70

I have a collection of 1000 input message to process. I'm looping the input collection and starting the new task for each message to get processed.

//Assume this messages collection contains 1000 items
var messages = new List<string>();

foreach (var msg in messages)
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        Process(msg);
    });
 }

Can we guess how many maximum messages simultaneously get processed at the time (assuming normal Quad core processor), or can we limit the maximum number of messages to be processed at the time?

How to ensure this message get processed in the same sequence/order of the collection?

4

11 Answers 11

83

You could use Parallel.Foreach and rely on MaxDegreeOfParallelism instead.

Parallel.ForEach(messages, new ParallelOptions {MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10},
msg =>
{
     // logic
     Process(msg);
});
8
  • 5
    This is exactly the kind of processing that Parallel.ForEach was made for. Apr 12, 2016 at 6:15
  • And since the Task Parallel Library is build on the ThreadPool we can assume it will only run as many tasks as the system has cores if we do not specify it explicitly.
    – Toxantron
    Apr 12, 2016 at 6:19
  • Would this ensure that the messages would be processed in the same order as they occur in the List?
    – bit
    Apr 12, 2016 at 6:19
  • 1
    I don't think bit was talking about completion but rather about processing order. In my programs, it seems that when using Parallel.Foreach, the list is cut in n sets (MaxDegreeOfParallelism). All sets are processed in parallel and within each set, the order is enforced. Aug 31, 2017 at 8:29
  • 16
    I just wanted to caution everyone from using Parallel.ForEach for async I/O bound tasks. It was not really created for async operations. It will just start X thread-pool threads and block them during I/O waits. Use SemaphoreSlim instead May 18, 2020 at 19:11
70

SemaphoreSlim is a very good solution in this case and I higly recommend OP to try this, but @Manoj's answer has flaw as mentioned in comments.semaphore should be waited before spawning the task like this.

Updated Answer: As @Vasyl pointed out Semaphore may be disposed before completion of tasks and will raise exception when Release() method is called so before exiting the using block must wait for the completion of all created Tasks.

int maxConcurrency=10;
var messages = new List<string>();
using(SemaphoreSlim concurrencySemaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(maxConcurrency))
{
    List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
    foreach(var msg in messages)
    {
        concurrencySemaphore.Wait();

        var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            try
            {
                 Process(msg);
            }
            finally
            {
                concurrencySemaphore.Release();
            }
        });

        tasks.Add(t);
    }

    Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
}

Answer to Comments for those who want to see how semaphore can be disposed without Task.WaitAll Run below code in console app and this exception will be raised.

System.ObjectDisposedException: 'The semaphore has been disposed.'

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int maxConcurrency = 5;
    List<string> messages =  Enumerable.Range(1, 15).Select(e => e.ToString()).ToList();

    using (SemaphoreSlim concurrencySemaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(maxConcurrency))
    {
        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
        foreach (var msg in messages)
        {
            concurrencySemaphore.Wait();

            var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                try
                {
                    Process(msg);
                }
                finally
                {
                    concurrencySemaphore.Release();
                }
            });

            tasks.Add(t);
        }

       // Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
    }
    Console.WriteLine("Exited using block");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

private static void Process(string msg)
{            
    Thread.Sleep(2000);
    Console.WriteLine(msg);
}
7
  • 2
    What will be if Process method will run for a long time? concurrencySemaphore.Release() may be called when concurrencySemaphore is disposed already. And as a result - ObjectDisposedException. Jul 18, 2017 at 23:23
  • @VasylZvarydchuk you are right.I have updated the answer
    – ClearLogic
    Jul 19, 2017 at 7:00
  • 2
    How can it be that semaphore is disposed before all tasks have finished?
    – user2882307
    Jun 18, 2018 at 16:13
  • @VasylZvarydchuk - how will the semaphore be disposed before released, even if Process runs long time?
    – grunt
    Aug 13, 2018 at 13:45
  • It wont be disposed in the current Answer.comment out Task.WaitAll and see yourself
    – ClearLogic
    Sep 9, 2018 at 3:13
11

I think it would be better to use Parallel LINQ

  Parallel.ForEach(messages ,
     new ParallelOptions{MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 4},
            x => Process(x);
        );

where x is the MaxDegreeOfParallelism

8

With .NET 5.0 and Core 3.0 channels were introduced.
The main benefit of this producer/consumer concurrency pattern is that you can also limit the input data processing to reduce resource impact.
This is especially helpful when processing millions of data records.
Instead of reading the whole dataset at once into memory, you can now consecutively query only chunks of the data and wait for the workers to process it before querying more.

Code sample with a queue capacity of 50 messages and a max of logical processors as consumer threads:

/// <exception cref="System.AggregateException">Thrown on Consumer Task exceptions.</exception>
public static async Task ProcessMessages(
    List<string> messages,
    int producerCapacity = 50, 
    int consumerTaskLimit = 0)
{
    if (consumerTaskLimit == 0)
        consumerTaskLimit = Environment.ProcessorCount;
    // by default only uses one processor group
    // https://stackoverflow.com/questions/27965962/c-sharp-environment-processorcount-does-not-always-return-the-full-number-of-log

    var tokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
    CancellationToken ct = tokenSource.Token;

    var channel = Channel.CreateBounded<string>(producerCapacity);

    _ = Task.Run(async () =>
    {
        try
        {
            foreach (var msg in messages)
            {
                await channel.Writer.WriteAsync(msg, ct);
                ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                // blocking when channel is full
                // waiting for the consumer tasks to pop messages from the queue
            }
        }
        catch (OperationCanceledException) { }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Exception while processing Messages\n" + ex);
            tokenSource.Cancel();
        }
        finally
        {
            channel.Writer.Complete();
            // signaling the end of queue so that 
            // WaitToReadAsync will return false to stop the consumer tasks
        }
    });

    var consumerTasks = Enumerable
    .Range(1, consumerTaskLimit)
    .Select(_ => Task.Run(async () =>
    {
        try
        {
            while (await channel.Reader.WaitToReadAsync(ct))
            {
                ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                while (channel.Reader.TryRead(out var message))
                {
                    await Task.Delay(500);
                    Console.WriteLine(message);
                }
            }
        }
        catch (OperationCanceledException) { }
        catch
        {
            tokenSource.Cancel();
            throw;
        }
    }))
    .ToArray();

    Task waitForConsumers = Task.WhenAll(consumerTasks);
    try { await waitForConsumers; }
    catch
    {
        if (waitForConsumers.IsFaulted && waitForConsumers.Exception is not null)
        {
            foreach (var e in waitForConsumers.Exception.Flatten().InnerExceptions)
                Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());

            throw waitForConsumers.Exception.Flatten();
        }
        else throw;
    }
}

As pointed out by Theodor Zoulias: On multiple consumer exceptions, the remaining tasks will continue to run and have to take the load of the killed tasks. To avoid this, I implemented a CancellationToken to stop all the remaining tasks and handle the exceptions combined in the AggregateException of waitForConsumers.Exception.

Side note:
The Task Parallel Library (TPL) might be good at automatically limiting the tasks based on your local resources. But when you are processing data remotely via RPC, it's necessary to manually limit your RPC calls to avoid filling the network/processing stack!

9
  • 1
    This is an attempt to reinvent the ActionBlock<T>. It looks nice, but it has a problem. In case a consumer fails, the rest of the consumers will keep working, and the processMessages will continue running with a reduced degree of parallelism. If all consumers except one fail, the last standing consumer will slowly process all remaining messages alone, until the exceptions are finally surfaced. Sep 14, 2021 at 15:30
  • Thanks for pointing that out! I added a try catch block and a comment
    – 5andr0
    Sep 14, 2021 at 20:24
  • 1
    I think that you've solved it. A CancellationToken is exactly what's needed in this case IMHO. Sep 14, 2021 at 22:30
  • 2
    Yeap, now it's better. 😃 At this point you've probably realized that implementing this kind of functionality using Channels and Tasks is both challenging and laborious. And actually doing it doesn't make much sense, except from being a learning experience, when this functionality is already available natively in .NET 5, in the form of the ActionBlock<T> class (not to mention the TransformBlock<TInput,TOutput> and the other powerful blocks of the TPL Dataflow library). You can see an ActionBlock<T> in action here. Sep 15, 2021 at 18:39
  • 2
    Two years later, and I should mention that I am no longer so enthusiastic with the TPL Dataflow library (ActionBlock<T>). The components of this library have the annoying by design behavior of suppressing any OperationCanceledExceptions that might be thrown by the action, resulting in erroneously reporting successful Completion in this case. Oct 11, 2023 at 7:16
4

If your Process method is async you can't use Task.Factory.StartNew as it doesn't play well with an async delegate. Also there are some other nuances when using it (see this for example).

The proper way to do it in this case is to use Task.Run. Here's @ClearLogic answer modified for an async Process method.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int maxConcurrency = 5;
    List<string> messages =  Enumerable.Range(1, 15).Select(e => e.ToString()).ToList();

    using (SemaphoreSlim concurrencySemaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(maxConcurrency))
    {
        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
        foreach (var msg in messages)
        {
            concurrencySemaphore.Wait();

            var t = Task.Run(async () =>
            {
                try
                {
                    await Process(msg);
                }
                finally
                {
                    concurrencySemaphore.Release();
                }
            });

            tasks.Add(t);
        }

       Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
    }
    Console.WriteLine("Exited using block");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

private static async Task Process(string msg)
{            
    await Task.Delay(2000);
    Console.WriteLine(msg);
}
4
  • This solution blocks needlessly the calling thread (.Wait(), .WaitAll()), so I would consider it to be suboptimal. Sep 17, 2020 at 12:24
  • @TheodorZoulias The accepted answer uses the same approach. This is just a slight modification when the Process method is async. If you don't want to block the calling thread, then simply make your calling thread (in this case the Main) async and replace Task.WaitAll with await Task.WhenAll.This is a simplified case where the calling thread is static void main. But if it were a web request with async processing, this would work just fine without blocking anything.
    – empz
    Sep 17, 2020 at 16:41
  • Fair enough. I just downvoted the accepted answer too. I don't like blocking solutions when an asynchronous one is available. 😃 Sep 17, 2020 at 22:26
  • 1
    Excellent solution. I would suggest making the change you mentioned above: changing Task.WaitAll() to await Task.WhenAll(). Could be helpful to change the Main function to be an async function to show that this whole approach could be its own awaitable function.
    – Dave
    Jan 7, 2022 at 17:23
0

You can create your own TaskScheduler and override QueueTask there.

protected virtual void QueueTask(Task task)

Then you can do anything you like.

One example here:

Limited concurrency level task scheduler (with task priority) handling wrapped tasks

0

You can simply set the max concurrency degree like this way:

int maxConcurrency=10;
var messages = new List<1000>();
using(SemaphoreSlim concurrencySemaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(maxConcurrency))
{
    foreach(var msg in messages)
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            concurrencySemaphore.Wait();
            try
            {
                 Process(msg);
            }
            finally
            {
                concurrencySemaphore.Release();
            }
        });
    }
}
1
  • 6
    This unnecessarily blocks threads, if the thread pool has more threads than your max concurrency.
    – yaakov
    Apr 12, 2016 at 7:20
0

If you need in-order queuing (processing might finish in any order), there is no need for a semaphore. Old fashioned if statements work fine:

        const int maxConcurrency = 5;
        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
        foreach (var arg in args)
        {
            var t = Task.Run(() => { Process(arg); } );

            tasks.Add(t);

            if(tasks.Count >= maxConcurrency)
                Task.WaitAny(tasks.ToArray());
        }

        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
2
  • Is it supposed to wait in the loop and only hit the last WaitAll when close to the end? Because in my experience, it just screams through the loop en hit the WaitAll almost instantly
    – Pierre
    Apr 6, 2018 at 6:09
  • 1
    yeah, that's because completed tasks aren't removed from the tasks list, so the next time WaitAny gets hit, it finds the first complete task and moves on.
    – daf
    Dec 11, 2020 at 6:38
0

I ran into a similar problem where I wanted to produce 5000 results while calling apis, etc. So, I ran some speed tests.

Parallel.ForEach(products.Select(x => x.KeyValue).Distinct().Take(100), id =>
{
    new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 100 };
    GetProductMetaData(productsMetaData, client, id).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
});

produced 100 results in 30 seconds.

Parallel.ForEach(products.Select(x => x.KeyValue).Distinct().Take(100), id =>
{
    new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 100 };
    GetProductMetaData(productsMetaData, client, id);
});

Moving the GetAwaiter().GetResult() to the individual async api calls inside GetProductMetaData resulted in 14.09 seconds to produce 100 results.

foreach (var id in ids.Take(100))
{
    GetProductMetaData(productsMetaData, client, id);
}

Complete non-async programming with the GetAwaiter().GetResult() in api calls resulted in 13.417 seconds.

var tasks = new List<Task>();
while (y < ids.Count())
{
    foreach (var id in ids.Skip(y).Take(100))
    {
        tasks.Add(GetProductMetaData(productsMetaData, client, id));
    }

    y += 100;
    Task.WhenAll(tasks).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    Console.WriteLine($"Finished {y}, {sw.Elapsed}");
}

Forming a task list and working through 100 at a time resulted in a speed of 7.36 seconds.

            using (SemaphoreSlim cons = new SemaphoreSlim(10))
            {
                var tasks = new List<Task>();
                foreach (var id in ids.Take(100))
                {
                    cons.Wait();
                    var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            GetProductMetaData(productsMetaData, client, id);
                        }
                        finally
                        {
                            cons.Release();
                        }
                    });

                    tasks.Add(t);
                }

                Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
            }

Using SemaphoreSlim resulted in 13.369 seconds, but also took a moment to boot to start using it.

var throttler = new SemaphoreSlim(initialCount: take);
foreach (var id in ids)
{
    throttler.WaitAsync().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    tasks.Add(Task.Run(async () =>
    {
        try
        {
            skip += 1;
            await GetProductMetaData(productsMetaData, client, id);

            if (skip % 100 == 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"started {skip}/{count}, {sw.Elapsed}");
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            throttler.Release();
        }
    }));
}

Using Semaphore Slim with a throttler for my async task took 6.12 seconds.

The answer for me in this specific project was use a throttler with Semaphore Slim. Although the while foreach tasklist did sometimes beat the throttler, 4/6 times the throttler won for 1000 records.

I realize I'm not using the OPs code, but I think this is important and adds to this discussion because how is sometimes not the only question that should be asked, and the answer is sometimes "It depends on what you are trying to do."

Now to answer the specific questions:

  1. How to limit the maximum number of parallel tasks in c#: I showed how to limit the number of tasks that are completed at a time.
  2. Can we guess how many maximum messages simultaneously get processed at the time (assuming normal Quad core processor), or can we limit the maximum number of messages to be processed at the time? I cannot guess how many will be processed at a time unless I set an upper limit but I can set an upper limit. Obviously different computers function at different speeds due to CPU, RAM etc. and how many threads and cores the program itself has access to as well as other programs running in tandem on the same computer.
  3. How to ensure this message get processed in the same sequence/order of the Collection? If you want to process everything in a specific order, it is synchronous programming. The point of being able to run things asynchronously is ensuring that they can do everything without an order. As you can see from my code, the time difference is minimal in 100 records unless you use async code. In the event that you need an order to what you are doing, use asynchronous programming up until that point, then await and do things synchronously from there. For example, task1a.start, task2a.start, then later task1a.await, task2a.await... then later task1b.start task1b.await and task2b.start task 2b.await.
4
  • 1
    Hi Patrick. What is the new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 100 }; doing inside the body of the Parallel.ForEach? What is the signature of the GetProductMetaData method that you are using as an example? If this method is asynchronous, then how is it relevant with a question related with parallel synchronous work? For limiting the concurrency (not parallelism) of asynchronous operations, there are other more relevant questions, like this or this. Sep 14, 2021 at 19:37
  • stackoverflow.com/users/11178549/theodor-zoulias, thank you for answering why I've been downvoted, I will likely remove my answer, even though it is crazy useful, I shouldn't have tried to give people advice here. I was specifically looking for ways to limit how many async threads I would run at a time. The method I used was originally synchronous and now is asynchronous. but I tested it sync as well. MaxDegreeOfParallelism can be inside the ForEach loop. I tested each of the methods recommended here, and the task list was by far the fastest... although it was not synchronous. Sep 14, 2021 at 19:51
  • stackoverflow.com/users/11178549/theodor-zoulias obviously you are correct on this. Despite all of my lack of expertise and capacity to speak with the correct terminology, I still did all of the work of speed testing these things and approached with a different intelligent answer. As you said, the same thread is doing all the work, and obviously we could then add threads on top of async. What is the point of multithreading and async but to worry about speed/performance? And therein is why my answer is pertinent. My mistake was not in the answer, but rather in my comment. Sep 14, 2021 at 20:16
  • Once I get one more negative, I'll delete this for the peer pressure badge. None of you need my research, right? Any Takers? Sep 14, 2021 at 20:33
-1
 public static void RunTasks(List<NamedTask> importTaskList)
    {
        List<NamedTask> runningTasks = new List<NamedTask>();

        try
        {
            foreach (NamedTask currentTask in importTaskList)
            {
                currentTask.Start();
                runningTasks.Add(currentTask);

                if (runningTasks.Where(x => x.Status == TaskStatus.Running).Count() >= MaxCountImportThread)
                {
                    Task.WaitAny(runningTasks.ToArray());
                }
            }

            Task.WaitAll(runningTasks.ToArray());
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Log.Fatal("ERROR!", ex);
        }
    }
-1

you can use the BlockingCollection, If the consume collection limit has reached, the produce will stop producing until a consume process will finish. I find this pattern more easy to understand and implement than the SemaphoreSlim.

int TasksLimit = 10;
BlockingCollection<Task> tasks = new BlockingCollection<Task>(new ConcurrentBag<Task>(), TasksLimit);

void ProduceAndConsume()
{
    var producer = Task.Factory.StartNew(RunProducer);
    var consumer = Task.Factory.StartNew(RunConsumer);

    try
    {
        Task.WaitAll(new[] { producer, consumer });
    }
    catch (AggregateException ae) { }
}

void RunConsumer()
{
    foreach (var task in tasks.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        task.Start();
    }
}

void RunProducer()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        tasks.Add(new Task(() => Thread.Sleep(1000), TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent));
    }
}

Note that the RunProducer and RunConsumer has spawn two independent tasks.

7
  • I guess that the OP also wants to know when their tasks will all be completed. This solution is missing this functionality. Mar 24, 2020 at 22:13
  • Hey @TheodorZoulias, thanks for the comment, not sure I did understand, you will know when all the tasks will be completed after the Task.WaitAll has finished Mar 25, 2020 at 6:10
  • 1
    After the Task.WaitAll the tasks producer and consumer will be completed, but some of the 1000 tasks that were added in the BlockingCollection will still be running. Mar 25, 2020 at 6:17
  • 1
    I've updated my answer, I believe there are times when you don't care to be not notified when all the tasks has completed. Mar 29, 2020 at 11:25
  • OK. I just noticed another problem though. The loop that consumes the BlockingCollection just starts the tasks, does not wait them to complete. Starting a task is not a CPU-intensive job, it happens practically instantly. So I think that all 1000 tasks will start immediately, and the objective of limiting the parallelism will not be achieved. Mar 29, 2020 at 11:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.