I have an entity:

class SomeInfo(
        @NotNull @Pattern(regexp = Constraints.EMAIL_REGEX) var value: String) {
    var id: Long? = null
}

And controller method:

@RequestMapping(value = "/some-info", method = RequestMethod.POST)
public Id create(@Valid @RequestBody SomeInfo someInfo) {
       ...
    }

@Valid annotation doesn't work.

It seems Spring needs a default parameterless constructor and fancy code above becomes in something ugly (but working) like this:

class SomeInfo() {

    constructor(value: String) {
            this.value = value
        }

        @NotNull @Pattern(regexp = Constraints.EMAIL_REGEX) 
        lateinit var value: String

        var id: Long? = null
    }

Any good practice to make it less wordy?

Thanks.

  • You're saying that Spring needs a parameterless constructor but the working code still has just a single parameter constructor. – Michael Apr 9 '16 at 18:53
  • Yes, you're right. Edited. – fasth Apr 11 '16 at 4:08
up vote 34 down vote accepted

Seems Spring needs these annotations to be applied to a field. But Kotlin will apply these annotations to the constructor parameter. Use field: specifier when applying an annotation to make it apply to a field. The following code should work fine for you.

class SomeInfo(
    @field:NotNull
    @field:Pattern(regexp = Constraints.EMAIL_REGEX)
    var value: String
) {
    var id: Long? = null
}

As an alternative to Michal's answer, annotating the getter also works.

class SomeInfo(
    @get:NotNull
    @get:Pattern(regexp = Constraints.EMAIL_REGEX)
    var value: String
) {
    var id: Long? = null
}

The annoying part is, that not using @get: or @field: will annotate the constructor parameter. This is still valid kotlin code (so you don't get an error). It's just useless in these use cases.

  • I tried it and didn't get it working. Do I need some extra configuration or it just works? – ttt Jan 25 at 14:15
  • No, should work out of the box. I am using it in a spring project, so I have the spring-kotlin package which essential modifies spring classes to be automatically "open" classes and "open methods" if they are spring annotated. That might be a site effect that kicks in. – Andreas Sahlbach Jan 26 at 9:51

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