332

I've got a parent component:

<parent></parent>

And I want to populate this group with child components:

<parent>
  <child></child>
  <child></child>
  <child></child>
</parent>

Parent template:

<div class="parent">
  <!-- Children goes here -->
  <ng-content></ng-content>
</div>

Child template:

<div class="child">Test</div>

Since parent and child are two separate components, their styles are locked to their own scope.

In my parent component I tried doing:

.parent .child {
  // Styles for child
}

But the .child styles are not getting applied to the child components.

I tried using styleUrls to include the parent's stylesheet into child component to solve the scope issue:

// child.component.ts
styleUrls: [
  './parent.component.css',
  './child.component.css',
]

But that didn't help, also tried the other way by fetching the child stylesheet into parent but that didn't help either.

So how do you style child components that are included into a parent component?

2

20 Answers 20

295

Update - Newest Way

Don't do it, if you can avoid it. As Devon Sans points out in the comments: This feature will most likely be deprecated.

#Update - Newer Way From Angular 4.3.0, all piercing css combinators were deprecated. Angular team introduced a new combinator ::ng-deep (still it is experimental and not the full and final way) as shown below,

DEMO : https://plnkr.co/edit/RBJIszu14o4svHLQt563?p=preview

styles: [
    `
     :host { color: red; }
     
     :host ::ng-deep parent {
       color:blue;
     }
     :host ::ng-deep child{
       color:orange;
     }
     :host ::ng-deep child.class1 {
       color:yellow;
     }
     :host ::ng-deep child.class2{
       color:pink;
     }
    `
],



template: `
      Angular2                                //red
      <parent>                                //blue
          <child></child>                     //orange
          <child class="class1"></child>      //yellow
          <child class="class2"></child>      //pink
      </parent>      
    `

# Old way

You can use encapsulation mode and/or piercing CSS combinators >>>, /deep/ and ::shadow

working example : http://plnkr.co/edit/1RBDGQ?p=preview

styles: [
    `
     :host { color: red; }
     :host >>> parent {
       color:blue;
     }
     :host >>> child{
       color:orange;
     }
     :host >>> child.class1 {
       color:yellow;
     }
     :host >>> child.class2{
       color:pink;
     }
    `
    ],

template: `
  Angular2                                //red
  <parent>                                //blue
      <child></child>                     //orange
      <child class="class1"></child>      //yellow
      <child class="class2"></child>      //pink
  </parent>      
`
11
  • 3
    Piercing CSS combinators are deprecated in Chrome though Jun 29 '17 at 8:20
  • 28
    The angular team plans to drop support of ::ng-deep as well. From their docs: "The shadow-piercing descendant combinator is deprecated and support is being removed from major browsers and tools. As such we plan to drop support in Angular (for all 3 of /deep/, >>> and ::ng-deep). Until then ::ng-deep should be preferred for a broader compatibility with the tools." angular.io/guide/component-styles#deprecated-deep--and-ng-deep.
    – Devon Sams
    Oct 5 '17 at 13:51
  • 7
    As long as this stays as an accepted answer, people will be mislead. ::ng-deep should not be used as @DevonSams points in the comment above. Feb 16 '18 at 14:49
  • 3
    ::ng-deep is now deprecated, I don't recommend using it in future applications
    – Wilt
    Feb 13 '20 at 8:46
  • 38
    Deprecating something without providing an alternative is probably not the best solution.
    – tehlivi
    Feb 14 '20 at 16:44
92

You should NOT use ::ng-deep, it is deprecated. In Angular, the proper way to change the style of children's component from the parent is to use encapsulation (read the warning below to understand the implications):

import { ViewEncapsulation } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
    ....
    encapsulation: ViewEncapsulation.None
})

And then, you will be able to modify the css form your component without a need from ::ng-deep

.mat-sort-header-container {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
}

WARNING: Doing this will make all css rules you write for this component to be global.

In order to limit the scope of your css to this component and his child only, add a css class to the top tag of your component and put your css "inside" this tag:

template:
    <div class='my-component'>
      <child-component class="first">First</child>
    </div>,

Scss file:

.my-component {
  // All your css goes in there in order not to be global
}
13
  • 7
    This is the best answer IMO, as it is actually a viable alternative to the soon-to-be deprecated ::ng-deep. Generally, components have their own selector anyway (<my-component>, <div my-component>, etc.) so there isn't even any need for a wrapper element with a special class. Feb 19 '20 at 12:01
  • 3
    @AlexWalker This might be the best answer for your situation, but worth mentioning that it only answers half of the OP's question afaict: This method allows CSS to propagate as normal from top to bottom, but, by virtue of throwing away ALL encapsulation, doesn't limit that styling to children of a specific parent. If you style the children of parent1 one way and children of parent2 another, those CSS rules will now be fighting each other in both places. That can be mind-numbingly painful (and Angular added encapsulation to avoid it).
    – ruffin
    May 19 '20 at 17:51
  • 1
    @ruffin That's exactly why I added the warning in my answer to understand the implication of using this technique and how to "manually encapsulate" using a top css tag on your component
    – Tonio
    May 20 '20 at 6:57
  • 2
    @Tonio -- Yep, agreed; was replying directly to Alex rather than you. His comment, "so there isn't even any need for a wrapper element with a special class" scared me a little. Maybe for a specific situation, but there's a reason Angular "wastes" time supporting encapsulation. This answer is a workable solution in specific cases, but, as you say, is a potentially dangerous one in general. MatthewB's solution, eg, styles children while keeping encapsulation (but it gets really messy if you have more than one generation of child components).
    – ruffin
    May 20 '20 at 13:48
  • 1
    this is it. Thanks!
    – Gel
    Feb 11 at 15:52
61

UPDATE 3:

::ng-deep is also deprecated which means you should not do this at all anymore. It is unclear how this affects things where you need to override styles in child components from a parent component. To me it seems odd if this gets removed completely because how would this affect things as libraries where you need to override styles in a library component?

Comment if you have any insight in this.

UPDATE 2:

Since /deep/ and all other shadow piercing selectors are now deprecated. Angular dropped ::ng-deep which should be used instead for a broader compatibility.

UPDATE:

If using Angular-CLI you need to use /deep/ instead of >>> or else it will not work.

ORIGINAL:

After going to Angular2's Github page and doing a random search for "style" I found this question: Angular 2 - innerHTML styling

Which said to use something that was added in 2.0.0-beta.10, the >>> and ::shadow selectors.

(>>>) (and the equivalent/deep/) and ::shadow were added in 2.0.0-beta.10. They are similar to the shadow DOM CSS combinators (which are deprecated) and only work with encapsulation: ViewEncapsulation.Emulated which is the default in Angular2. They probably also work with ViewEncapsulation.None but are then only ignored because they are not necessary. These combinators are only an intermediate solution until more advanced features for cross-component styling is supported.

So simply doing:

:host >>> .child {}

In parent's stylesheet file solved the issue. Please note, as stated in the quote above, this solution is only intermediate until more advanced cross-component styling is supported.

1
20

Sadly it appears that the /deep/ selector is deprecated (at least in Chrome) https://www.chromestatus.com/features/6750456638341120

In short it appears there is (currently) no long term solution other than to somehow get your child component to style things dynamically.

You could pass a style object to your child and have it applied via:
<div [attr.style]="styleobject">

Or if you have a specific style you can use something like:
<div [style.background-color]="colorvar">

More discussion related to this: https://github.com/angular/angular/issues/6511

0
16

Had same issue, so if you're using angular2-cli with scss/sass use '/deep/' instead of '>>>', last selector isn't supported yet (but works great with css).

13

If you want to be more targeted to the actual child component than you should do the follow. This way, if other child components share the same class name, they won't be affected.

Plunker: https://plnkr.co/edit/ooBRp3ROk6fbWPuToytO?p=preview

For example:

import {Component, NgModule } from '@angular/core'
import {BrowserModule} from '@angular/platform-browser'

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  template: `
    <div>
      <h2>I'm the host parent</h2>
      <child-component class="target1"></child-component><br/>
      <child-component class="target2"></child-component><br/>
      <child-component class="target3"></child-component><br/>
      <child-component class="target4"></child-component><br/>
      <child-component></child-component><br/>
    </div>
  `,
  styles: [`

  /deep/ child-component.target1 .child-box {
      color: red !important; 
      border: 10px solid red !important;
  }  

  /deep/ child-component.target2 .child-box {
      color: purple !important; 
      border: 10px solid purple !important;
  }  

  /deep/ child-component.target3 .child-box {
      color: orange !important; 
      border: 10px solid orange !important;
  }  

  /* this won't work because the target component is spelled incorrectly */
  /deep/ xxxxchild-component.target4 .child-box {
      color: orange !important; 
      border: 10px solid orange !important;
  }  

  /* this will affect any component that has a class name called .child-box */
  /deep/ .child-box {
      color: blue !important; 
      border: 10px solid blue !important;
  }  


  `]
})
export class App {
}

@Component({
  selector: 'child-component',
  template: `
    <div class="child-box">
      Child: This is some text in a box
    </div>
  `,
  styles: [`
    .child-box {
      color: green;    
      border: 1px solid green;
    }
  `]
})
export class ChildComponent {
}


@NgModule({
  imports: [ BrowserModule ],
  declarations: [ App, ChildComponent ],
  bootstrap: [ App ]
})
export class AppModule {}

Hope this helps!

codematrix

12

You should not write CSS rules for a child component elements in a parent component, since an Angular component is a self-contained entity which should explicitly declare what is available for the outside world. If child layout changes in the future, your styles for that child component elements scattered across other components' SCSS files could easily break, thus making your styling very fragile. That's what ViewEncapsulation is for in the case of CSS. Otherwise, it would be the same if you could assign values to private fields of some class from any other class in Object Oriented Programming.

Therefore, what you should do is to define a set of classes you could apply to the child host element and implement how the child responds to them.

Technically, it could be done as follows:

// child.component.html:
<span class="label-1"></span>

// child.component.scss:
:host.child-color-black {
    .label-1 {
        color: black;
    }
}

:host.child-color-blue {
    .label-1 {
        color: blue ;
    }
}

// parent.component.html:
<child class="child-color-black"></child>
<child class="child-color-blue"></child>

In other words, you use :host pseudo-selector provided by Angular + set of CSS classes to define possible child styles in child component itself. You then have the ability to trigger those styles from outside by applying pre-defined classes to the <child> host element.

7
  • Looks like a good solution, is there a parent.component.scss file? if yes, care to give it? Dec 14 '18 at 10:57
  • @ManoharReddyPoreddy There should be no styling in a parent.component.scss related to the styling of the child component. It's the sole purpose of this approach. Why do you need parent.component.scss? Dec 14 '18 at 15:12
  • Not sure, just know a bit of css. Can you share a full solution on jsbin, or other. Your solution can be a future solution for everyone. Dec 15 '18 at 5:45
  • 3
    @ManoharReddyPoreddy I'd suggest you to try those pieces of code in practice first. Then, if you'd run into any issues, you'd have a specific question which I could answer or advice to look into a specific topic to get some understanding of how to fix your issue. I mentioned ViewEncapsulation just because its default value is what leads to the OP question. You don't have to assign a different ViewEncapsulation for the above code to work. Dec 17 '18 at 17:13
  • 1
    +1 Thank you. Will come back to take this solution in future, settled for ::ng-deep stackoverflow.com/a/36528769/984471 for today. Dec 18 '18 at 9:00
11

Actually there is one more option. Which is rather safe. You can use ViewEncapsulation.None BUT put all your component styles into its tag (aka selector). But anyway always prefer some global style plus encapsulated styles.

Here is modified Denis Rybalka example:

import { Component, ViewEncapsulation } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  selector: 'parent',
  styles: [`
    parent {
      .first {
        color:blue;
      }
      .second {
        color:red;
      }
    }
 `],
 template: `
    <div>
      <child class="first">First</child>
      <child class="second">Second</child>
    </div>`,
  encapsulation: ViewEncapsulation.None,
})
export class ParentComponent  {
  constructor() { }
}
0
7

There are a few options to achieve this in Angular:

1) You can use deep css selectors

:host >>> .childrens {
     color: red;
 }

2) You can also change view encapsulation it's set to Emulated as a default but can be easily changed to Native which uses Shadow DOM native browser implementation, in your case you just need to disable it

For example:`

import { Component, ViewEncapsulation } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  selector: 'parent',
  styles: [`
    .first {
      color:blue;
    }
    .second {
      color:red;
    }
 `],
 template: `
    <div>
      <child class="first">First</child>
      <child class="second">Second</child>
    </div>`,
  encapsulation: ViewEncapsulation.None,
 })
 export class ParentComponent  {
   constructor() {

   }
 }
2
  • 3
    Actually it means that styles affect whole dom, not only child elements. Oct 12 '18 at 11:01
  • this way is totaly deprecatd by angular & chrome Jan 5 at 10:39
6

I find it a lot cleaner to pass an @INPUT variable if you have access to the child component code:

The idea is that the parent tells the child what its state of appearance should be, and the child decides how to display the state. It's a nice architecture

SCSS Way:

.active {
  ::ng-deep md-list-item {
    background-color: #eee;
  }
}

Better way: - use selected variable:

<md-list>
    <a
            *ngFor="let convo of conversations"
            routerLink="/conversations/{{convo.id}}/messages"
            #rla="routerLinkActive"
            routerLinkActive="active">
        <app-conversation
                [selected]="rla.isActive"
                [convo]="convo"></app-conversation>
    </a>
</md-list>
1
  • 2
    Also hard to maintain, especially for recursive components. Jun 14 '19 at 19:21
5

As of today (Angular 9), Angular uses a Shadow DOM to display the components as custom HTML elements. One elegant way to style those custom elements might be using custom CSS variables. Here is a generic example:

class ChildElement extends HTMLElement {
  constructor() {
    super();
    
    var shadow = this.attachShadow({mode: 'open'});
    var wrapper = document.createElement('div');
    wrapper.setAttribute('class', 'wrapper');
    
    // Create some CSS to apply to the shadow dom
    var style = document.createElement('style');
    
    style.textContent = `
    
      /* Here we define the default value for the variable --background-clr */
      :host {
        --background-clr: green;
      }
      
      .wrapper {
        width: 100px;
        height: 100px;
        background-color: var(--background-clr);
        border: 1px solid red;
      }
    `;
    
    shadow.appendChild(style);
    shadow.appendChild(wrapper);
  }
}

// Define the new element
customElements.define('child-element', ChildElement);
/* CSS CODE */

/* This element is referred as :host from the point of view of the custom element. Commenting out this CSS will result in the background to be green, as defined in the custom element */

child-element {
  --background-clr: yellow; 
}
<div>
  <child-element></child-element>
</div>

As we can see from the above code, we create a custom element, just like Angular would do for us with every component, and then we override the variable responsible for the background color within the shadow root of the custom element, from the global scope.

In an Angular app, this might be something like:

parent.component.scss

child-element {
  --background-clr: yellow;
}

child-element.component.scss

:host {
  --background-clr: green;
}

.wrapper {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: var(--background-clr);
  border: 1px solid red;
}
5

Since /deep/, >>>, and ::ng-deep are all deprecated. The best approach is to use the following in your child component styling

:host-context(.theme-light) h2 {
  background-color: #eef;
}

This will look for the theme-light in any of the ancestors of your child component. See docs here: https://angular.io/guide/component-styles#host-context

1

The quick answer is you shouldn't be doing this, at all. It breaks component encapsulation and undermines the benefit you're getting from self-contained components. Consider passing a prop flag to the child component, it can then decide itself how to render differently or apply different CSS, if necessary.

<parent>
  <child [foo]="bar"></child>
</parent>

Angular is deprecating all ways of affecting child styles from parents.

https://angular.io/guide/component-styles#deprecated-deep--and-ng-deep

2
  • Well they've said explicitly in their docs they're doing it eventually, which I guess means they will. I agree though, not happening anytime soon. Mar 1 '18 at 11:05
  • So they will pretty much make their own Materials library useless. I've never been able to use a default theme in any library since each customer require their own design. Usually you just want the functionality of a component. I can't say I understand their overall logic behind this decision. Mar 1 '18 at 11:09
1

i also had this problem and didnt wanted to use deprecated solution so i ended up with:

in parrent

 <dynamic-table
  ContainerCustomStyle='width: 400px;'
  >
 </dynamic-Table>

child component

@Input() ContainerCustomStyle: string;

in child in html div

 <div class="container mat-elevation-z8"
 [style]='GetStyle(ContainerCustomStyle)' >

and in code

constructor(private sanitizer: DomSanitizer) {  }

  GetStyle(c) {
    if (isNullOrUndefined(c)) { return null; }
    return  this.sanitizer.bypassSecurityTrustStyle(c);
  }

works like expected and should not be deprecated ;)

2
  • Interesting! I ended up with something similar (for now). Where do you get DomSanitizer from? Edit: Found it: angular.io/api/platform-browser/DomSanitizer
    – Zaphoid
    Apr 23 '19 at 15:27
  • yep in v7 it is native you just have to request injection of it in constructor. ;) , in older i have no idea if it existed - i started from v7 ;)
    – d00lar
    Apr 24 '19 at 19:25
1

For assigning an element's class in a child component you can simply use an @Input string in the child's component and use it as an expression inside the template. Here is an example of something we did to change the icon and button type in a shared Bootstrap loading button component, without affecting how it was already used throughout the codebase:

app-loading-button.component.html (child)

<button class="btn {{additionalClasses}}">...</button>

app-loading-button.component.ts

@Input() additionalClasses: string;

parent.html

<app-loading-button additionalClasses="fa fa-download btn-secondary">...</app-loading-button>
1
  • 1
    I think this is better: <button class="btn" [ngClass]="additionalClasses">...</button>
    – Maico
    Aug 12 '20 at 16:38
1

What I prefer to achieve this is the following:

use @Component to add css class to host element and set encapsulation to none. Then reference that class which was added to the host within the components style.css.scss This will allow us to declare styles which will only affect ourselves and our children within scope of our class. f.e.

@Component({
  selector: 'my-component',
  templateUrl: './my-component.page.html',
  styleUrls: ['./my-component.page.scss'],
  host: {
    class: 'my-component-class'
  },
  encapsulation: ViewEncapsulation.None
})

in combination with the following css (my-component.page.scss)

// refer ourselves so we are allowed to overwrite children but not global styles
.my-component-class {
  // will effect direct h1 nodes within template and all h1 elements within child components of the 
  h1 {
    color: red;
  }
}
// without class "scope" will affect all h1 elements globally
h1 {
  color: blue;
}
0

As the internet updates I've come across a solution.

First some caveats.

  1. Still don't do it. To clarify, I wouldn't plan on child components allowing you to style them. SOC. If you as the component designer want to allow this then all the more power to you.
  2. If your child doesn't live in the shadow dom then this won't work for you.
  3. If you have to support a browser that can't have a shadow dom then this also won't work for you.

First, mark your child component's encapsulation as shadow so it renders in the actual shadow dom. Second, add the part attribute to the element you wish to allow the parent to style. In your parent's component stylesheet you can use the ::part() method to access

-1

I propose an example to make it more clear, since angular.io/guide/component-styles states:

The shadow-piercing descendant combinator is deprecated and support is being removed from major browsers and tools. As such we plan to drop support in Angular (for all 3 of /deep/, >>> and ::ng-deep). Until then ::ng-deep should be preferred for a broader compatibility with the tools.

On app.component.scss, import your *.scss if needed. _colors.scss has some common color values:

$button_ripple_red: #A41E34;
$button_ripple_white_text: #FFF;

Apply a rule to all components

All the buttons having btn-red class will be styled.

@import `./theme/sass/_colors`;

// red background and white text
:host /deep/ button.red-btn {
    color: $button_ripple_white_text;
    background: $button_ripple_red;
}

Apply a rule to a single component

All the buttons having btn-red class on app-login component will be styled.

@import `./theme/sass/_colors`;

/deep/ app-login button.red-btn {
    color: $button_ripple_white_text;
    background: $button_ripple_red;
}
-2

I have solved it outside Angular. I have defined a shared scss that I'm importing to my children.

shared.scss

%cell {
  color: #333333;
  background: #eee;
  font-size: 13px;
  font-weight: 600;
}

child.scss

@import 'styles.scss';
.cell {
  @extend %cell;
}

My proposed approach is a way how to solve the problem the OP has asked about. As mentioned at multiple occasions, ::ng-deep, :ng-host will get depreciated and disabling encapsulation is just too much of a code leakage, in my view.

0
-2

let 'parent' be the class-name of parent and 'child' be the class-name of child

.parent .child{
//css definition for child inside parent components
} 

you can use this format to define CSS format to 'child' component inside the 'parent'

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