14

I have an object similar to

var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };

I am trying to filter based on value using this

$.filter(obj,function(i, value){
  return value>3;
});

However this is returning empty.

Expected output {'Sand': 4 }

Is there a way to filter by value, when the indexes of the objects cannot be consistently addressed and may vary.

  • 2
    What is your desired output? – Zakaria Acharki Apr 11 '16 at 14:07
  • @ZakariaAcharki I have updated it with expected output – Joel Apr 11 '16 at 14:11
  • 1
    You shouldn't use jQuery to do that. It's a easy operation do with native JavaScript and it will be faster too. Take a look on the answers bellow. – Ricardo França Apr 11 '16 at 14:20
6

Try something like this..

function filterObjectProperties(obj, filtercb){
    var ret = {};
    for(var p in obj)
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(p))
            if(filtercb(obj[p]))
                ret[p] = obj[p];
    return ret;
}

var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };

var newObj = filterObjectProperties(obj, function(val){
    return val > 3;
});

https://jsfiddle.net/dht2L55L/

  • Would .keys() be more efficient because a for-in loop enumerates properties in the prototype chain as well? I did not test this supposition. – Mark Schultheiss Apr 11 '16 at 18:10
  • you're right, it loops prototype properties as well, that's why I used hasOwnProperty(), which filters out the prototype properties. – I wrestled a bear once. Apr 11 '16 at 18:13
  • you could use keys() as well, but it's less portable. you would need to include a polyfill for old browsers. – I wrestled a bear once. Apr 11 '16 at 18:15
  • OK, thanks, here is a link to a polyfill for those needing it for keys developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Note I did up vote this as a pretty generic solution. – Mark Schultheiss Apr 11 '16 at 18:16
2

This can be done without $.filter:

var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };
result = {};
for (var k in obj) {
    if (obj[k] > 3) {
        result[k] = obj[k];
    }
}
console.log(result);
  • Would .keys() be more efficient because a for-in loop enumerates properties in the prototype chain as well? I did not test this supposition. – Mark Schultheiss Apr 11 '16 at 18:08
1

You could you JQuery.each(). To use JQuery.filter and JQuery.grep, I think your object should be formed different.

$(function(){

var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };

var result = null;

$.each(obj, function(key, value) {
   if(value > 3){
   result = key;
   }
}); 

console.log(result);

});
1

There is no native filter to the Object object, but how about this:

var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };
newObject = {}
Object.keys(obj).map(function(value, index) {
    if (obj[value]>3){
       newObject[value] = obj [value]
    }
});
snippet.log(newObject);
// => {'Sand': 4 }
<script src="http://tjcrowder.github.io/simple-snippets-console/snippet.js"></script>

1

Should be as simple as

var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };

var result = Object.keys(obj)
    .filter(function(e) { return obj[e] > 3 })
    .reduce(function(object, property) { 
         return (object[property] = obj[property], object);
     }, {})

without any library

0
var obj = { 'Earth': 1, 'Sky': 2, 'Tree': 3, 'Sand': 4 };

function filterObj(obj, valueThreshold) {
  var keys = Object.keys(obj);
  var result = {};
  keys.forEach(function(key) {
    var value = obj[key];
    if (value > valueThreshold) {
      result[key] = value;
    }
  })
  return result;
}

console.log('obj: ' + JSON.stringify(obj));
var filteredObj = filterObj(obj, 3);
console.log('filterdObj: ' + JSON.stringify(filteredObj));

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