2

I have this structure in html

<div id="A">
   ....
   <div id="B">
      ....
   </div>
   ....
</div>

How can I write a CSS rule, that says, make all a tags color white inside #A, but ignore what's in #B?

I would prefer to have something like :not(#B) and not put another wrapper tag or anything too hardcoded.

Thanks

4
  • Possible duplicate of css selector for first direct child only
    – Jeff.Clark
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:08
  • I don't want to restrict it to direct children, that's why I put .....
    – omega
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:11
  • Also, visit css-tricks.com/child-and-sibling-selectors for more fun stuff on child and sibling selectors.
    – Jeff.Clark
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:11
  • You need to put in a more complete example then. You say, "...make all a tags color white inside #A, but ignore what's in #B..." That could mean that you ONLY want links that are direct children of A, or it could mean all descendants of A, except anything in B. You must be explicit
    – Jeff.Clark
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:13
7

Best solution (although still not perfext):

(Corrected after the comment and with the code of @Amit)

/* Either directly under #A, or in an element in #A that's not #B */
/* The element that's not #B must be a direct child of #A, otherwise */
/* children of children of #B will be selected anyway, as @Amit pointed out. */
#A > a, #A > :not(#B) a { color:red }
<div id="A">
   <a>red</a>
   <div id="B">
      <a>black</a>
      <p>
        <a>black</a>
      </p>
   </div>
   <p>
     <a>red</a>
   </p>
</div>

This still has problems (IE 9+ and not working if #B is wrapped), but it is the best solution we've got.

Incorrect, failing solution (just to show what's wrong):

#A > a, #A :not(#B) a { color:red }
<div id="A">
   <a>red</a>
   <div id="B">
      <a>black</a>
      <p>
        <a>black</a>
      </p>
   </div>
   <p>
     <a>red</a>
   </p>
</div>

6
  • That's wrong. Both of them... The first guarantees nothing - if any formatting other then the A related rules exist, it will also be reverted, but worse only on supported browsers (not all browsers). The second isn't any better, see my answer fit details.
    – Amit
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:48
  • @Amit Ok, I see I've made some mistakes. The first one is what came to mind first, but is not the best answer. I'll move it down, with a warning. The second actually really wrong, thanks for pointing out. I'll edit it and credit you, because I of course, can't leave it as it is. If I've forgotten something, please tell me.
    – LarsW
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:55
  • @Amit Thank you again for pointing out, it's really silly for the top answer to be wrong. I hope I gave you enough credit.
    – LarsW
    Apr 8 '16 at 21:07
  • I appreciate the thankful remarks, but I still claim there is no right answer. Any suggestion will be limited that way or the other.(side note, you probably want to remove the incorrect solution altogether)
    – Amit
    Apr 8 '16 at 21:09
  • @Amit Yeah, that's a thing. I forgot to tell about problems with this solution. I did add some emphasize to the incorrect solution being wrong, but I think I'll leave it in to show what was wrong.
    – LarsW
    Apr 8 '16 at 21:13
2

Why not do simply:

#A a {
 color:#fff;
}
#B a {
 color:green;
}
1
  • 1
    why not usually revolves around the higher specificity of ID selectors, which should generally be avoided.
    – zzzzBov
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:10
2

There's no solution that "just works" without restrictions. Your best effort would be to set explicit rules to elements within your negated selector (:not(#B)).

The reason for this is that rules are evaluated "positively", they look for a positive match, so for example (taken from one of the other "inaccurate" answers):

#A > a, #A :not(#B) a { color:green; }

/* for illustration purposes only */
#B { border:1px solid red; }
#B:before { content:"[I’m #B, my links aren’t green.]"; display:block; }
p { border:1px solid yellow; }
p:before { content:"[I’m a paragraph, the link inside me is not a child of #A.]"; display:block; }
<div id="A">
  <a href="#">Link</a>
  <div id="B">
    <span>
      <a href="#">I am green after all</a>
    </span>
  </div>
  <p>
    <a href="#">Link</a>
  </p>
</div>

The <span> around the link serves as a positive match for :not(#B), and the logic breaks.

Perhaps the closest you can get is by restricting matches the direct children plus nested children whose top most parent under A is not B:

#A > a, #A > :not(#B) a { color:green; }
<div id="A">
  <a href="#">Link</a>
  <div id="B">
    <span>
      <a href="#">I am really not green</a>
    </span>
  </div>
  <p>
    <a href="#">Link</a>
  </p>
</div>

But this would also break as soon as any element wraps B.

2

You’re on the right track with :not(#B) already.

You want to format the links that are direct children of #A, and those that are further down the tree, but not those in #B.

/* edited, was previously just #A > a, #A :not(#B) a, which won’t work for deeper nesting
   inside #B, as Amit pointed out */
#A > a, #A > :not(#B) a { color:green; }

/* for illustration purposes only */
#B { border:1px solid red; }
#B:before { content:"[I’m #B, my links aren’t green.]"; display:block; }
p { border:1px solid yellow; }
p:before { content:"[I’m a paragraph, the link inside me is not a child of #A.]"; display:block; }
<div id="A">
  <a href="#">Link</a>
  <div id="B">
    <a href="#">Link</a>
    <span><a href="#">Link inside span</a></span>              
  </div>
  <p>
    <a href="#">Link</a>
  </p>
</div>

Edit: As Amit pointed out, #A :not(#B) a would not work for links nested deeper into #B. So the :not(#B) part has to be a child of #A, #A > :not(#B) a. Example edited.

9
  • Does this work, if it was the a tags not under #B, was wrapped in say span tags? I don't want to restrict it to direct children of #A.
    – omega
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:13
  • Yes, to demonstrate exactly that, I did include the link that is wrapped in the paragraph element – so it is not a child of #A.
    – CBroe
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:14
  • @Amit: Yeah, thanks for shamelessly copycatting my example code … ;p
    – CBroe
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:53
  • Are you sure you noticed the ;p …?
    – CBroe
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:57
  • @Amit: No worries :) I edited my answer in that regard, and credited you for pointing this out. I did consider the situation where the links outside of #B would be nested deeper ( <p><a/></p>) in my example (which the first selector, #A > a of course would not catch), but did not think about what would happen for deeper nesting inside of #B. And you are totally right, :not(#B) on its own doesn’t work for that, because a span or anything else would of course also satisfy :not(#B).
    – CBroe
    Apr 8 '16 at 21:03
-1

If you are actually trying to target <a> tags that appear under these elements and had markup that looked like the following :

<div id="A">
    <a href='#'>Test A1</a>
       <div id="B">
          <a href='#'>Test B</a>
       </div>
     <a href='#'>Test A2</a>
</div>

You could take advantage of the direct descendant operator > in CSS to only target elements directly below #A and not within it's children :

#A > a {
  /* This will only target <a> elements that are beneath #A and not in #B */
  color: #FFF;
}

And example of this can be seen here and might look like :

enter image description here

Update

It looks like you don't want to just target <a> tags. If that is the case, you could probably generalize the previous statement by only targeting elements not in B under A :

#A > :not(#B) {
    color: #FFF;
}

Updating the example markup :

<div id="A">
    <a href='#'>Test A1</a>
    <div id="B">
        <a href='#'>Test B</a>
    </div>
    <div id="C">
        I'm in C
    </div>
    <a href='#'>Test A2</a>

still will work as expected :

enter image description here

2
  • In my case, it shouldn't be restricted to first child. I put .... meaning any html content, which could for example be another div that contains a.
    – omega
    Apr 8 '16 at 20:10
  • You could likely just change the <a> within the selector to :not(#B) as seen in the update above. Apr 8 '16 at 20:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.