56

I have a query to the effect of

SELECT t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
LIMIT 10,20

I want to know to many total rows this query would return without the LIMIT (so I can show pagination information).

Normally, I would use this query:

SELECT COUNT(t3.id) FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id

However the GROUP BY changes the meaning of the COUNT, and instead I get a set of rows representing the number of unique t3.id values in each group.

Is there a way to get a count for the total number of rows when I use a GROUP BY? I'd like to avoid having to execute the entire query and just counting the number of rows, since I only need a subset of the rows because the values are paginated. I'm using MySQL 5, but I think this pretty generic.

53

There is a nice solution in MySQL.

Add the keyword SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS right after the keyword SELECT :

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
LIMIT 10,20

After that, run another query with the function FOUND_ROWS() :

SELECT FOUND_ROWS();

It should return the number of rows without the LIMIT clause.

Checkout this page for more information : http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/information-functions.html#function_found-rows

50

Are the "bunch of other stuff" all aggregates? I'm assuming so since your GROUP BY only has t3.id. If that's the case then this should work:

SELECT
     COUNT(DISTINCT t3.id)
FROM...

The other option of course is:

SELECT
     COUNT(*)
FROM
     (
     <Your query here>
     ) AS SQ

I don't use MySQL, so I don't know if these queries will work there or not.

  • 2
    In MySQL this will bug, but it might be an ok solution if you add an alias for the generated table. Otherwise you'll get the error: "Every derived table must have its own alias". So be sure to write something like: select count(*) from (your query) as resultTable – Kennethvr Aug 31 '10 at 11:44
  • Thanks for the heads-up. I've made the edit. – Tom H Aug 31 '10 at 13:56
  • 5
    works in MySQL for me. – quano Feb 7 '11 at 9:48
  • the first option worked perfectly for me! thanks buddy – isabelle martz Jan 30 '17 at 21:59
12

Using sub queries :

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM    
(
SELECT t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
)    
as temp;

so temp contains the count of rows.

11

You're using MySQL, so you can use their function to do exactly this.

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff 
FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
LIMIT 10,20;

SELECT FOUND_ROWS(); -- for most recent query

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/information-functions.html#function_found-rows

  • The SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS query modifier and accompanying FOUND_ROWS() function are deprecated as of MySQL 8.0.17 and will be removed in a future MySQL version. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/… – Mrskman May 28 at 10:26
  • Thanks, good tip. I answered this question in 2008, and since then I've seen benchmarks that show SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS causes performance problems. Sometimes (depending on how much data you're scanning), you are better off running two queries, one to COUNT(*) and the second to run the query with LIMIT and not with SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS. – Bill Karwin May 28 at 16:02
1

All ans given will execute the query and then find the count. Distinct is definitely slower than group by on large dataset.

Best way to find the count of group by is below

SELECT 
    sum(1) as counttotal
FROM (
    Your query with group by operator
) as T

This will find the count while calculating group by.

protected by user7116 Sep 28 '11 at 18:41

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