63

Consider the array [1,2,3,4]. How can I rearrange the array item to new position.

For example:

put 3 into position 4 [1,2,4,3]

put 4 in to position 1 [4,1,2,3]

put 2 into position 3 [1,3,2,4].

14 Answers 14

122

Swift 3.0+:

let element = arr.remove(at: 3)
arr.insert(element, at: 2)

and in function form:

func rearrange<T>(array: Array<T>, fromIndex: Int, toIndex: Int) -> Array<T>{
    var arr = array
    let element = arr.remove(at: fromIndex)
    arr.insert(element, at: toIndex)

    return arr
}

Swift 2.0:

This puts 3 into position 4.

let element = arr.removeAtIndex(3)
arr.insert(element, atIndex: 2)

You can even make a general function:

func rearrange<T>(array: Array<T>, fromIndex: Int, toIndex: Int) -> Array<T>{
    var arr = array
    let element = arr.removeAtIndex(fromIndex)
    arr.insert(element, atIndex: toIndex)

    return arr
}

The var arr is needed here, because you can't mutate the input parameter without specifying it to be in-out. In our case however we get a pure functions with no side effects, which is a lot easier to reason with, in my opinion. You could then call it like this:

let arr = [1,2,3,4]
rearrange(arr, fromIndex: 2, toIndex: 0) //[3,1,2,4]
| improve this answer | |
  • Does swift handle this kind of remove and insert efficiently? – Morty Choi Apr 11 '16 at 7:01
  • For most cases, yes, if you do it a LOT, it might give you some issues, but I wouldn't worry about it, unless it's a real bottleneck in your app :) – Luka Jacobowitz Apr 11 '16 at 7:04
  • Shouldn't this last line read fromIndex:2 ?. 3 is the 3rd element at the SECOND index – TimWhiting Dec 4 '16 at 13:23
  • There's a typo in the Swift 3.0+ solution: you left the 3 and 2 hardcoded in the body :) – Eugenio May 20 '18 at 11:52
  • 4
    Isn't the solution here flawed for the case where the toIndex is greater than the fromIndex as the removeAtIndex will change the Index of the destination toIndex point? – user3621075 Sep 4 '18 at 13:50
41

All great answers! Here's a more complete Swift 5 solution with performance in mind and bonus for benchmark and GIF fans. ✌️

extension Array where Element: Equatable
{
    mutating func move(_ element: Element, to newIndex: Index) {
        if let oldIndex: Int = self.firstIndex(of: element) { self.move(from: oldIndex, to: newIndex) }
    }
}

extension Array
{
    mutating func move(from oldIndex: Index, to newIndex: Index) {
        // Don't work for free and use swap when indices are next to each other - this
        // won't rebuild array and will be super efficient.
        if oldIndex == newIndex { return }
        if abs(newIndex - oldIndex) == 1 { return self.swapAt(oldIndex, newIndex) }
        self.insert(self.remove(at: oldIndex), at: newIndex)
    }
}

GIF

| improve this answer | |
40

edit/update: Swift 3.x

extension RangeReplaceableCollection where Indices: Equatable {
    mutating func rearrange(from: Index, to: Index) {
        precondition(from != to && indices.contains(from) && indices.contains(to), "invalid indices")
        insert(remove(at: from), at: to)
    }
}

var numbers = [1,2,3,4]
numbers.rearrange(from: 1, to: 2)

print(numbers)  // [1, 3, 2, 4]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    nice, for Swift 3: extension Array { mutating func rearrange(from: Int, to: Int) { insert(remove(at: from), at: to) } } var myArray = [1,2,3,4] myArray.rearrange(from: 1, to: 2) print(myArray) – ingconti Apr 7 '17 at 8:51
  • insert(remove...) what if element doesn't exist? – Vyachaslav Gerchicov Oct 5 '17 at 7:57
  • 1
    There is a precondition – Leo Dabus Oct 5 '17 at 10:01
  • 1
    Isn't the solution here flawed for the case where the toIndex is greater than the fromIndex as the removeAtIndex will change the Index of the destination toIndex point? – user3621075 Sep 4 '18 at 13:51
  • 1
    Leo, it seemed to me that there would be a side effect of the Remove operation that would influence how the function works depending on whether you are moving an item forwards or backwards. It does appear however that I am wrong in this. – user3621075 Sep 6 '18 at 8:42
22

nice tip from Leo.

for Swift 3:

extension Array {  
    mutating func rearrange(from: Int, to: Int) {
        insert(remove(at: from), at: to)
    }
}

var myArray = [1,2,3,4]
myArray.rearrange(from: 1, to: 2)   
print(myArray)
| improve this answer | |
16
var arr = ["one", "two", "three", "four", "five"]

// Swap elements at index: 2 and 3
print(arr)
arr.swapAt(2, 3)
print(arr)
| improve this answer | |
10

Swift 4.2

extension Array where Element: Equatable {
    mutating func move(_ item: Element, to newIndex: Index) {
        if let index = index(of: item) {
            move(at: index, to: newIndex)
        }
    }

    mutating func bringToFront(item: Element) {
        move(item, to: 0)
    }

    mutating func sendToBack(item: Element) {
        move(item, to: endIndex-1)
    }
}

extension Array {
    mutating func move(at index: Index, to newIndex: Index) {
        insert(remove(at: index), at: newIndex)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
5

We can use swap method to swap items in an array :

var arr = ["one", "two", "three", "four", "five"]

// Swap elements at index: 2 and 3
print(arr)
swap(&arr[2], &arr[3])
print(arr)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    My question is how to rearrange the item not swap 2 items. – Morty Choi Apr 11 '16 at 7:23
  • both are the same as you want to move items from one index to other and swap is a better way i guess. – Muhammad Yawar Ali Apr 11 '16 at 7:24
  • Um. [1,2,3,4,5] swapping 3 and 5 will have [1,2,5,4,3] but I want is [1,2,4,5,3] which is move item at index 2 into index 4 – Morty Choi Apr 11 '16 at 7:27
  • then its simple just do like : let element = arr.removeAtIndex(2) & arr.append(element) – Muhammad Yawar Ali Apr 11 '16 at 7:30
1

There is no move functionality in swift for arrays. you can take an object at an index by removing it from there and place it in your favourite index by using 'insert'

var swiftarray = [1,2,3,4]
let myobject = swiftarray.removeAtIndex(1) // 2 is the object at 1st index
let myindex = 3
swiftarray.insert(myobject, atIndex: myindex) // if you want to insert the    object to a particular index here it is 3
swiftarray.append(myobject) // if you want to move the object to last index
| improve this answer | |
1

Swift 4 - Solution for moving a group of items from an IndexSet of indices, grouping them and moving them to a destination index. Realised through an extension to RangeReplaceableCollection. Includes a method to remove and return all items in an IndexSet. I wasn't sure how to constrain the extension to a more generalised form than to constrain the element than integer while maintaining the ability to construct IndexSets as my knowledge of Swift Protocols is not that extensive.

extension RangeReplaceableCollection where Self.Indices.Element == Int {

    /**
        Removes the items contained in an `IndexSet` from the collection.
        Items outside of the collection range will be ignored.

        - Parameter indexSet: The set of indices to be removed.
        - Returns: Returns the removed items as an `Array<Self.Element>`.
    */
    @discardableResult
    mutating func removeItems(in indexSet: IndexSet) -> [Self.Element] {

        var returnItems = [Self.Element]()

        for (index, _) in self.enumerated().reversed() {
            if indexSet.contains(index) {
                returnItems.insert(self.remove(at: index), at: startIndex)
            }
        }
        return returnItems
    }


    /**
        Moves a set of items with indices contained in an `IndexSet` to a     
        destination index within the collection.

        - Parameters:
            - indexSet: The `IndexSet` of items to move.
            - destinationIndex: The destination index to which to move the items.
        - Returns: `true` if the operation completes successfully else `false`.

        If any items fall outside of the range of the collection this function 
        will fail with a fatal error.
    */
    @discardableResult
    mutating func moveItems(from indexSet: IndexSet, to destinationIndex: Index) -> Bool {

        guard indexSet.isSubset(of: IndexSet(indices)) else {
            debugPrint("Source indices out of range.")
            return false
            }
        guard (0..<self.count + indexSet.count).contains(destinationIndex) else {
            debugPrint("Destination index out of range.")
            return false
        }

        let itemsToMove = self.removeItems(in: indexSet)

        let modifiedDestinationIndex:Int = {
            return destinationIndex - indexSet.filter { destinationIndex > $0 }.count
        }()

        self.insert(contentsOf: itemsToMove, at: modifiedDestinationIndex)

        return true
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Efficient solution:

extension Array 
{
    mutating func move(from sourceIndex: Int, to destinationIndex: Int)
    {
        guard
            sourceIndex != destinationIndex
            && Swift.min(sourceIndex, destinationIndex) >= 0
            && Swift.max(sourceIndex, destinationIndex) < count
        else {
            return
        }

        let direction = sourceIndex < destinationIndex ? 1 : -1
        var sourceIndex = sourceIndex

        repeat {
            let nextSourceIndex = sourceIndex + direction
            swapAt(sourceIndex, nextSourceIndex)
            sourceIndex = nextSourceIndex
        }
        while sourceIndex != destinationIndex
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Update with Swift 4, Swipe array index

for (index,addres) in self.address.enumerated() {
     if addres.defaultShipping == true{
          let defaultShipping = self.address.remove(at: index)
          self.address.insert(defaultShipping, at: 0)
     }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

@ian has provided good solution but it will be crash when array become out of bound added check for that too

extension Array where Element: Equatable {
    public mutating func move(_ element: Element, to newIndex: Index) {
        if let oldIndex: Int = index(of: element) {
            self.move(from: oldIndex, to: newIndex)
        }
    }

    public mutating func moveToFirst(item: Element) {
        self.move(item, to: 0)
    }

    public mutating func move(from oldIndex: Index, to newIndex: Index) {
        // won't rebuild array and will be super efficient.
        if oldIndex == newIndex { return }
        // Index out of bound handle here
        if newIndex >= self.count { return }
        // Don't work for free and use swap when indices are next to each other - this
        if abs(newIndex - oldIndex) == 1 { return self.swapAt(oldIndex, newIndex) }
        // Remove at old index and insert at new location
        self.insert(self.remove(at: oldIndex), at: newIndex)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Function(not swift but universal.. lookup/remove/insert):

func c_move_to(var array:Array,var from:Int,var to:Int):

    var val = array[from]
    array.remove(from)
    array.insert(to,val)
    return array

How to use:

print("MOVE 0 to 3  [1,2,3,4,5]"  , c_move_to([1,2,3,4,5],0,3))
print("MOVE 1 to 2  [1,2,3,4,5]"  , c_move_to([1,2,3,4,5],1,2)) 

spits out:

MOVE 0 to 3  [1,2,3,4,5][2, 3, 4, 1, 5]
MOVE 1 to 2  [1,2,3,4,5][1, 3, 2, 4, 5]
| improve this answer | |
  • You state universal, not swift. So why post? doesn't answer the OP's question. Much better Swift answers already posted (array.swap(...)) – nine stones Feb 12 at 3:24
-1

Leo Dabus's solution is great however using precondition(from != to && indices.contains(from != to && indices.contains(to), "invalid indexes"), will crash the app if the conditions are not met. I changed it to guard and an if statement - if for some reason the conditions are not met, nothing happens and the app continues. I think we should avoid making extensions that may crash the app. If you wish you could make the rearrange function return a Bool - true if successful and false if failed. The safer solution:

extension Array {
mutating func rearrange(from: Int, to: Int) {
    guard from != to else { return }
    //precondition(from != to && indices.contains(from) && indices.contains(to), "invalid indexes")
    if indices.contains(from) && indices.contains(to) {
        insert(remove(at: from), at: to)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Please expand on your answer. Why is this safer? – O.O.Balance May 31 '18 at 9:49
  • Leo, Thank you for the link, very informative. I admit to not fully understanding the use of preconditions and asserts and the link clarifies some of this for me. For my own use, I needed the rearrange function to not crash the app even if the array did not contain the indices, but just leave the array as is. – Jonathan Hoche Sep 11 '18 at 17:29

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