32

It seems like every introductory document for Rust's enum types explains how to match on an enum object that you own, but what if you do not own the enum object and you just have a reference to it that you want to match against? I don't know what the syntax would be.

Here is some code where I attempt to match on a reference to an enum:

use std::fmt;
use std::io::prelude::*;

pub enum Animal {
    Cat(String),
    Dog,
}

impl fmt::Display for Animal {
    fn fmt(&self, f: &mut fmt::Formatter) -> fmt::Result {
        match self {
            Animal::Cat(c) => f.write_str("c"),
            Animal::Dog => f.write_str("d"),
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    let p: Animal = Animal::Cat("whiskers".to_owned());
    println!("{}", p);
}

The Rust Playground gives errors on the first two cases of the match when trying to compile it:

error[E0308]: mismatched types
  --> src/main.rs:12:13
   |
12 |             Animal::Cat(c) => f.write_str("c"),
   |             ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ expected &Animal, found enum `Animal`
   |
   = note: expected type `&Animal`
   = note:    found type `Animal`

error[E0308]: mismatched types
  --> src/main.rs:13:13
   |
13 |             Animal::Dog => f.write_str("d"),
   |             ^^^^^^^^^^^ expected &Animal, found enum `Animal`
   |
   = note: expected type `&Animal`
   = note:    found type `Animal`

How can I change that code to get it to compile? I tried adding ampersands in lots of different places without any luck. Is it even possible to match on a reference to an enum?

17

As of Rust 1.26, the idiomatic way is the way that you originally wrote it because match ergonomics have been improved:

use std::fmt;

pub enum Animal {
    Cat(String),
    Dog,
}

impl fmt::Display for Animal {
    fn fmt(&self, f: &mut fmt::Formatter) -> fmt::Result {
        match self {
            Animal::Cat(_) => f.write_str("c"),
            Animal::Dog => f.write_str("d"),
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    let p: Animal = Animal::Cat("whiskers".to_owned());
    println!("{}", p);
}
  • I found a few extra subtleties by playing around: 1. You can keep ref in front of the inner value c, it will do the same as without (as long as you remove the & in front of the enum variant). 2. If you keep & in front of the enum variant Cat but remove ref c, it will try to move/copy the inner value c! For a borrowed content it can't move out, and will fail to compile. 3. You can also skip &mut and ref mut in &mut Enum::Variant(ref mut value). You must still write *value = new_value. And sorry for the bad formatting due to comment limitations. – hsandt Dec 26 '18 at 16:30
  • Found an example in the Rust Book (not mut though): doc.rust-lang.org/book/… Listing 15-25 – hsandt Dec 26 '18 at 16:35
  • But why ? Is there an explanation for that rule ? – chylli Feb 24 '19 at 2:31
  • @chylli updated with a link to the RFC that make the changes. Is that what you were looking for? – Shepmaster Feb 24 '19 at 14:45
24

The idiomatic way would be

match *self {
    Animal::Cat(ref c) => f.write_str("c"),
    Animal::Dog => f.write_str("d"),
}

You can use _ instead of ref c to silence the "unused" warning.

  • 4
    Or .. to ignore multiple values. – Shepmaster Apr 13 '16 at 12:50
  • Is there any difference between this and the answer below (stackoverflow.com/a/36590693/86381) where each branch of the match is prefaced by &? – ehdv Sep 27 '16 at 21:16
  • @ehdv I wouldn't think so, but I haven't compared the generated assembly yet. – WiSaGaN Sep 29 '16 at 13:08
  • 5
    I've seen at least on one occasion code where the other answer would compile fine, but this one would complain that "cannot move out of borrowed content". – b0fh Mar 20 '17 at 12:08
  • How do you reference the inner type c in the first match branch arm? – Paul-Sebastian Manole Jan 22 at 16:09
12

I figured it out thanks to helpful compiler messages:

match self {
    &Animal::Cat(ref c) => f.write_str("c"),
    &Animal::Dog => f.write_str("d"),
}

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