88

I have a situation wherein sometimes when I read a csv from df I get an unwanted index-like column named unnamed:0.

file.csv

,A,B,C
0,1,2,3
1,4,5,6
2,7,8,9

The CSV is read with this:

pd.read_csv('file.csv')

   Unnamed: 0  A  B  C
0           0  1  2  3
1           1  4  5  6
2           2  7  8  9

This is very annoying! Does anyone have an idea on how to get rid of this?

  • If the CSV comes from upstream (where removing it during saving is not an option), you can handle it while reading. Please see this answer. – cs95 Jan 25 at 4:06
126

It's the index column, pass index=False to not write it out, see the docs

Example:

In [37]:
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(5,3), columns=list('abc'))
pd.read_csv(io.StringIO(df.to_csv()))

Out[37]:
   Unnamed: 0         a         b         c
0           0  0.109066 -1.112704 -0.545209
1           1  0.447114  1.525341  0.317252
2           2  0.507495  0.137863  0.886283
3           3  1.452867  1.888363  1.168101
4           4  0.901371 -0.704805  0.088335

compare with:

In [38]:
pd.read_csv(io.StringIO(df.to_csv(index=False)))

Out[38]:
          a         b         c
0  0.109066 -1.112704 -0.545209
1  0.447114  1.525341  0.317252
2  0.507495  0.137863  0.886283
3  1.452867  1.888363  1.168101
4  0.901371 -0.704805  0.088335

You could also optionally tell read_csv that the first column is the index column by passing index_col=0:

In [40]:
pd.read_csv(io.StringIO(df.to_csv()), index_col=0)

Out[40]:
          a         b         c
0  0.109066 -1.112704 -0.545209
1  0.447114  1.525341  0.317252
2  0.507495  0.137863  0.886283
3  1.452867  1.888363  1.168101
4  0.901371 -0.704805  0.088335
  • Thanks EdChum! Annoyance eliminated! To think that I was just reading the docs and looking for this solution. Somehow I was not properly comprehending. – Michael Perdue Apr 9 '16 at 15:51
  • A lot of times the datasets you get from elsewhere already contain this column so it doesn't really help knowing how to produce the "right" dataset using the right parameters. Is there a way to eliminate this column when you load it when it's already there? – Calvin Ku Mar 24 '18 at 9:07
  • 1
    @CalvinKu unfortunately there is no skipcols arg for read_csv, after reading in the csv you could just do df = df.drop(columns=df.columns[0]) or you could just read the columns in first and then pass the cols minus the first column something like cols = pd.read_csv( ....., nrows=1).columns and then re-read again df = pd.read_csv(....., usecols=cols[1:]) this avoids the overhead of reading a superfluous column and then dropping it afterwards – EdChum Mar 24 '18 at 16:39
11

This issue most likely manifests because your CSV was saved along with its RangeIndex (which usually doesn't have a name). The fix would actually need to be done when saving the DataFrame, but this isn't always an option.

Avoiding the Problem: read_csv with index_col argument

IMO, the simplest solution would be to read the unnamed column as the index. Specify an index_col=[0] argument to pd.read_csv, this reads in the first column as the index.

df = pd.DataFrame('x', index=range(5), columns=list('abc'))
df

   a  b  c
0  x  x  x
1  x  x  x
2  x  x  x
3  x  x  x
4  x  x  x

# Save DataFrame to CSV.
df.to_csv('file.csv')

pd.read_csv('file.csv')

   Unnamed: 0  a  b  c
0           0  x  x  x
1           1  x  x  x
2           2  x  x  x
3           3  x  x  x
4           4  x  x  x

# Now try this again, with the extra argument.
pd.read_csv('file.csv', index_col=[0])

   a  b  c
0  x  x  x
1  x  x  x
2  x  x  x
3  x  x  x
4  x  x  x

Note
You could have avoided this in the first place by using index=False when creating the output CSV, if your DataFrame does not have an index to begin with.

df.to_csv('file.csv', index=False)

But as mentioned above, this isn't always an option.


Stopgap Solution: Filtering with str.match

If you cannot modify the code to read/write the CSV file, you can just remove the column by filtering with str.match:

df 

   Unnamed: 0  a  b  c
0           0  x  x  x
1           1  x  x  x
2           2  x  x  x
3           3  x  x  x
4           4  x  x  x

df.columns
# Index(['Unnamed: 0', 'a', 'b', 'c'], dtype='object')

df.columns.str.match('Unnamed')
# array([ True, False, False, False])

df.loc[:, ~df.columns.str.match('Unnamed')]

   a  b  c
0  x  x  x
1  x  x  x
2  x  x  x
3  x  x  x
4  x  x  x
  • 1
    Thanks a lot! That index_col=[0] fix easily solved this annoying problem of 'unnamed:0' and spares code from verbose reinventing the wheel. – user48115 Jul 15 at 5:58
6

Another case that this might be happening is if your data was improperly written to your csv to have each row end with a comma. This will leave you with an unnamed column Unnamed: x at the end of your data when you try to read it into a df.

  • I used usecols=range(0,10) to cut off the unnamed column – Nash Dec 4 '18 at 12:21

protected by cs95 Jan 25 at 4:03

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