0

I'm just trying to write a very simple function with a variable number of arguments so I can write a function similar to printf for an assignment. After looking at the documentation for va_list I'm not sure why this code keeps giving me run-time errors:

enter image description here

Here is my code:

void print(string sOne , ...);
void main()
{
    print("first string", "second string", "third String");
    system("pause");
}

void print(string sOne , ...)
{
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, sOne);
     while ((va_arg(arguments, int)) != 0)
    {
        string printString = va_arg(arguments, string);
        cout << printString;
    }
    va_end(arguments);
}
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  • 2
    Please post your runtime errors as a part of the question.
    – Rick Smith
    Apr 7 '16 at 15:53
  • @RickSmith I've added in the error I get on my system, it arises from an impropper use of va_arg Apr 7 '16 at 18:14
  • Where does the error happen according to the call stack? Apr 7 '16 at 18:45
  • 1
    @ivan_pozdeev On the line: string printString = va_arg(arguments, string); Apr 7 '16 at 19:03
  • Thanks for posting your error. Please edit your question to not use an image of your error. This will make it easier to search for you question later.
    – Rick Smith
    Apr 7 '16 at 22:22
7

Your implementation of variadic function is very incorrect.

First, you need a some way to tell the function how many arguments there are or when they end. Standard printf does this by using format specifiers (their number represents the number of args), another option is to provide the number explicitly. You seem to expect the last argument to be integer 0 (strange choice btw.), but you never pass 0 as a last argument to your variadic function.

Second, you can't portably extract std::string from variadic function arguments. Only trivial types are fully supported, and for strings you have to use char*. std::string is not trivial, because it has non-trivial constructor and destructor. Some compilers do support non-trivial types as arguments for such functions, but others do not, so you shouldn't try this.

The last, but not the least: variadic functions have no place in C++ world, even for assignments.

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  • I disagree with your final statement. Varadic functions are essential to meta programming. Apr 7 '16 at 14:48
  • @Jonathan Mee C++ has variadic templates and initializer_list's, what more do you need? va_list is just legacy cruft IMHO. Apr 7 '16 at 15:22
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    @JesperJuhl, they were. Before expression SFINAE descendened on us.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 7 '16 at 15:26
  • You often need va_list to take advantage of Varadic Templates, though I do agree that in a lot of cases the encapsulations of such are coming of age. Apr 7 '16 at 15:26
  • @JesperJuhl, I suppose, he referes to decades old trick for checking the presence of a member.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 7 '16 at 15:27
2

SergeyA explained why your code does not work, here is one of the possible solutions:

void print(const char *sOne , ...);
int main()
{
    print("first string", "second string", "third String", nullptr);
    system("pause");
}

void print(const char *sOne , ...)
{
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, sOne);
    while (sOne)
    {
        cout << sOne;
        sOne = va_arg(arguments, const char *);
    }
    va_end(arguments);
}

Again this example is in case you have to use C-style variadic function, you should consider using C++ variadic template instead.

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So you have several problems with your implementation.

  1. You don't pass in a limit to the number of calls to va_arg and:

If va_arg is called when there are no more arguments in ap, or if the type of the next argument in ap (after promotions) is not compatible with T, the behavior is undefined

  1. You appear to want to print "first string" so you need to pass that as part of the va_list, you can clean up both 1 and 2 by using a count as your first argument: void print(int sOne, ...)
  2. You are passing in const char*s as arguments to your va_list and expecting it to promote those to strings. va_list will not promote for you. It casts whatever you passed in to the type specified in va_arg And if you try to treat a const char* as a string you will end up with a run-time error, as you have seen. This can be corrected by using strings as your va_list arguments: "first string"s "second string"s, "third String"s this is only conditionally supported in C++ You'll need to use va_arg(arguments, const char*)
  3. You are calling va_arg to advance your for loop. You'll need to use a counter for that. Calls to va_arg extract the next argument, they do not test if an argument is available. Instead use your count that you passed in as part of 2 for (auto i = 0; i < sOne; ++i)

Making those changes should get your code looking something like this:

void print(int sOne, ...) {
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, sOne);

    for (auto i = 0; i < sOne; ++i) {
        cout << va_arg(arguments, const char*) << endl;
    }
    va_end(arguments);
}

Live Example

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  • Undefined behaviour. If va_arg is called when ... the type of the next argument in ap (after promotions) is not compatible with T, the behavior is undefined...
    – SergeyA
    Apr 7 '16 at 17:55
  • @SergeyA I agree with that... But I assume you posted it cause my answer doesn't seem to? Could you explain to me how your statement conflicts with what I said? Apr 7 '16 at 18:00
  • The actual type of the argument in this case is const char*. std::string is not a compatible type for const char* and const char* can not be promoted to std::string. Thus va_arg(arguments, string) sports undefined behavior.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 7 '16 at 18:02
  • @SergeyA Did you read my answer before downvoting? Pay close attention to 3: string::operator ""s Apr 7 '16 at 18:04
  • 2
    Here are details stackoverflow.com/questions/10083844/…
    – Slava
    Apr 7 '16 at 18:28

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