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I have been trying to understand Java generics properly.So in this quest I have come accross one principle " Principle of Truth In Advertising", I am tring to understand this in simple language.

The Principle of Truth in Advertising: the reified type of an array must be a subtype of the erasure of its static type.

I have written sample code .java and .class files as follows.Please go through code and please explain what part(in code) designates/indicates what part of above statement.

I have written comments to I think I should not write description of code here.

public class ClassA {

    //when used this method throws exception
    //java.lang.ClassCastException: [Ljava.lang.Object; cannot be cast to [Ljava.lang.String;
    public static <T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> collection) {

        //Array created here is of Object type
        T[] array = (T[]) new Object[collection.size()];

        int i = 0;
        for (T item : collection) {
            array[i++] = item;
        }
        return array;
    }

    //Working fine , no exception
    public static <T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> collection, T[] array) {
        if (array.length < collection.size()) {
            //Array created here is of correct intended type and not actually Object type
            //So I think , it inidicates "the reified type of an array" as type here lets say String[]
            // is subtype of Object[](the erasure ), so actually no problem
            array = (T[]) Array.newInstance(array.getClass().getComponentType(), collection.size());
        }

        int i = 0;
        for (T item : collection) {
            array[i++] = item;
        }
        return array;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<String> list = Arrays.asList("A", "B");
        String[] strings = toArray(list);
//        String[] strings = toArray(list,new String[]{});
        System.out.println(strings);
    }
}

Please try to explain in simple language.Please point out where I am wrong. Corrected code with more comments is appreciated.

Thank you all

2
  • The problem is a String is an Object, but an Object is not always a String (everything but primitives is an Object), so an array of objects cannot be cast to an array of strings – user180100 Apr 13 '16 at 5:34
  • One solution is to use docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/… – user180100 Apr 13 '16 at 5:38
9

I refer to Java Generics and Collections as the Book and the Book's authors as the Authors.

I would upvote this question more than once as the Book makes a poor job of explaining the principle IMO.

Statement

Principle of Truth in Advertising: the reified type of an array must be a subtype of the erasure of its static type.

Further referred to as the Principle.

How does the principle help?

  • Follow it and the code will compile and run without exceptions
  • Do not follow it and the code will compile, but throw an exception at runtime.

Vocabulary

What is a static type?

Should be called the reference type.

Provided A and B are types, in the following code

A ref = new B();

A is the static type of ref (B is the dynamic type of ref). Academia parlance term.

What is the reified type of an array?

Reification means type information available at runtime. Arrays are said to be reifiable because the VM knows their component type (at runtime).

In arr2 = new Number[30], the reified type of arr2 is Number[] an array type with component type Number.

What is the erasure of a type?

Should be called the runtime type.

The virtual machine's view (the runtime view) of a type parameter. Provided T is a type parameter, the runtime view of the following code

<T extends Comparable<T>> void stupidMethod(T[] elems) {
    T first = elems[0];
}

will be

void stupidMethod(Comparable[] elems) {
    Comparable first = elems[0];
}

That makes Comparable the runtime type of T. Why Comparable? Because that's the leftmost bound of T.

What kind of code do I look at so that the Principle is relevant?

The code should imply assignment to a reference of array type. Either the lvalue or the rvalue should involve a type parameter.

e.g. provided T is a type parameter

T[] a = (T[])new Object[0]; // type parameter T involved in lvalue

or

String[] a = toArray(s); // type parameter involved in rvalue
// where the signature of toArray is
<T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> c);

The principle is not relevant where there are no type parameters involved in either lvalue or rvalue.

Example 1 (Principle followed)

<T extends Number> void stupidMethod(List<T>elems) {
    T[] ts = (T[]) new Number[0];
}

Q1: What is the reified type of the array ts is referencing?

A1: Array creation provides the answer: an array with component type Number is created using new. Number[].

Q2: What is the static type of ts?

A2: T[]

Q3: What is the erasure of the static type of ts?

A3: For that we need the erasure of T. Given that T extends Number is bounded, T's erasure type is its leftmost boundary - Number. Now that we know the erasure type for T, the erasure type for ts is Number[]

Q4: Is the Principle followed?

A4: restating the question. Is A1 a subtype of A3? i.e. is Number[] a subtype of Number[]? Yes => That means the Principle is followed.

Example 2 (Principle not followed)

<T extends Number> void stupidMethod(List<T>elems) {
    T[] ts = (T[]) new Object[0];
}

Q1: What is the reified type of the array ts is referencing?

A1: Array creation using new, component type is Object, therefore Object[].

Q2: What is the static type of ts?

A2: T[]

Q3: What is the erasure of the static type of ts?

A3: For that we need the erasure of T. Given that T extends Number is bounded, T's erasure type is its leftmost boundary - Number. Now that we know the erasure type for T, the erasure type for ts is Number[]

Q4: Is the Principle followed?

A4: restating the question. Is A1 a subtype of A3? i.e. is Object[] a subtype of Number[]? No => That means the Principle is not followed.

Expect an exception to be thrown at runtime.

Example 3 (Principle not followed)

Given the method providing an array

<T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> c){
    return (T[]) new Object[0];
}

client code

List<String> s = ...;
String[] arr = toArray(s);

Q1: What is the reified type of the array returned by the providing method?

A1: for that you need too look in the providing method to see how it's initialized - new Object[...]. That means the reified type of the array returned by the method is Object[].

Q2: What is the static type of arr?

A2: String[]

Q3: What is the erasure of the static type of ts?

A3: No type parameters involved. The type after erasure is the same as the static type String[].

Q4: Is the Principle followed?

A4: restating the question. Is A1 a subtype of A3? i.e. is Object[] a subtype of String[]? No => That means the Principle is not followed.

Expect an exception to be thrown at runtime.

Example 4 (Principle followed)

Given the method providing an array

<T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> initialContent, Class<T> clazz){
    T[] result = (T[]) Array.newInstance(clazz, initialContent);
    // Copy contents to array. (Don't use this method in production, use Collection.toArray() instead)
    return result;
}

client code

List<Number> s = ...;
Number[] arr = toArray(s, Number.class);

Q1: What is the reified type of the array returned by the providing method?

A1: array created using reflection with component type as received from the client. The answer is Number[].

Q2: What is the static type of arr?

A2: Number[]

Q3: What is the erasure of the static type of ts?

A3: No type parameters involved. The type after erasure is the same as the static type Number[].

Q4: Is the Principle followed?

A4: restating the question. Is A1 a subtype of A3? i.e. is Number[] a subtype of Number[]? Yes => That means the Principle is followed.

What's in a funny name?

Ranting here. Truth in advertising may mean selling what you state you are selling.

In lvalue = rvalue we have rvalue as the provider and lvalue as the receiver. It might be that the Authors thought of the provider as the Advertiser.

Referring to the providing method in Example 3 above,

<T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> c){
    return (T[]) new Object[0];
}

the method signature

<T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> c);

may be read as an advertisement: Give me a List of Longs and I will give you an array of Longs.

However looking in the method body, the implementation shows that the method is not being truthful, as the array it creates and returns is an array of Objects.

So toArray method in Example 3 lies in its marketing campaigns.

In Example 4, the providing method is being truthful as the statement in the signature (Give me a collection and its type parameter as a class literal and I will give you an array with that component type) matches with what happens in the body.

Examples 3 and 4 have method signatures to act as advertisement.

Examples 1 and 2 do not have an explicit advertisement (method signature). The advertisement and the provision are intertwined.

Nevertheless, I could think of no better name for the Principle. That is a hell of a name.

Closing remarks

I consider the statement of the principle unnecessarily cryptic due to use of terms like static type and erasure type. Using reference type and runtime type/type after erasure, respectively, would make it considerably easier to grasp to the Java layman (like yours truly).

The Authors state the Book is the best on Java Generics [0]. I think that means the audience they address is a broad one and therefore more examples for the principles they introduce would be very helpful.

[0] https://youtu.be/GOMovkQCYD4?t=53

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  • Very helpful answer. Nice job. – solveMe Sep 6 '20 at 9:41
3

Think of it that way:

T[] array = (T[]) new Object[collection.size()]; A new Array is created. Due to language design, the type of T is unkown during runtime. In your example you know for a fact T is String, but the from the viewpoint of the vm T is Object. All casting operations are happening in the calling method.

So in toArray an array Object[] is created. The type parameter is more or less syntactic sugar which has no consequence for the bytecode created.

So why can't an array of objects be casted to an array of strings?

Let's have an example:

void methodA(){
  Object[] array = new Object[10];
  array[0]=Integer.valueOf(10);
  array[1]=Object.class;
  array[2]=new Object();
  array[3]="Hello World";
  methodB((String[])array);
}
void methodB(String[] stringArray){
  String aString=stringArray[1]; //This is not a String, but Object.class!
}

If you could cast an array, you'd say "all elements I've added before are of a valid subtype". But since your array is of type Object, the vm can't guarantee the array will always under all circumstances contain valid subtypes.

methodB thinks it deals with an array of Strings, but in reality the array does contain very different types.

The other way around does not work either:

void methodA(){
  String[] array = new String[10];
  array[0]="Hello World";
  methodB((Object[])array);
  //Method B had controll over the array and could have added any object, especially a non-string!
  System.out.println(array[1]); 
}
void methodB(Object[] oArray){
  oArray[1]=Long.valueOf(2);
}

I hope this helps a little bit.

Edit: After reading your question again, I think you are mixing to things:

  1. Arrays can't be casted (as I explained above)
  2. The cited sentence does say in plain English: "If you create an array of type A, all elements in this array must be of type A or a of a subtype of A". So if you create an array of Object you can put any java object into to array, but if you create an array of Number the values have to be of type Number (Long, Double, ...). All in all the sentence is rather trivial. Or I didn't understand it either ;)

Edit 2: As a matter of fact you can cast an array to any type you want. That is, you can cast an array as you can cast any type to String (String s=(String)Object.class;). Especially you can cast a String[] to an Object[] and the other way around. As I pointed out in the examples, this operation introduces potential bugs in great numbers, since reading/writing to the array will likely fail. I can think of no situation where it is a good decision to cast an array. There might be situations (like generalized utility classes) where it seems to be a good solution, but I still would suggest to overthink the design if you find yourself in a situation where you want to cast an array. Thanks to newacct for pointing out the cast operation itself is valid.

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  • Nice explanation, Thanks. So as per code in my problem statement, it means the statement boils down to " the reified type(String) of an array(created) must be a subtype(only subtype) of the erasure of its static type(Object)." ? – Gagandeep Singh Apr 13 '16 at 8:13
  • 1
    I'd say the next paragraph in the book explains it pretty well: "The principle is obeyed within the body of toArray itself [...] but not in the main method, where T has been bound to String but the reified type of the array is still Object. – samjaf Apr 13 '16 at 9:11
  • true , wording+lack to generics knowledge confused the hell out of me. Reading this chapter multiple times – Gagandeep Singh Apr 13 '16 at 9:15
  • Generics are indeed hard to understand as they are counter intuitive in many regards. Nevertheless the restrictions are consistent and logical. As soon as one understands the consequences of type erasure generics are less confusing. – samjaf Apr 13 '16 at 10:42
  • "Arrays can't be casted" is plain wrong. You can cast array references like you can cast any other object reference. Casts will succeed when the actual runtime class of the object is a subclass of the type casted to. In your second example, the cast in (Object[])array is completely unnecessary since it's an upcast and guaranteed to succeed. methodB(array); works fine. That methodB causes an exception with what it does internally is a completely unrelated issue. – newacct Apr 13 '16 at 19:07

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