3

I have been looking around the web for a while and I am wondering if there is a 'stable' defacto implementation of Radix Sort that is generally used?

Two classifications of radix sorts are least significant digit (LSD) radix sorts and most significant digit (MSD) radix sorts.

Looking for an example of LSD or MSD.

  • 3
    This is off topic here. Please visit the help center to see why. It is likely a better match at CODEREVIEW – mplungjan Apr 9 '16 at 6:17
  • Just updated the question, thanks – bendyourtaxes Apr 9 '16 at 6:48
  • 1
    The standard way to implement radix sort is LSD. It's been this way since the days of card sorters in the 1950's. With LSD, after each radix sort step, the bins can be concatenated for the next step. With MSD, the bins have to be kept separated, so if sorting base 10, that 10 bins on the first step, 100 bins on the second step, 1000 bins on the third step, ... , so it's not normally used. – rcgldr Apr 10 '16 at 0:50
5

My version is more verbose, but executes quickly even for large number of items:

      var testArray = [ 331, 454, 230, 34, 343, 45, 59, 453, 345, 231, 9 ];

  function radixBucketSort (arr) {
    var idx1, idx2, idx3, len1, len2, radix, radixKey;
    var radices = {}, buckets = {}, num, curr;
    var currLen, radixStr, currBucket;

    len1 = arr.length;
    len2 = 10;  // radix sort uses ten buckets

    // find the relevant radices to process for efficiency        
    for (idx1 = 0;idx1 < len1;idx1++) {
      radices[arr[idx1].toString().length] = 0;
    }

    // loop for each radix. For each radix we put all the items
    // in buckets, and then pull them out of the buckets.
    for (radix in radices) {          
      // put each array item in a bucket based on its radix value
      len1 = arr.length;
      for (idx1 = 0;idx1 < len1;idx1++) {
        curr = arr[idx1];
        // item length is used to find its current radix value
        currLen = curr.toString().length;
        // only put the item in a radix bucket if the item
        // key is as long as the radix
        if (currLen >= radix) {
          // radix starts from beginning of key, so need to
          // adjust to get redix values from start of stringified key
          radixKey = curr.toString()[currLen - radix];
          // create the bucket if it does not already exist
          if (!buckets.hasOwnProperty(radixKey)) {
            buckets[radixKey] = [];
          }
          // put the array value in the bucket
          buckets[radixKey].push(curr);          
        } else {
          if (!buckets.hasOwnProperty('0')) {
            buckets['0'] = [];
          }
          buckets['0'].push(curr);          
        }
      }
      // for current radix, items are in buckets, now put them
      // back in the array based on their buckets
      // this index moves us through the array as we insert items
      idx1 = 0;
      // go through all the buckets
      for (idx2 = 0;idx2 < len2;idx2++) {
        // only process buckets with items
        if (buckets[idx2] != null) {
          currBucket = buckets[idx2];
          // insert all bucket items into array
          len1 = currBucket.length;
          for (idx3 = 0;idx3 < len1;idx3++) {
            arr[idx1++] = currBucket[idx3];
          }
        }
      }
      buckets = {};
    }
  }
  radixBucketSort(testArray);
  console.dir(testArray);          
1

Javascript LSD sort:

var counter = [[]];
function sortLSD(array, maxDigitSymbols) {
    var mod = 10;
    var dev = 1;
    for (var i = 0; i < maxDigitSymbols; i++, dev *= 10, mod *= 10) {
        for (var j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
            var bucket = parseInt((array[j] % mod) / dev);
            if (counter[bucket] == null ) {
                counter[bucket] = [];
            }
            counter[bucket].push(array[j]);
        }
        var pos = 0;
        for (var j = 0; j < counter.length; j++) {
            var value = null ;
            if (counter[j] != null ) {
                while ((value = counter[j].shift()) != null ) {
                    array[pos++] = value;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return array;
}
var test = [22, 1,2,9,3,2,5,14,66];
console.log(sortLSD(test, 2));
1

Radix Sort is a wonderful linear time sorting algorithm. Many fast implementations have been done for CPU and GPU. Here is one I translated from my C++ implementation into JavaScript. It compares with JavaScript built-in sort and is 5 to 50X faster for sorting arrays of unsigned integers High Performance Radix Sort LSD

1

The following function does LSB radix sort on Uint32 values. It is faster than the built-in sort function, by the way.

It uses typed arrays to improve performance, but works just as fine if you pass plain arrays, as long as they contain only 32 bit values:

function radixSortUint32(input) {
  const arrayConstr = input.length < (1 << 16) ?
    Uint16Array :
    Uint32Array;
  const numberOfBins = 256 * 4;
  let count = new arrayConstr(numberOfBins);

  let output = new Uint32Array(input.length);

  // count all bytes in one pass
  for (let i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    let val = input[i];
    count[val & 0xFF]++;
    count[((val >> 8) & 0xFF) + 256]++;
    count[((val >> 16) & 0xFF) + 512]++;
    count[((val >> 24) & 0xFF) + 768]++;
  }

  // create summed array
  for (let j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
    let t = 0,
      sum = 0,
      offset = j * 256;
    for (let i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
      t = count[i + offset];
      count[i + offset] = sum;
      sum += t;
    }
  }

  for (let i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    let val = input[i];
    output[count[val & 0xFF]++] = val;
  }
  for (let i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    let val = output[i];
    input[count[((val >> 8) & 0xFF) + 256]++] = val;
  }
  for (let i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    let val = input[i];
    output[count[((val >> 16) & 0xFF) + 512]++] = val;
  }
  for (let i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    let val = output[i];
    input[count[((val >> 24) & 0xFF) + 768]++] = val;
  }

  return input;
}

Here's how you re-use the above for Int32 values:

function radixSortInt32(input) {
  // make use of ArrayBuffer to "reinterpret cast"
  // the Int32Array as a Uint32Array
  let uinput = input.buffer ?
    new Uint32Array(input.buffer):
    Uint32Array.from(input);

  // adjust to positive nrs
  for (let i = 0; i < uinput.length; i++) {
    uinput[i] += 0x80000000;
  }

  // re-use radixSortUint32
  radixSortUint32(uinput);

  // adjust back to signed nrs
  for (let i = 0; i < uinput.length; i++) {
    uinput[i] -= 0x80000000;
  }

  // for plain arrays, fake in-place behaviour
  if (input.buffer === undefined){
    for (let i = 0; i < input.length; i++){
      input[i] = uinput[i];
    }
  }

  return input;
}

And a similar trick for Float32 values:

function radixSortFloat32(input) {
  // make use of ArrayBuffer to "reinterpret cast"
  // the Float32Array as a Uint32Array
  let uinput = input.buffer ?
    new Uint32Array(input.buffer) :
    new Uint32Array(Float32Array.from(input).buffer);

  // Similar to radixSortInt32, but uses a more complicated trick
  // See: http://stereopsis.com/radixSort.html
  for (let i = 0; i < uinput.length; i++) {
    if (uinput[i] & 0x80000000) {
      uinput[i] ^= 0xFFFFFFFF;
    } else {
      uinput[i] ^= 0x80000000;
    }
  }

  // re-use radixSortUint32
  radixSortUint32(uinput);

  // adjust back to original floating point nrs
  for (let i = 0; i < uinput.length; i++) {
    if (uinput[i] & 0x80000000) {
      uinput[i] ^= 0x80000000;
    } else {
      uinput[i] ^= 0xFFFFFFFF;
    }
  }

  if (input.buffer === undefined){
    let floatTemp = new Float32Array(uinput.buffer);
    for(let i = 0; i < input.length; i++){
      input[i] = floatTemp[i];
    }
  }

  return input;
}

I made a set of these functions that work with all TypedArrays that are 32 bits or less. That is:

  • Uint32Array
  • Int32Array
  • Float32Array
  • Uint16Array
  • Int16Array
  • Uint8Array
  • Int8Array
  • Any plain array where you know all values fit one of these criteria

Full gist here. I might have a go at Float64 later, then we would have support for all javascript numbers, basically.

TypedArray benchmarks shows radix beats the built-in sort function.

It's faster with plain arrays too, although not quite as much because of the added overhead

1

With below code you can pass array with large number of items.

var counter = [
  []
]; // Radix sort Array container to hold arrays from 0th digit to 9th digits

function radixSortLSD(array) {
  var max = 0,
    mod = 10,
    dev = 1; //max
  for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    if (array[i] > max) {
      max = array[i];
    }
  }
  // determine the large item length
  var maxDigitLength = (max + '').length;
  for (var i = 0; i < maxDigitLength; i++, dev *= 10, mod *= 10) {
    for (var j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
      var bucket = Math.floor((array[j] % mod) / dev); // Formula to get the significant digit
      if (counter[bucket] == undefined) {
        counter[bucket] = [];
      }
      counter[bucket].push(array[j]);
    }
    var pos = 0;
    for (var j = 0; j < counter.length; j++) {
      var value = undefined;
      if (counter[j] != undefined) {
        while ((value = counter[j].shift()) != undefined) {
          array[pos++] = value;
        }
      }
    }
  }
  console.log("ARRAY: " + array);
};

var sampleArray = [1, 121, 99553435535353534, 345, 0];
radixSortLSD(sampleArray);

0

I encountered radix sort in CRLS 3rd edition section 8.3

The book provided the arcane origins of radix sort. It described the MSD version as antiquated and tricky. It also advised the implementation of the LSD.

Here I provide an implementation of radix sort using this technique.

Let's start by the pseudo-code:

counting sort

/**
 * @param k: the max of input, used to create a range for our buckets
 * @param exp: 1, 10, 100, 1000, ... used to calculate the nth digit
 */
Array.prototype.countingSort = function (k, exp) {
    /* eslint consistent-this:0 */
    /* self of course refers to this array */
    const self = this;

    /**
     * let's say the this[i] = 123, if exp is 100 returns 1, if exp 10 returns 2, if exp is 1 returns 3
     * @param i
     * @returns {*}
     */
    function index(i) {
        if (exp)
            return Math.floor(self[i] / exp) % 10;
        return i;
    }

    const LENGTH = this.length;

    /* create an array of zeroes */
    let C = Array.apply(null, new Array(k)).map(() => 0);
    let B = [];

    for (let i = 0; i < LENGTH; i++)
        C[index(i)]++;

    for (let i = 1; i < k; i++)
        C[i] += C[i - 1];

    for (let i = LENGTH - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        B[--C[index(i)]] = this[i];
    }

    B.forEach((e, i) => {
        self[i] = e
    });
}

And that's the only tricky part, the rest is very simple

Array.prototype.radixSort = function () {
    const MAX = Math.max.apply(null, this);

    /* let's say the max is 1926, we should only use exponents 1, 10, 100, 1000 */
    for (let exp = 1; MAX / exp > 1; exp *= 10) {
        this.countingSort(10, exp);
    }
}

Now here is a how you can test this method

let a = [589, 111, 777, 65, 124, 852, 345, 888, 553, 654, 549, 448, 222, 165];
a.radixSort()
console.log(a);

Finally, as mentionned in the book, this particular algorithm works only because counting-sort is an in-place sorting algorithm, which means that if two elements tie, their order of occurence in the input array is preserved.

0

Radix Sort (LSD)

function radixSort(arr) {
    const base = 10;
    let divider = 1;
    let maxVal = Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;

    while (divider === 1 || divider <= maxVal) {
        const buckets = [...Array(10)].map(() => []);

        for (let val of arr) {
            buckets[Math.floor((val / divider) % base)].push(val);
            maxVal = val > maxVal ? val : maxVal;
        }

        arr = [].concat(...buckets);
        divider *= base;
    }
    return arr;
}

Disclaimer: it works only with positive integers.

  • For mixed negative & positive integers check this version.
  • I avoid using Math.max as it uses a lot of resources for very large arrays.
0

Doing a LSD radix sort via bitwise operations could go something like this:

const initialMask = 0b1111;
const bits = 4;

const getBuckets = () => Array.from(
  { length: (2 * initialMask) + 1 },
  () => [],
);

function radixSort(array) {
  let max = 0;
  array.forEach(n => {
    const abs = Math.abs(n);
    if (abs > max) max = abs;
  });

  if (max >= 0x80000000) {
    throw new Error('cannot perform bitwise operations on numbers >= 0x80000000');
  }

  for (
    let mask = initialMask,
      shifted = 0,
      buckets = getBuckets();
    true;
    mask = (mask << bits),
      shifted = (shifted + bits),
      buckets = getBuckets()
  ) {
    array.forEach(n => {
      const digit = mask & Math.abs(n);
      const bucket = (Math.sign(n) * (digit >> shifted)) + initialMask;
      buckets[bucket].push(n);
    });

    let i = 0;
    buckets.forEach(bucket => bucket.forEach(n => {
      array[i] = n;
      i += 1;
    }));
    if ((max ^ mask) <= mask) break;
  }
}

const getArray = () => Array.from(
  { length: 1e6 },
  () => Math.floor(Math.random() * 0x80000000) * Math.sign(Math.random() - 0.5),
);

const isSorted = array => {
  for (let i = 1; i < array.length; i += 1) {
    if (array[i - 1] > array[i]) return false;
  }
  return true;
}

const radixArray = getArray();
const nativeArray = radixArray.slice();

const radixStart = +new Date();
radixSort(radixArray);
const radixEnd = +new Date();

const nativeStart = +new Date();
nativeArray.sort();
const nativeEnd = +new Date();

document.write(`
  <dl>
    <dt>Sorted array in</dt>
    <dd>${radixEnd - radixStart}ms</dd>
  
    <dt>Properly sorted</dt>
    <dd>${isSorted(radixArray)}</dd>

    <dt>Sorted with Array.prototype.sort in</dt>
    <dd>${nativeEnd - nativeStart}ms</dd>
  </dl>
 `);

What's going on here?

We're sorting by base 8 (0b1111 helps conceptualize the bitwise operations).

We create 0b1111 * 2 + 1 buckets, which is the number of items in the set [-0b1111 … 0b1111]

We use the "mask" to get each base 8 digit of a given number, e.g.

if n = 0b101000101010, n & 0b1111 gives us 0b1010, which is the first base 8 digit of n.

For each iteration, we get n & 0b11110000, then n & 0b111100000000, which isolates each successive base 8 digit.

For n & 0b11110000, we get 0b00100000, from which we want 0b0010, so we perform a right shift by 4 bits. The next iteration would be shifted by 8 bits, so on and so forth.

To account for negative values, we're basically performing two radix sorts simultaneously: the negative values are sorted in reverse, and the positive values are sorted in normal order. If the digit is negative, we say a digit of 7 should be at 0, 6 at 1, 5 at 2, etc.

If it is positive, we say a radix of 7 should be at index 14, 6 at 13, etc.

The check at the end - (max ^ mask) <= mask - determines if or not the mask has taken the most significant digit of the maximum value. If it has, the array is sorted.

Of course, radix sort only can work with integers.

If you need to use numbers larger than 0x80000000, you could do an implementation with strings.

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