1

How can I refactor such that scoring above a specific number of points is unrepresentable?

For example, how can I take the following code and make the compiler reject any shot that would exceed an overall score of 11 points?

let results = (player1, player2) |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   ThreeFoulShots
                                 |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   TwoFoulShots
                                 |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer

The output for the above code is the following:

 val results : FoulShooter * FieldShooter =
  (FoulShooter {Score = 11;}, FieldShooter {Score = 0;})

Now I want to structure my code such that making an additional shot cannot be compiled.

For example, I want the compiler to reject an additional foul shot that would exceed 11 points:

let results = (player1, player2) |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   ThreeFoulShots
                                 |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   TwoFoulShots
                                 |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   FoulShot

Currently, the code above is legal.

The entire code is below:

(*Types*)
type Player = { Score:int }

type FieldShot = TwoPointer| ThreePointer
type FoulShots = FoulShot  | TwoFoulShots | ThreeFoulShots

type FoulShooter  = FoulShooter  of Player
type FieldShooter = FieldShooter of Player

(*Functions*)
let shoot lastShot player =
    (player.Score + lastShot)

let fieldShot (fieldShooter, shot) =

    let player = match fieldShooter with
                 | FieldShooter player -> player

    match player.Score with
    | score when score >= 11 -> score
    | _ ->  match (fieldShooter, shot) with
            | FieldShooter player, shot -> match shot with
                                           | TwoPointer   -> player |> shoot 2
                                           | ThreePointer -> player |> shoot 3

let foulShot (foulShooter, shot) =

    let player = match foulShooter with
                 | FoulShooter player -> player

    match player.Score with
    | score when score >= 11 -> score
    | _ ->  match (foulShooter, shot) with
            | FoulShooter player, shot -> match shot with
                                          | FoulShot       -> player |> shoot 1
                                          | TwoFoulShots   -> player |> shoot 2
                                          | ThreeFoulShots -> player |> shoot 3

let makeFoulShots foulShots (shooter, defender) = 
    FieldShooter { Score= foulShot (shooter, foulShots) }, defender

let makeFieldBasket fieldBasket (shooter, defender) =
    FoulShooter { Score= fieldShot (shooter, fieldBasket) }, defender

let turnover (shooter, defender) = (defender, shooter)

(*Client*)
let player1, player2 = FieldShooter { Score=0 } ,
                       FieldShooter { Score=0 }

let results = (player1, player2) |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   ThreeFoulShots
                                 |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   TwoFoulShots
                                 |> makeFieldBasket TwoPointer
                                 |> makeFoulShots   FoulShot
  • Have you tired using an enum? Why do you want the compiler to catch the error and not a run time? I am pretty sure you can get the complier to do this, but I don't know of anyway that is common to F#. Look at the answers by Gustavo or maybe kvb – Guy Coder Apr 12 '16 at 23:27
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    One way is to abuse units of measure and make the score be something like points=1.0<finished>. – John Palmer Apr 12 '16 at 23:29
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    @ScottNimrod one of the possibilities - create custom numeric type: tomasp.net/blog/fsharp-custom-numeric.aspx It's not very easy but could work – Petr Apr 13 '16 at 0:46
  • 2
    "I thought that this was a huge selling point on functional programming?" Only by degrees, and only for a subset of languages. Some FP languages, such as Clojure and Erlang, don't have static types at all. Even the statically typed languages can only implement domain rules via their type systems to a degree. I find F#'s type system stronger than C#'s, because it lets me encode some rules as types that I wouldn't be able to do in C#. Haskell's type system is, IMO, 'stronger' than F#'s, and then Idris is supposedly stronger yet (but I have no experience with it). – Mark Seemann Apr 13 '16 at 6:29
  • 1
    IIRC, I found this article about strong functional programming illuminating some years ago. – Mark Seemann Apr 13 '16 at 6:34
5

The feature you are wishing for (and you're not the only one!) is called dependent typing (Wikipedia, and a quick introduction). Your particular example, more precisely, would be called a refinement type, because the dependence of type Score on the value n is expressed by a predicate, in this case n <= 11.

Supporting dependent types is no easy feat. It requires the compiler to run a full theorem prover program in order to properly check all possible execution routes in your code and ensure that no, this function with an 'a -> Integer<11> signature is never going to return an output greater than 11.

Dependent types are currently not implemented in mainstream programming languages such as F#, Haskell, Erlang, or Clojure. However, they are implemented in a few academic and/or research languages, usually in a mathematical context; the Wikipedia article above probably has the complete list.

If you need to do serious work with dependent types, Coq is the most mature and well established among them, while Agda probably comes next and is significantly more modern.

Otherwise, if you're just working on a personal project, you may want to check out F*, which is a dependently-typed language in active development that is based on, and compiles to, F#, and should be the easiest one for you to pick up.


Now, assuming that we'll be stuck with "only" F# for the current decade or so, the traditional solution to your problem is to store the possibly-invalid value in a discriminated union.

A simple DU with a custom + operator will prevent you from accidentally adding up to an invalid score:

type Score = InvalidScore | ValidScore of int<pts>

let (+) s1 s2 = match (s1, s2) with
   | ValidScore a, ValidScore b when (a + b) <= 11<pts> -> ValidScore (a + b)
   | _ -> InvalidScore

If you also want to prevent yourself from creating an invalid score in the first place, then we need a slightly more complex implementation based on accessor modifiers.

That is, we can put the whole thing into a module, make the two subclasses of the DU private to that module, and only expose safe methods / properties, like this:

[<AutoOpen>]
module Score = 

    type Score = private InvalidScore | ValidScore of int<pts> with
       static member Create n = 
          if n > 11<pts> then InvalidScore else ValidScore n
       member this.GetPoints = 
          match this with 
          | InvalidScore -> None 
          | ValidScore x -> Some x

    let (+) s1 s2 = 
       match (s1, s2) with
       | ValidScore a, ValidScore b when (a + b) <= 11<pts> -> ValidScore (a + b)
       | _ -> InvalidScore


let x = ValidScore 12<pts> // won't compile

let y = Score.Create 12<pts> // compiles, but if you call y.GetPoints you get None
0

To the best of my knowledge, there is no way of achieving that at compile time. A custom numeric type can help you keep operations within the valid range, and represent (or fail on) overflow - but it will not help at compile time. (Ab)using units of measure will have the same problem. I think you would have to go to the level of running a theorem prover like Z3 on your code to establish that repeated addition of points will lead you outside the valid range.

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