34

How can I project the row number onto the linq query result set.

Instead of say:

field1, field2, field3

field1, field2, field3

I would like:

1, field1, field2, field3

2, field1, field2, field3

Here is my attempt at this:

public List<ScoreWithRank> GetHighScoresWithRank(string gameId, int count)
{
    Guid guid = new Guid(gameId);
    using (PPGEntities entities = new PPGEntities())
    {
        int i = 1;
        var query = from s in entities.Scores
                    where s.Game.Id == guid
                    orderby s.PlayerScore descending
                    select new ScoreWithRank()
                    {
                        Rank=i++,
                        PlayerName = s.PlayerName,
                        PlayerScore = s.PlayerScore
                    };
        return query.ToList<ScoreWithRank>();
    }
}

Unfortunately, the "Rank=i++" line throws the following compile-time exception:

"An expression tree may not contain an assignment operator"

1
55

Well, the easiest way would be to do it at the client side rather than the database side, and use the overload of Select which provides an index as well:

public List<ScoreWithRank> GetHighScoresWithRank(string gameId, int count)
{
    Guid guid = new Guid(gameId);
    using (PPGEntities entities = new PPGEntities())
    {
        var query = from s in entities.Scores
                    where s.Game.Id == guid
                    orderby s.PlayerScore descending
                    select new
                    {
                        PlayerName = s.PlayerName,
                        PlayerScore = s.PlayerScore
                    };

        return query.AsEnumerable() // Client-side from here on
                    .Select((player, index) => new ScoreWithRank()
                            {
                                PlayerName = player.PlayerName,
                                PlayerScore = player.PlayerScore,
                                Rank = index + 1;
                            })
                    .ToList();

    }
}
7
  • 3
    getting everything from the database it's not really a 'solution'
    – Adaptabi
    Apr 27 '11 at 8:42
  • 1
    @DotNetWise: It's not getting everything from the database - only the bit which matches the query. It's only getting the same amount of data from the database as the original attempt - just doing a little bit of post-processing.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 27 '11 at 8:52
  • How so? query.AsEnumerable() will feed all the matched records for the given gameId. Try to take only the positions ranked after 20th. You will get everything from the db in order to have the ranks and then cut out what you need. Not really the desired solution! Other than that - where is the count parameter used?
    – Adaptabi
    Jun 25 '11 at 8:49
  • 6
    @DotNetWise: I agree that the count parameter isn't being used yet, but so long as that's used before the AsEnumerable() call, it's fine. In particular, the where clause and the orderby clause are used before AsEnumerable, so all that filtering will occur in the database. As I said in my previous comment, it's only getting the records which match the query... in other words, the data which is required anyway. If you want to get positions ranked after 20th, you'd add a Skip call to query, or use query.Skip(20).AsEnumerable(). (You'd then want to adjust the Rank calculation.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Jun 25 '11 at 9:32
  • 7
    @MikeKulls: So just because you can't do all database stuff with LINQ, you do none of it? That sounds like throwing the baby out with the bathwater to me.
    – Jon Skeet
    Dec 7 '11 at 22:18
1

Ok, that did the trick. Thanks.

Here is my final code...

Server:

public List<Score> GetHighScores(string gameId, int count)
{
    Guid guid = new Guid(gameId);
    using (PPGEntities entities = new PPGEntities())
    {
        var query = from s in entities.Scores
                    where s.Game.Id == guid
                    orderby s.PlayerScore descending
                    select s;
        return query.ToList<Score>();
    }                                                                      
}

Client:

void hsc_LoadHighScoreCompleted(object sender, GetHighScoreCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    ObservableCollection<Score> list = e.Result;

    _listBox.ItemsSource = list.Select((player, index) => new ScoreWithRank()
                            {
                                PlayerName = player.PlayerName,
                                PlayerScore = player.PlayerScore,
                                Rank = index+=1
                            }).ToList();
}
4
  • Do you really need GetHighScores() to return a List<Score> instead of an IEnumerable<Score>? If you're going to convert it into a list, you might as well only do it once.
    – Jon Skeet
    Dec 13 '08 at 12:17
  • @Jon: He could call AsEnumerable instead but...The AsEnumerable method has no effect other than to change the compile-time type of source. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb335435.aspx - in other words, it won't bring the objects into memory. If he wants control over that, ToList is good
    – Amy B
    Dec 13 '08 at 14:24
  • Yes, but only if he needs to do it at that point. If he doesn't need to there's no point in copying all the data twice. Hence the question nature of my cooment :) In fact even AsEnumerable isn't needed of course - if the GetHighScores method is declared to return IEnumerable<Score> that'll do it.
    – Jon Skeet
    Dec 13 '08 at 14:29
  • Wouldn't Rank = index += 1 be better as Rank = index+1 ?
    – NetMage
    Jun 23 '17 at 20:21
0

You could also make just a slight adjustment to your original code to get it working. Word of caution, if you databind or access the object again, the Rank will increment each time. In those cases the top answer is better.

let Rank = i++

and

Rank.ToString()

Full code:

public List<ScoreWithRank> GetHighScoresWithRank(string gameId, int count)
{
Guid guid = new Guid(gameId);
using (PPGEntities entities = new PPGEntities())
{
    int i = 1;
    var query = from s in entities.Scores
                let Rank = i++
                where s.Game.Id == guid
                orderby s.PlayerScore descending
                select new ScoreWithRank()
                {
                    Rank.ToString(),
                    PlayerName = s.PlayerName,
                    PlayerScore = s.PlayerScore
                };
    return query.ToList<ScoreWithRank>();
}

}

1
  • 3
    This code won't even compile. It generates the error CS0832: An expression tree may not contain an assignment operator Dec 10 '13 at 9:10
0

This solution worked for me. http://www.dotnetfunda.com/articles/article1995-rownumber-simulation-in-linq.aspx

.Select((x, index) => new
{
     SequentialNumber = index + 1
    ,FieldFoo = x.FieldFoo                        
}).ToList();
1
  • The overload that takes an Int32 parameter is not supported by the entity framework. Notice that the article at dotNetFunda works with linq to objects. Dec 10 '13 at 9:07
0
List<Emp> Lstemp = GetEmpList(); 
int Srno = 0; 
var columns = from t in Lstemp 
              orderby t.Name 
              select new { 
                  Row_number=++Srno, 
                  EmpID = t.ID, 
                  Name = t.Name, 
                  City = t.City 
              };

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