813

Some elements in my array are empty strings based on what the user has submitted. I need to remove those elements. I have this:

foreach($linksArray as $link)
{
    if($link == '')
    {
        unset($link);
    }
}
print_r($linksArray);

But it doesn't work. $linksArray still has empty elements. I have also tried doing it with the empty() function, but the outcome is the same.

  • 1
    I thought it was worth mentioning that the code above does not work because unset(...) operates on the variable created by the foreach loop, not the original array that obviously stays as it was before the loop. – savedario Feb 17 '17 at 9:42
  • if(!empty($link)) { echo $link; } this works for me – Shiplu Jul 21 '19 at 8:23
  • U are changing a $link that is not refferenced! use foreach($linksArray as $key => $link) unset(linksArray[$key]) – TD_Nijboer Mar 22 at 11:37

27 Answers 27

1604

As you're dealing with an array of strings, you can simply use array_filter(), which conveniently handles all this for you:

print_r(array_filter($linksArray));

Keep in mind that if no callback is supplied, all entries of array equal to FALSE (see converting to boolean) will be removed. So if you need to preserve elements that are i.e. exact string '0', you will need a custom callback:

// PHP 7.4 and later
print_r(array_filter($linksArray, fn($value) => !is_null($value) && $value !== ''));

// PHP 5.3 and later
print_r(array_filter($linksArray, function($value) { return !is_null($value) && $value !== ''; }));

// PHP < 5.3
print_r(array_filter($linksArray, create_function('$value', 'return $value !== "";')));
| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    array_filter should remove the empty elements. And if PHP's definition of empty isn't quite the same as your definition, then you can fill in the callback option with an anonymous function that throws out unwanted elements. Apparently you must have php 5.3 or later to use anonymous call backs. stackoverflow.com/questions/2412299/… – Buttle Butkus May 19 '13 at 22:55
  • 76
    watch out array_filter doesnt reindex array indexes (a problem may occur in using processes array in for statement). So wrap it all with array_values function. – Michal - wereda-net May 29 '14 at 7:36
  • 8
    Answer is incorrect, because it will remove false elements too. (php.net/manual/en/function.array-filter.php) – pliashkou Oct 21 '15 at 6:39
  • 5
    @Deji have you tried printing that array before filtering it? I think setting a the second time just resets the first one. – Cullub Jan 31 '16 at 0:10
  • 5
    @Cranio: which is already covered by another comment. It is not incorrect, but perhaps broader than your requirements. That doesn't mean other people can't find it helpful still; after all, if all you have is strings in your array, this answer will remove only the empty ones. – Martijn Pieters Jul 18 '16 at 10:04
168

You can use array_filter to remove empty elements:

$emptyRemoved = array_filter($linksArray);

If you have (int) 0 in your array, you may use the following:

$emptyRemoved = remove_empty($linksArray);

function remove_empty($array) {
  return array_filter($array, '_remove_empty_internal');
}

function _remove_empty_internal($value) {
  return !empty($value) || $value === 0;
}

EDIT: Maybe your elements are not empty per se but contain one or more spaces... You can use the following before using array_filter

$trimmedArray = array_map('trim', $linksArray);
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    I just added it to the accepted answer by BoltClock, you could simply do array_filter($foo, 'strlen') to avoid the "0" issue and only remove those with zero length. – A.B. Carroll Apr 26 '13 at 18:27
  • 2
    @nezZario: Assuming you only have scalar items in your array yes. Otherwise, you cannot do that. – Andrew Moore Jun 24 '13 at 21:39
  • 2
    Using lambda for php >= 5.3 function remove_empty($array) { return array_filter($array, function($value){return !empty($value) || $value === 0;}); } – viral Aug 27 '15 at 18:33
  • 1
    array_map() did the magic cos I had spaces in those empty arrays! – Prodigy Feb 12 '17 at 13:39
134

The most popular answer on this topic is absolutely INCORRECT.

Consider the following PHP script:

<?php
$arr = array('1', '', '2', '3', '0');
// Incorrect:
print_r(array_filter($arr));
// Correct:
print_r(array_filter($arr, 'strlen'));

Why is this? Because a string containing a single '0' character also evaluates to boolean false, so even though it's not an empty string, it will still get filtered. That would be a bug.

Passing the built-in strlen function as the filtering function will work, because it returns a non-zero integer for a non-empty string, and a zero integer for an empty string. Non-zero integers always evaluate to true when converted to boolean, while zero integers always evaluate to false when converted to boolean.

So, the absolute, definitive, correct answer is:

$arr = array_filter($arr, 'strlen');
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Agreed. This should be the accepted answer, for those whose array contains strings – mwieczorek Sep 7 '16 at 11:06
  • 2
    Upvoted. A better answer than many of the others, however it should be noted that the currently-accepted answer is technically not incorrect since "empty" does, indeed, have special meaning within PHP. (Some values that qualify as "empty": 0, "", null) – rinogo May 4 '17 at 1:45
  • 5
    They are not incorrect, it's all about context. In some cases preserving the value 0 could be important. So please, don't say that everyone is wrong except you – Macr1408 Sep 26 '18 at 20:57
  • 7
    This breaks if the array contains another array: strlen() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given – hpaknia Oct 28 '18 at 7:11
  • You can say that this can also be a good approach (instead of saying others incorrect)to achieve one's desired actions.Basically not all the cases are similar .Although this approach is working for my case. – MR_AMDEV May 1 '19 at 23:15
101
$linksArray = array_filter($linksArray);

"If no callback is supplied, all entries of input equal to FALSE will be removed." -- http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-filter.php

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    I also tried this after Google'ing the problem. Unfortunately, it leaves in the blank elements for me. – Will Sep 6 '10 at 21:16
  • 22
    this will also remove '0' – OIS Sep 6 '10 at 21:29
  • 2
    @Will: are you sure? It removes also empty strings, I successfully tested this. Maybe your input values contain spaces and should be trimmed before. According to the boolean conversion rules the empty string is evaluated to false and therefore removed by array_filter. – acme Mar 12 '12 at 11:26
53
    $myarray = array_filter($myarray, 'strlen');  //removes null values but leaves "0"
    $myarray = array_filter($myarray);            //removes all null values
| improve this answer | |
  • strlen also removes false :( – justnorris Mar 3 '14 at 14:13
  • Only if false is a string. A boolean false has no strring length. – mickmackusa Jun 10 at 7:47
43

You can just do

array_filter($array)

array_filter: "If no callback is supplied, all entries of input equal to FALSE will be removed." This means that elements with values NULL, 0, '0', '', FALSE, array() will be removed too.

The other option is doing

array_diff($array, array(''))

which will remove elements with values NULL, '' and FALSE.

Hope this helps :)

UPDATE

Here is an example.

$a = array(0, '0', NULL, FALSE, '', array());

var_dump(array_filter($a));
// array()

var_dump(array_diff($a, array(0))) // 0 / '0'
// array(NULL, FALSE, '', array());

var_dump(array_diff($a, array(NULL))) // NULL / FALSE / ''
// array(0, '0', array())

To sum up:

  • 0 or '0' will remove 0 and '0'
  • NULL, FALSE or '' will remove NULL, FALSE and ''
| improve this answer | |
36
foreach($linksArray as $key => $link) 
{ 
    if($link === '') 
    { 
        unset($linksArray[$key]); 
    } 
} 
print_r($linksArray); 
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    A concise, readable and safe solution that doesn't remove false and 0. Considering this was posted the same minute as the accepted answer (that is unsafe and incorrect), I can only assume your 8 upvotes compared to the accepted answer's 649 is down to the latter being a one-line solution. – rybo111 Feb 10 '16 at 16:27
  • @rybo111 - possibly, though using that logic in a callback to array_filter() would be a cleaner approach than a foreach() loop – Mark Baker Feb 10 '16 at 16:48
  • Perhaps quicker, but your solution is the most readable, which is important. For those using your solution requiring trim(), I would recommend if(is_string($link) && trim($link) === '') – rybo111 Feb 10 '16 at 17:16
34

Another one liner to remove empty ("" empty string) elements from your array.

$array = array_filter($array, function($a) {return $a !== "";});

Note: This code deliberately keeps null, 0 and false elements.


Or maybe you want to trim your array elements first:

$array = array_filter($array, function($a) {
    return trim($a) !== "";
});

Note: This code also removes null and false elements.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Exactly what I neeeded, and this is also compatible with older PHPs, thanks! ;-) – Stano Jul 11 '13 at 11:34
  • 1
    @JohnK Wrong. To do this exactly like the user whants to the callback is needed, unless you want to remove alzo zeroes and other falsey values. – Cranio Dec 10 '15 at 15:22
  • Oh... this is absolutely lovely. Should be the accepted one. – Henrik Petterson Nov 25 '16 at 14:01
22

In short:

This is my suggested code:

$myarray =  array_values(array_filter(array_map('trim', $myarray), 'strlen'));

Explanation:

I thinks use array_filter is good, but not enough, because values be like space and \n,... keep in the array and this is usually bad.

So I suggest you use mixture ‍‍array_filter and array_map.

array_map is for trimming, array_filter is for remove empty values, strlen is for keep 0 value, and array_values is for re indexing if you needed.

Samples:

$myarray = array("\r", "\n", "\r\n", "", " ", "0", "a");

// "\r", "\n", "\r\n", " ", "a"
$new1 = array_filter($myarray);

// "a"
$new2 = array_filter(array_map('trim', $myarray));

// "0", "a"
$new3 = array_filter(array_map('trim', $myarray), 'strlen');

// "0", "a" (reindex)
$new4 = array_values(array_filter(array_map('trim', $myarray), 'strlen'));

var_dump($new1, $new2, $new3, $new4);

Results:

array(5) {
  [0]=>
" string(1) "
  [1]=>
  string(1) "
"
  [2]=>
  string(2) "
"
  [4]=>
  string(1) " "
  [6]=>
  string(1) "a"
}
array(1) {
  [6]=>
  string(1) "a"
}
array(2) {
  [5]=>
  string(1) "0"
  [6]=>
  string(1) "a"
}
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  string(1) "0"
  [1]=>
  string(1) "a"
}

Online Test:

http://phpio.net/s/5yg0

| improve this answer | |
13

If you are working with a numerical array and need to re-index the array after removing empty elements, use the array_values function:

array_values(array_filter($array));

Also see: PHP reindex array?

| improve this answer | |
12

The most voted answer is wrong or at least not completely true as the OP is talking about blank strings only. Here's a thorough explanation:

What does empty mean?

First of all, we must agree on what empty means. Do you mean to filter out:

  1. the empty strings only ("")?
  2. the strictly false values? ($element === false)
  3. the falsey values? (i.e. 0, 0.0, "", "0", NULL, array()...)
  4. the equivalent of PHP's empty() function?

How do you filter out the values

To filter out empty strings only:

$filtered = array_diff($originalArray, array(""));

To only filter out strictly false values, you must use a callback function:

$filtered = array_diff($originalArray, 'myCallback');
function myCallback($var) {
    return $var === false;
}

The callback is also useful for any combination in which you want to filter out the "falsey" values, except some. (For example, filter every null and false, etc, leaving only 0):

$filtered = array_filter($originalArray, 'myCallback');
function myCallback($var) {
    return ($var === 0 || $var === '0');
}

Third and fourth case are (for our purposes at last) equivalent, and for that all you have to use is the default:

$filtered = array_filter($originalArray);
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    If you want to take out null and false, but leave 0, you can also use php's built-in strlen function as your callback. – Cullub Jan 31 '16 at 0:16
10
$a = array(1, '', '', '', 2, '', 3, 4);
$b = array_values(array_filter($a));

print_r($b)
| improve this answer | |
  • array_values to make index sequential. Thanks :) – Pankaj Wanjari Jul 25 at 10:37
10

For multidimensional array

$data = array_map('array_filter', $data);
$data = array_filter($data);
| improve this answer | |
10

I had to do this in order to keep an array value of (string) 0

$url = array_filter($data, function ($value) {
  return (!empty($value) || $value === 0 || $value==='0');
});
| improve this answer | |
9
$out_array = array_filter($input_array, function($item) 
{ 
    return !empty($item['key_of_array_to_check_whether_it_is_empty']); 
}
);
| improve this answer | |
9
function trim_array($Array)
{
    foreach ($Array as $value) {
        if(trim($value) === '') {
            $index = array_search($value, $Array);
            unset($Array[$index]);
        }
    }
    return $Array;
}
| improve this answer | |
7

I use the following script to remove empty elements from an array

for ($i=0; $i<$count($Array); $i++)
  {
    if (empty($Array[$i])) unset($Array[$i]);
  }
| improve this answer | |
7

Just want to contribute an alternative to loops...also addressing gaps in keys...

In my case I wanted to keep sequential array keys when the operation was complete (not just odd numbers, which is what I was staring at. Setting up code to look just for odd keys seemed fragile to me and not future-friendly.)

I was looking for something more like this: http://gotofritz.net/blog/howto/removing-empty-array-elements-php/

The combination of array_filter and array_slice does the trick.

$example = array_filter($example); $example = array_slice($example,0);

No idea on efficiencies or benchmarks but it works.

| improve this answer | |
  • I think array_values would have the same result as array_slice. That seems more intuitive in terms of reading the code later and understanding what it is doing. – arlomedia Mar 11 '15 at 17:15
6
$my = ("0"=>" ","1"=>"5","2"=>"6","3"=>" ");   

foreach ($my as $key => $value) {
    if (is_null($value)) unset($my[$key]);
}

foreach ($my as $key => $value) {
    echo   $key . ':' . $value . '<br>';
} 

output

1:5

2:6

| improve this answer | |
5
foreach($arr as $key => $val){
   if (empty($val)) unset($arr[$key];
}
| improve this answer | |
  • simple, direct! – Richter Jan 23 '19 at 3:29
5

Just one line : Update (thanks to @suther):

$array_without_empty_values = array_filter($array);
| improve this answer | |
  • don't need your second parameter: $clean_array = array_filter($dirty_array); – suther Feb 18 '14 at 10:43
4

use array_filter function to remove empty values:

$linksArray = array_filter($linksArray);
print_r($linksArray);
| improve this answer | |
  • He wants to remove blank strings, which is not equivalent to empty values. – Cranio Dec 10 '15 at 15:23
4

Remove empty array elements

function removeEmptyElements(&$element)
{
    if (is_array($element)) {
        if ($key = key($element)) {
            $element[$key] = array_filter($element);
        }

        if (count($element) != count($element, COUNT_RECURSIVE)) {
            $element = array_filter(current($element), __FUNCTION__);
        }

        return $element;
    } else {
        return empty($element) ? false : $element;
    }
}

$data = array(
    'horarios' => array(),
    'grupos' => array(
        '1A' => array(
            'Juan' => array(
                'calificaciones' => array(
                    'Matematicas' => 8,
                    'Español' => 5,
                    'Ingles' => 9,
                ),
                'asistencias' => array(
                    'enero' => 20,
                    'febrero' => 10,
                    'marzo' => '',
                )
            ),
            'Damian' => array(
                'calificaciones' => array(
                    'Matematicas' => 10,
                    'Español' => '',
                    'Ingles' => 9,
                ),
                'asistencias' => array(
                    'enero' => 20,
                    'febrero' => '',
                    'marzo' => 5,
                )
            ),
        ),
        '1B' => array(
            'Mariana' => array(
                'calificaciones' => array(
                    'Matematicas' => null,
                    'Español' => 7,
                    'Ingles' => 9,
                ),
                'asistencias' => array(
                    'enero' => null,
                    'febrero' => 5,
                    'marzo' => 5,
                )
            ),
        ),
    )
);

$data = array_filter($data, 'removeEmptyElements');
var_dump($data);

¡it works!

| improve this answer | |
3

As per your method, you can just catch those elements in an another array and use that one like follows,

foreach($linksArray as $link){
   if(!empty($link)){
      $new_arr[] = $link
   }
}

print_r($new_arr);
| improve this answer | |
3

I think array_walk is much more suitable here

$linksArray = array('name', '        ', '  342', '0', 0.0, null, '', false);

array_walk($linksArray, function(&$v, $k) use (&$linksArray){
    $v = trim($v);
    if ($v == '')
        unset($linksArray[$k]);
});
print_r($linksArray);

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => name
    [2] => 342
    [3] => 0
    [4] => 0
)
  • We made sure that empty values are removed even if the user adds more than one space

  • We also trimmed empty spaces from the valid values

  • Finally, only (null), (Boolean False) and ('') will be considered empty strings

As for False it's ok to remove it, because AFAIK the user can't submit boolean values.

| improve this answer | |
1

try this ** **Example

$or = array(
        'PersonalInformation.first_name' => $this->request->data['User']['first_name'],
        'PersonalInformation.last_name' => $this->request->data['User']['last_name'],
        'PersonalInformation.primary_phone' => $this->request->data['User']['primary_phone'],
        'PersonalInformation.dob' => $this->request->data['User']['dob'],
        'User.email' => $this->request->data['User']['email'],
    );



 $or = array_filter($or);

    $condition = array(
        'User.role' => array('U', 'P'),
        'User.user_status' => array('active', 'lead', 'inactive'),
        'OR' => $or
    );
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    what is this? there are tons of other very relevant answers. What are you adding here? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Feb 25 '16 at 6:25
  • check out the url what was the question here!!/*remove empty array element*/ – Ashish pathak Mar 4 '16 at 10:55
0

With these types of things, it's much better to be explicit about what you want and do not want.

It will help the next guy to not get caught by surprise at the behaviour of array_filter() without a callback. For example, I ended up on this question because I forgot if array_filter() removes NULL or not. I wasted time when I could have just used the solution below and had my answer.

Also, the logic is language angnostic in the sense that the code can be copied into another language without having to under stand the behaviour of a php function like array_filter when no callback is passed.

In my solution, it is clear at glance as to what is happening. Remove a conditional to keep something or add a new condition to filter additional values.

Disregard the actual use of array_filter() since I am just passing it a custom callback - you could go ahead and extract that out to its own function if you wanted. I am just using it as sugar for a foreach loop.

<?php

$xs = [0, 1, 2, 3, "0", "", false, null];

$xs = array_filter($xs, function($x) {
    if ($x === null) { return false; }
    if ($x === false) { return false; }
    if ($x === "") { return false; }
    if ($x === "0") { return false; }
    return true;
});

$xs = array_values($xs); // reindex array   

echo "<pre>";
var_export($xs);

Another benefit of this approach is that you can break apart the filtering predicates into an abstract function that filters a single value per array and build up to a composable solution.

See this example and the inline comments for the output.

<?php

/**
 * @param string $valueToFilter
 *
 * @return \Closure A function that expects a 1d array and returns an array
 *                  filtered of values matching $valueToFilter.
 */
function filterValue($valueToFilter)
{
    return function($xs) use ($valueToFilter) {
        return array_filter($xs, function($x) use ($valueToFilter) {
            return $x !== $valueToFilter;
        });
    };
}

// partially applied functions that each expect a 1d array of values
$filterNull = filterValue(null);
$filterFalse = filterValue(false);
$filterZeroString = filterValue("0");
$filterEmptyString = filterValue("");

$xs = [0, 1, 2, 3, null, false, "0", ""];

$xs = $filterNull($xs);        //=> [0, 1, 2, 3, false, "0", ""]
$xs = $filterFalse($xs);       //=> [0, 1, 2, 3, "0", ""]
$xs = $filterZeroString($xs);  //=> [0, 1, 2, 3, ""]
$xs = $filterEmptyString($xs); //=> [0, 1, 2, 3]

echo "<pre>";
var_export($xs); //=> [0, 1, 2, 3]

Now you can dynamically create a function called filterer() using pipe() that will apply these partially applied functions for you.

<?php

/**
 * Supply between 1..n functions each with an arity of 1 (that is, accepts
 * one and only one argument). Versions prior to php 5.6 do not have the
 * variadic operator `...` and as such require the use of `func_get_args()` to
 * obtain the comma-delimited list of expressions provided via the argument
 * list on function call.
 *
 * Example - Call the function `pipe()` like:
 *
 *   pipe ($addOne, $multiplyByTwo);
 *
 * @return closure
 */
function pipe()
{
    $functions = func_get_args(); // an array of callable functions [$addOne, $multiplyByTwo]
    return function ($initialAccumulator) use ($functions) { // return a function with an arity of 1
        return array_reduce( // chain the supplied `$arg` value through each function in the list of functions
            $functions, // an array of functions to reduce over the supplied `$arg` value
            function ($accumulator, $currFn) { // the reducer (a reducing function)
                return $currFn($accumulator);
            },
            $initialAccumulator
        );
    };
}

/**
 * @param string $valueToFilter
 *
 * @return \Closure A function that expects a 1d array and returns an array
 *                  filtered of values matching $valueToFilter.
 */
function filterValue($valueToFilter)
{
    return function($xs) use ($valueToFilter) {
        return array_filter($xs, function($x) use ($valueToFilter) {
            return $x !== $valueToFilter;
        });
    };
}

$filterer = pipe(
    filterValue(null),
    filterValue(false),
    filterValue("0"),
    filterValue("")
);

$xs = [0, 1, 2, 3, null, false, "0", ""];
$xs = $filterer($xs);

echo "<pre>";
var_export($xs); //=> [0, 1, 2, 3]
| improve this answer | |

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