1

I want to know if there's a more Pythonic way of doing the following, perhaps using dictionary comprehensions:

A = some list
D = {}
for i,v in enumerate(A):
    if v in D:
        D[v].append(i)
    else:
        D[v] = [i]
4

Using defaultdict:

from collections import defaultdict
D = defaultdict(list)
[D[v].append(i) for i, v in enumerate(A)]

Using setdefault:

D = {}
[D.setdefault(v, []).append(i) for i, v in enumerate(A)]

I can't figure any mean to use a dictionnary comprehension without sorting the data:

from itertools import groupby
from operator import itemgetter
{v: ids for v, ids in groupby(enumerate(sorted(A)), itemgetter(1))}

Performances:

from collections import defaultdict
from itertools import groupby
from operator import itemgetter
from random import randint

A = tuple(randint(0, 100) for _ in range(1000))

def one():
    D = defaultdict(list)
    [D[v].append(i) for i, v in enumerate(A)]

def two():
    D = {}
    [D.setdefault(v, []).append(i) for i, v in enumerate(A)]

def three():
    {v: ids for v, ids in groupby(enumerate(sorted(A)), itemgetter(1))}


from timeit import timeit

for func in (one, two, three):
    print(func.__name__ + ':', timeit(func, number=1000))

Results (as always, the simplest win):

one: 0.25547646999984863
two: 0.3754340969971963
three: 0.5032370890003222
  • 1
    Is it really Pythonic to use list-comprehensions merely as a means of doing work? I'll admit, I've run into that issue before, and considered list-comps as a way to get it done, but it feels hacky. Other than that, though, I agree with defaultdict as the clearest answer. – dwanderson Apr 11 '16 at 13:20
  • The other way is using map, but list comprehension is much more readable, and generally preferred. – aluriak Apr 11 '16 at 13:23
1

You can do the following

d = collections.defaultdict(list)
for i,v in enumerate(A):
    d[v].append(i)

You can see that the values of the resulting dictionary are lists, the elements of which are to be produced while traversing. If you insist on doing a dict comp, you have to first find all the (value, [indices]), then do a dict comp on [(k,[v])], which just means extra acrobatics without any benefit.

  • Actually, arrived at this solution from looking at the selected answer. – lorenzocastillo Apr 11 '16 at 13:37
  • @user2804747 Great. If you are dealing with data transformations using mainly dictionaries collections module is worth a read. – C Panda Apr 11 '16 at 13:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.