I have a simple node.js program running on my machine and I want to get local IP address of PC on which is my program running. How do I get it with node.js?

35 Answers 35

up vote 313 down vote accepted
'use strict';

var os = require('os');
var ifaces = os.networkInterfaces();

Object.keys(ifaces).forEach(function (ifname) {
  var alias = 0;

  ifaces[ifname].forEach(function (iface) {
    if ('IPv4' !== iface.family || iface.internal !== false) {
      // skip over internal (i.e. 127.0.0.1) and non-ipv4 addresses
      return;
    }

    if (alias >= 1) {
      // this single interface has multiple ipv4 addresses
      console.log(ifname + ':' + alias, iface.address);
    } else {
      // this interface has only one ipv4 adress
      console.log(ifname, iface.address);
    }
    ++alias;
  });
});

// en0 192.168.1.101
// eth0 10.0.0.101
  • 55
    that could use some commenting. – Hermann Ingjaldsson Nov 6 '12 at 16:16
  • 3
    docs here: nodejs.org/api/os.html#os_os_networkinterfaces – jpillora May 21 '13 at 0:02
  • 13
    var _ = require('underscore'); var ip = _.chain(require('os').networkInterfaces()).flatten().filter(function(val){ return (val.family == 'IPv4' && val.internal == false) }).pluck('address').first().value(); console.log(ip) – Carter Cole Sep 9 '13 at 15:27
  • 8
    guess there's an alias++ missing in the inner loop – Matthias Mar 2 '15 at 14:57
  • 1
    @CarterCole you need an extra call to .values() before flatten. – Guido García Mar 4 '15 at 9:41

os.networkInterfaces as of right now doesn't work on windows. Running programs to parse the results seems a bit iffy. Here's what I use.

require('dns').lookup(require('os').hostname(), function (err, add, fam) {
  console.log('addr: '+add);
})

This should return your first network interface local ip.

  • 3
    @HermannIngjaldsson: This is not a very thoroughly informative criticism. Could you be more specific? Maybe take the example code and put it into a new question providing more details and asking why it doesn't work? – Xedecimal Nov 7 '12 at 20:11
  • 14
    os.networkInterfaces() works on Windows now. – josh3736 Dec 17 '12 at 19:18
  • 6
    It is not always a good idea to use the DNS lookup, as it can return wrong information (i.e. cached data). Using 'os.networkInterfaces' is a better idea in my opinion. – Guido García Feb 28 '13 at 19:55
  • 9
    first adress is 127.0.0.1 ...great.... :-/ – Offirmo Mar 26 '14 at 0:08
  • 1
    Using DNS works if your server has a dns entry somewhere. However in a lot of applications there isn't a dns entry (e.g. my laptop). os.networkInterfaces() is probably the way to go. – Jeff Whiting Feb 6 '15 at 20:54

https://github.com/indutny/node-ip

var ip = require("ip");
console.dir ( ip.address() );
  • 47
    Sometimes it does make sense to scroll to the end of all the answers. – cburgmer Feb 19 '16 at 11:36
  • @Uri this is what the question asks for – Seb Nov 2 '16 at 16:06
  • 6
    @majidarif i don't recognize that as a valid excuse for poor documentation – Michael Feb 15 '17 at 15:11
  • 2
    This works incredibly well. Getting the IP address is literally a one-liner. Excellent. – EvSunWoodard Jul 25 '17 at 20:41
  • 3
    It doesn't give you the IP address of all the adapters. If you have Docker installed, it gives the vEthernet docker address instead of your actual Ethernet address – TetraDev Dec 19 '17 at 21:52

Any IP of your machine you can find by using the os module - and that's native to NodeJS

var os = require( 'os' );

var networkInterfaces = os.networkInterfaces( );

console.log( networkInterfaces );

All you need to do is call os.networkInterfaces() and you'll get an easy manageable list - easier than running ifconfig by leagues

http://nodejs.org/api/os.html#os_os_networkinterfaces

Best

Edoardo

  • 6
    Awesome answer. var ip = networkInterfaces['eth0'][0]['address'] – nathanengineer Dec 11 '14 at 8:13
  • while this seems great because its simple, its actual effectiveness probably depends on your network configuration. For example, there's no eth0 on the default configuration of OS X, it's en0. – ccnokes Jan 2 '15 at 19:49
  • 1
    Works for me. var address = networkInterfaces['venet0:0'][0].address – Antoine Oct 2 '15 at 20:24
  • weird. on SunOS 5.11 this call returns an empty object – Michael Jan 29 '17 at 21:34

Here is a snippet of node.js code that will parse the output of ifconfig and (asynchronously) return the first IP address found:

(tested on MacOS Snow Leopard only; hope it works on linux too)

var getNetworkIP = (function () {
    var ignoreRE = /^(127\.0\.0\.1|::1|fe80(:1)?::1(%.*)?)$/i;

    var exec = require('child_process').exec;
    var cached;    
    var command;
    var filterRE;

    switch (process.platform) {
    // TODO: implement for OSs without ifconfig command
    case 'darwin':
         command = 'ifconfig';
         filterRE = /\binet\s+([^\s]+)/g;
         // filterRE = /\binet6\s+([^\s]+)/g; // IPv6
         break;
    default:
         command = 'ifconfig';
         filterRE = /\binet\b[^:]+:\s*([^\s]+)/g;
         // filterRE = /\binet6[^:]+:\s*([^\s]+)/g; // IPv6
         break;
    }

    return function (callback, bypassCache) {
         // get cached value
        if (cached && !bypassCache) {
            callback(null, cached);
            return;
        }
        // system call
        exec(command, function (error, stdout, sterr) {
            var ips = [];
            // extract IPs
            var matches = stdout.match(filterRE);
            // JS has no lookbehind REs, so we need a trick
            for (var i = 0; i < matches.length; i++) {
                ips.push(matches[i].replace(filterRE, '$1'));
            }

            // filter BS
            for (var i = 0, l = ips.length; i < l; i++) {
                if (!ignoreRE.test(ips[i])) {
                    //if (!error) {
                        cached = ips[i];
                    //}
                    callback(error, ips[i]);
                    return;
                }
            }
            // nothing found
            callback(error, null);
        });
    };
})();

Usage example:

getNetworkIP(function (error, ip) {
    console.log(ip);
    if (error) {
        console.log('error:', error);
    }
}, false);

If the second parameter is true, the function will exec a system call every time; otherwise the cached value is used.


Updated version

Returns an array of all local network addresses.

Tested on Ubuntu 11.04 and Windows XP 32

var getNetworkIPs = (function () {
    var ignoreRE = /^(127\.0\.0\.1|::1|fe80(:1)?::1(%.*)?)$/i;

    var exec = require('child_process').exec;
    var cached;
    var command;
    var filterRE;

    switch (process.platform) {
    case 'win32':
    //case 'win64': // TODO: test
        command = 'ipconfig';
        filterRE = /\bIPv[46][^:\r\n]+:\s*([^\s]+)/g;
        break;
    case 'darwin':
        command = 'ifconfig';
        filterRE = /\binet\s+([^\s]+)/g;
        // filterRE = /\binet6\s+([^\s]+)/g; // IPv6
        break;
    default:
        command = 'ifconfig';
        filterRE = /\binet\b[^:]+:\s*([^\s]+)/g;
        // filterRE = /\binet6[^:]+:\s*([^\s]+)/g; // IPv6
        break;
    }

    return function (callback, bypassCache) {
        if (cached && !bypassCache) {
            callback(null, cached);
            return;
        }
        // system call
        exec(command, function (error, stdout, sterr) {
            cached = [];
            var ip;
            var matches = stdout.match(filterRE) || [];
            //if (!error) {
            for (var i = 0; i < matches.length; i++) {
                ip = matches[i].replace(filterRE, '$1')
                if (!ignoreRE.test(ip)) {
                    cached.push(ip);
                }
            }
            //}
            callback(error, cached);
        });
    };
})();

Usage Example for updated version

getNetworkIPs(function (error, ip) {
console.log(ip);
if (error) {
    console.log('error:', error);
}
}, false);
  • sure... works on linux (tested on ubuntu)... – xpepermint Dec 3 '11 at 21:35
  • Tested just now on OSX Lion, perfect. Thanks so much! – T3db0t May 3 '12 at 21:49
  • I had to remove the hyphen after the word "IP" in your Windows regexp, because my output didn't have the hyphen (I'm using Windows XP 32-bit). I don't know if that was a typo or if your Windows version really outputs a hyphen after "IP", but just to be on the safe side, I suppose it can be made optional: filterRE = /\bIP-?[^:\r\n]+:\s*([^\s]+)/g;. Aside from that, great script, a true lifesaver. Many thanks! – jSepia Jul 6 '12 at 18:14
  • @jSepia: That's probably a localization thing. German Windows prints "IP-Adresse" ;) – user123444555621 Jul 6 '12 at 18:19
  • Fair enough, but now you broke it again :p My ipconfig output doesn't include "v4" nor "v6", that seems to be a Vista/7 thing (see technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb726952.aspx ) – jSepia Jul 6 '12 at 23:40

Here's my utility method for getting the local IP address, assuming you are looking for an IPv4 address and the machine only has one real network interface. It could easily be refactored to return an array of IPs for multi-interface machines.

function getIPAddress() {
  var interfaces = require('os').networkInterfaces();
  for (var devName in interfaces) {
    var iface = interfaces[devName];

    for (var i = 0; i < iface.length; i++) {
      var alias = iface[i];
      if (alias.family === 'IPv4' && alias.address !== '127.0.0.1' && !alias.internal)
        return alias.address;
    }
  }

  return '0.0.0.0';
}
  • Coffee version: getLocalIP = (interfaceName = "en0",version = "IPv4")-> iface = require('os').networkInterfaces()[interfaceName] for alias in iface if (alias.family == version && !alias.internal) return alias.address return "0.0.0.0" – Jay Mar 24 '15 at 20:58

Calling ifconfig is very platform-dependent, and the networking layer does know what ip addresses a socket is on, so best is to ask it. Node doesn't expose a direct method of doing this, but you can open any socket, and ask what local IP address is in use. For example, opening a socket to www.google.com:

var net = require('net');
function getNetworkIP(callback) {
  var socket = net.createConnection(80, 'www.google.com');
  socket.on('connect', function() {
    callback(undefined, socket.address().address);
    socket.end();
  });
  socket.on('error', function(e) {
    callback(e, 'error');
  });
}

Usage case:

getNetworkIP(function (error, ip) {
    console.log(ip);
    if (error) {
        console.log('error:', error);
    }
});
  • In case you're wondering - this does not necessarily get the public IP address that the world sees. – artur Sep 21 '11 at 16:05
  • Would be a nice solution if it didn't depend on internet connection and its speed.. – Jacob R Nov 1 '11 at 10:21
  • In my instance this solution is perfect, as I need to know the IP of the interface a particular request goes out on. – radicand Oct 18 '13 at 5:05

Install a module called ip like

npm install ip

then use this code.

var ip = require("ip");
console.log( ip.address() );

Your local IP is always 127.0.0.1.

Then there is the network IP, which you can get from ifconfig (*nix) or ipconfig (win). This is only useful within the local network.

Then there is your external/public IP, which you can only get if you can somehow ask the router for it, or you can setup an external service which returns the client IP address whenever it gets a request. There are also other such services in existence, like whatismyip.com.

In some cases (for instance if you have a WAN connection) the network IP and the public IP are the same, and can both be used externally to reach your computer.

If your network and public IPs are different, you may need to have your network router forward all incoming connections to your network ip.


Update 2013:

There's a new way of doing this now, you can check the socket object of your connection for a property called localAddress, e.g. net.socket.localAddress. It returns the address on your end of the socket.

Easiest way is to just open a random port and listen on it, then get your address and close the socket.


Update 2015:

The previous doesn't work anymore.

  • Does that mean that to get the network address in nodejs you need to make a system call to ifconfig or ipconfig and parse the response string? – user123444555621 Sep 18 '10 at 8:38
  • @Pumbaa80 - Pretty much, unless your network card has some drivers you can call. Also if you have several network cards (or adapters, like hamachi), there is no way you can just call a function of sorts and get one IP which is THE IP. So parsing it and interpreting the output of of ifconfig is pretty much the only way. – Tor Valamo Sep 18 '10 at 17:25
  • It looks like net.socket returns undefined as of 2015, so the "new way of doing this" doesn't work anymore. There is a net.Socket, but it does not have a localAddress property. – trysis Apr 9 '15 at 16:40

The correct one liner for both underscore and lodash is:

var ip = require('underscore')
    .chain(require('os').networkInterfaces())
    .values()
    .flatten()
    .find({family: 'IPv4', internal: false})
    .value()
    .address;
  • 3
    You can use: .find({family: 'IPv4', internal: false}) as well for a shorter more elegant code – dcohenb Mar 27 '16 at 11:16

use npm ip module

var ip = require('ip');

console.log(ip.address());

> '192.168.0.117'

Here's a simplified version in vanilla javascript to obtain a single ip:

function getServerIp() {

  var os = require('os');
  var ifaces = os.networkInterfaces();
  var values = Object.keys(ifaces).map(function(name) {
    return ifaces[name];
  });
  values = [].concat.apply([], values).filter(function(val){ 
    return val.family == 'IPv4' && val.internal == false; 
  });

  return values.length ? values[0].address : '0.0.0.0';
}

For anyone interested in brevity, here are some "one-liners" that do not require plugins/dependencies that aren't part of a standard Node installation:

Public IPv4 and IPv6 of eth0 as an Array:

var ips = require('os').networkInterfaces().eth0.map(function(interface) { 
    return interface.address;
});

First Public IP of eth0 (usually IPv4) as String:

var ip = require('os').networkInterfaces().eth0[0].address;
  • Keep in mind that these one-liners are platform specific. On OS X, I have en0 and en1 for ethernet and wifi. On Windows, I have Local Area Connection and Wireless Network Connection. – xverges Jul 29 '13 at 10:39
  • If you want to know about your public remote IP (On OS X), use: var ip = require('os').networkInterfaces().en0[1].address; – Marcelo dos Santos Apr 26 '16 at 13:47

for Linux and MacOS uses, if you want to get your IPs by a synchronous way, try this.

var ips = require('child_process').execSync("ifconfig | grep inet | grep -v inet6 | awk '{gsub(/addr:/,\"\");print $2}'").toString().trim().split("\n");
console.log(ips);

the result will be something like this.

[ '192.168.3.2', '192.168.2.1' ]

Google directed me to this question while searching for "node.js get server ip", so let's give an alternative answer for those who are trying to achieve this in their node.js server program (may be the case of the original poster).

In the most trivial case where the server is bound to only one IP address, there should be no need to determine the IP address since we already know to which address we bound it (eg. second parameter passed to the listen() function).

In the less trivial case where the server is bound to multiple IPs addresses, we may need to determine the IP address of the interface to which a client connected. And as briefly suggested by Tor Valamo, nowadays, we can easily get this information from the connected socket and its localAddress property.

For example, if the program is a web server:

var http = require("http")

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    console.log(req.socket.localAddress)
    res.end(req.socket.localAddress)
}).listen(8000)

And if it's a generic TCP server:

var net = require("net")

net.createServer(function (socket) {
    console.log(socket.localAddress)
    socket.end(socket.localAddress)
}).listen(8000)

When running a server program, this solution offers very high portability, accuracy and efficiency.

For more details, see:

Based on a comment above, here's what's working for the current version of Node:

var os = require('os');
var _ = require('lodash');

var ip = _.chain(os.networkInterfaces())
  .values()
  .flatten()
  .filter(function(val) {
    return (val.family == 'IPv4' && val.internal == false)
  })
  .pluck('address')
  .first()
  .value();

The comment on one of the answers above was missing the call to values(). It looks like os.networkInterfaces() now returns an object instead of an array.

  • 1
    I <3 lodash. Especially lodash golf! The _.chain(..) can be re-written as _(...), the .filter(..) can be re-written as .where({family: 'IPv4', internal: false}), and you can drop the final value() because .first() does it for you when chaining. – Ryan Graham Jun 17 '15 at 22:38

Here is a variation of the above examples. It takes care to filter out vMware interfaces etc. If you don't pass an index it returns all addresses otherwise you may want to set it default to 0 then just pass null to get all, but you'll sort that out. You could also pass in another arg for the regex filter if so inclined to add

    function getAddress(idx) {

    var addresses = [],
        interfaces = os.networkInterfaces(),
        name, ifaces, iface;

    for (name in interfaces) {
        if(interfaces.hasOwnProperty(name)){
            ifaces = interfaces[name];
            if(!/(loopback|vmware|internal)/gi.test(name)){
                for (var i = 0; i < ifaces.length; i++) {
                    iface = ifaces[i];
                    if (iface.family === 'IPv4' &&  !iface.internal && iface.address !== '127.0.0.1') {
                        addresses.push(iface.address);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    // if an index is passed only return it.
    if(idx >= 0)
        return addresses[idx];
    return addresses;
}

I wrote a Node.js module that determines your local IP address by looking at which network interface contains your default gateway.

This is more reliable than picking an interface from os.networkInterfaces() or DNS lookups of the hostname. It is able to ignore VMware virtual interfaces, loopback, and VPN interfaces, and it works on Windows, Linux, Mac OS, and FreeBSD. Under the hood, it executes route.exe or netstat and parses the output.

var localIpV4Address = require("local-ipv4-address");

localIpV4Address().then(function(ipAddress){
    console.log("My IP address is " + ipAddress);
    // My IP address is 10.4.4.137 
});
  • shame it doesn't work on windows when the language is not set to english :( – Javier G. Apr 14 '17 at 13:22
  • Thanks for reporting this bug, @JavierG! I have published version 0.0.2 which should fix it. – Ben Hutchison Apr 22 '17 at 9:31

All I know is I wanted the IP address beginning with 192.168.. This code will give you that:

function getLocalIp() {
    const os = require('os');

    for(let addresses of Object.values(os.networkInterfaces())) {
        for(let add of addresses) {
            if(add.address.startsWith('192.168.')) {
                return add.address;
            }
        }
    }
}

Of course you can just change the numbers if you're looking for a different one.

If you're into the whole brevity thing, here it is using lodash:

var os = require('os');
var _ = require('lodash');
var firstLocalIp = _(os.networkInterfaces()).values().flatten().where({ family: 'IPv4', internal: false }).pluck('address').first();

console.log('First local IPv4 address is ' + firstLocalIp);

One liner for MAC os first localhost address only.

When developing apps on mac os, and want to test it on the phone, and need your app to pick the localhost ip automatically.

require('os').networkInterfaces().en0.find(elm=>elm.family=='IPv4').address

This is just to mention how you can find out the ip address automatically. To test this you can go to terminal hit

node
os.networkInterfaces().en0.find(elm=>elm.family=='IPv4').address

output will be your localhost ip Address.

I'm using node.js 0.6.5

$ node -v
v0.6.5

Here is what I do

var util = require('util');
var exec = require('child_process').exec;
function puts(error, stdout, stderr) {
        util.puts(stdout);
}
exec("hostname -i", puts);
  • 1
    this delivers 127.0.0.1 - not exactly what I am looking for... – andreas Oct 15 '13 at 8:35
  • This works with hostname -I (uppercase i). It returns a list of all assigned IP addresses of the machine. The first IP address is what you need. That IP is the one attached to the current interface that is up. – blueren Sep 6 at 6:26

Here is a multi-ip version of jhurliman's answer above:

function getIPAddresses() {

    var ipAddresses = [];

    var interfaces = require('os').networkInterfaces();
    for (var devName in interfaces) {
        var iface = interfaces[devName];
        for (var i = 0; i < iface.length; i++) {
            var alias = iface[i];
            if (alias.family === 'IPv4' && alias.address !== '127.0.0.1' && !alias.internal) {
                ipAddresses.push(alias.address);
            }
        }
    }

    return ipAddresses;
}

I realise this is an old thread, but I'd like to offer an improvement on the top answer for the following reasons:

  • Code should be as self explanatory as possible.
  • Enumerating over an array using for...in... should be avoided.
  • for...in... enumeration should be validated to ensure the object's being enumerated over contains the property you're looking for. As javsacript is loosely typed and the for...in... can be handed any arbitory object to handle; it's safer to validate the property we're looking for is available.

    var os = require('os'),
        interfaces = os.networkInterfaces(),
        address,
        addresses = [],
        i,
        l,
        interfaceId,
        interfaceArray;
    
    for (interfaceId in interfaces) {
        if (interfaces.hasOwnProperty(interfaceId)) {
            interfaceArray = interfaces[interfaceId];
            l = interfaceArray.length;
    
            for (i = 0; i < l; i += 1) {
    
                address = interfaceArray[i];
    
                if (address.family === 'IPv4' && !address.internal) {
                    addresses.push(address.address);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
    console.log(addresses);
    

hope this helps

var os = require( 'os' );
var networkInterfaces = os.networkInterfaces( );
var arr = networkInterfaces['Local Area Connection 3']
var ip = arr[1].address;
  • npm install ip // install the module var ip = require('ip'); // require the module ip.address() // my ip address – flaalf May 11 '15 at 17:46

Here's my variant that allows getting both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses in a portable manner:

/**
 * Collects information about the local IPv4/IPv6 addresses of
 * every network interface on the local computer.
 * Returns an object with the network interface name as the first-level key and
 * "IPv4" or "IPv6" as the second-level key.
 * For example you can use getLocalIPs().eth0.IPv6 to get the IPv6 address
 * (as string) of eth0
 */
getLocalIPs = function () {
    var addrInfo, ifaceDetails, _len;
    var localIPInfo = {};
    //Get the network interfaces
    var networkInterfaces = require('os').networkInterfaces();
    //Iterate over the network interfaces
    for (var ifaceName in networkInterfaces) {
        ifaceDetails = networkInterfaces[ifaceName];
        //Iterate over all interface details
        for (var _i = 0, _len = ifaceDetails.length; _i < _len; _i++) {
            addrInfo = ifaceDetails[_i];
            if (addrInfo.family === 'IPv4') {
                //Extract the IPv4 address
                if (!localIPInfo[ifaceName]) {
                    localIPInfo[ifaceName] = {};
                }
                localIPInfo[ifaceName].IPv4 = addrInfo.address;
            } else if (addrInfo.family === 'IPv6') {
                //Extract the IPv6 address
                if (!localIPInfo[ifaceName]) {
                    localIPInfo[ifaceName] = {};
                }
                localIPInfo[ifaceName].IPv6 = addrInfo.address;
            }
        }
    }
    return localIPInfo;
};

Here's a CoffeeScript version of the same function:

getLocalIPs = () =>
    ###
    Collects information about the local IPv4/IPv6 addresses of
      every network interface on the local computer.
    Returns an object with the network interface name as the first-level key and
      "IPv4" or "IPv6" as the second-level key.
    For example you can use getLocalIPs().eth0.IPv6 to get the IPv6 address
      (as string) of eth0
    ###
    networkInterfaces = require('os').networkInterfaces();
    localIPInfo = {}
    for ifaceName, ifaceDetails of networkInterfaces
        for addrInfo in ifaceDetails
            if addrInfo.family=='IPv4'
                if !localIPInfo[ifaceName]
                    localIPInfo[ifaceName] = {}
                localIPInfo[ifaceName].IPv4 = addrInfo.address
            else if addrInfo.family=='IPv6'
                if !localIPInfo[ifaceName]
                    localIPInfo[ifaceName] = {}
                localIPInfo[ifaceName].IPv6 = addrInfo.address
    return localIPInfo

Example output for console.log(getLocalIPs())

{ lo: { IPv4: '127.0.0.1', IPv6: '::1' },
  wlan0: { IPv4: '192.168.178.21', IPv6: 'fe80::aa1a:2eee:feba:1c39' },
  tap0: { IPv4: '10.1.1.7', IPv6: 'fe80::ddf1:a9a1:1242:bc9b' } }

Similar to other answers but more succinct:

'use strict';

const interfaces = require('os').networkInterfaces();

const addresses = Object.keys(interfaces)
  .reduce((results, name) => results.concat(interfaces[name]), [])
  .filter((iface) => iface.family === 'IPv4' && !iface.internal)
  .map((iface) => iface.address);

Here's a neat little one-liner for you which does this functionally:

const ni = require('os').networkInterfaces();
Object
  .keys(ni)
  .map(interf =>
    ni[interf].map(o => !o.internal && o.family === 'IPv4' && o.address))
  .reduce((a, b) => a.concat(b))
  .filter(o => o)
  [0];

I was able to do this using just node js

As Node JS

var os = require( 'os' );
var networkInterfaces = Object.values(os.networkInterfaces())
    .reduce((r,a)=>{
        r = r.concat(a)
        return r;
    }, [])
    .filter(({family, address}) => {
        return family.toLowerCase().indexOf('v4') >= 0 &&
            address !== '127.0.0.1'
    })
    .map(({address}) => address);
var ipAddresses = networkInterfaces.join(', ')
console.log(ipAddresses);

As bash script (needs node js installed)

function ifconfig2 ()
{
    node -e """
        var os = require( 'os' );
        var networkInterfaces = Object.values(os.networkInterfaces())
            .reduce((r,a)=>{
                r = r.concat(a)
                return r;
            }, [])
            .filter(({family, address}) => {
                return family.toLowerCase().indexOf('v4') >= 0 &&
                    address !== '127.0.0.1'
            })
            .map(({address}) => address);
        var ipAddresses = networkInterfaces.join(', ')
        console.log(ipAddresses);
    """
}

Here's a variation that allows you to get local ip address (tested on Mac and Win):


var
    // Local ip address that we're trying to calculate
    address
    // Provides a few basic operating-system related utility functions (built-in)
    ,os = require('os')
    // Network interfaces
    ,ifaces = os.networkInterfaces();


// Iterate over interfaces ...
for (var dev in ifaces) {

    // ... and find the one that matches the criteria
    var iface = ifaces[dev].filter(function(details) {
        return details.family === 'IPv4' && details.internal === false;
    });

    if(iface.length > 0) address = iface[0].address;
}

// Print the result
console.log(address); // 10.25.10.147

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