

1.parent class
@Component({
    selector: 'teams-players-box',
    templateUrl: '/maxweb/app/app/teams-players-box.component.html'
})
export class TeamsPlayersBoxComponent {
    public _userProfile:UserProfile;
    public _user_img:any;
    public _box_class:string="about-team teams-blockbox";
    public fullname:string;
    public _index:any;
    public _isView:string;
    indexnumber:number;
    constructor(
        public _userProfilesSvc: UserProfiles,
        public _router:Router,
    ){}
2.child class
@Component({

    selector: '[teams-players-eligibility]',
    templateUrl: '/maxweb/app/app/teams-players-eligibility.component.html'
})
export class TeamsPlayersEligibilityComponent extends TeamsPlayersBoxComponent{

    constructor (public _userProfilesSvc: UserProfiles,
            public _router:Router) {
            super(_userProfilesSvc,_router);
        }
}

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