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As the title says I want to make a search algorithm that combines linearSearch and binarySearch. If the array has less than 20 elements I want to use linearSearch and otherwise binary Search.

-the array should be sorted.

-the array is of element of the type Comparable.

-The algorithm should return the index where the elements is found otherwise it should return -1

my code, but im a bit stuck.. am I on the right track?

public class SearchAlgorithm<T extends Comparable<T>> {

public int linearSearch(T[] Array, T find){
    int temp = 0; 
    for(int i = 0; i < Array.length; i++){
        if(Array[i] == find){
            temp = i;
        }
        else{
            temp = -1;
        }
    }
    return temp;

}
public int binarySearch(T[] Array, T find){
    int lowIdx = 0;
    int highIdx = Array.length-1;
    int middleIdx = 0;

    while(lowIdx <= highIdx){
        middleIdx = (highIdx + lowIdx)/2;
        int comp = find.compareTo(Array[middleIdx]);

        if(comp < 0)
            lowIdx = middleIdx + 1;

        else if(comp > 0)
            highIdx = middleIdx -1;

        else{
            lowIdx = highIdx+1;
            return middleIdx;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}
public void combinedSearch(T[] Arr, T find){
    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    if(Arr.length < 20){
        linearSearch(Arr,find);
    }
    else{
        binarySearch(Arr,find);
    }
    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("combinedSearch took: "+(endTime-startTime)+ "ms");
}
public static void main(String[] args){
    int[] a = {1,2,3,4,5};
    binarySearch(a,4);
}

}

  • It takes at least a million elements before your timing method returns anything significant ! – Yves Daoust Apr 13 '16 at 14:46
  • So what is the time complexity for this kind of search algorithm? isnt that just dependeble on the amount of elements in the array? if its under 20 elements its just O(N) because then it chooses LinearSearch and O(log N) if its over 20 elements? – JohnBanana Apr 13 '16 at 15:47
  • no. The asymptotic notation is for unbounded N only (N arbitrarily large). "Under 20 elements" is irrelevant because this is bounded. – Yves Daoust Apr 13 '16 at 15:52
  • Notwithstanding the (significant) issues with time complexity and asymptotic behavior of this algorithm, you are bringing in generics unnecessarily. The code, as written, wouldn't even compile (non-static methods called from static context, int[] can't be provided where T[] is needed ...) – Kedar Mhaswade Apr 13 '16 at 17:15
  • A note on optimization. I did some testing a few years back in .NET (which I fully understand is different than Java), and found that sequentially searching a list of integers is faster than binary search when the list contains fewer than about 10 elements. As the cost of comparison increased, the sequential search's margin decreased. When comparing 10-character strings that differed only in the last character, the sequential search lost out to binary search at about 5 elements. My point here is that if you're doing this for education, great. But as an optimization, it's not very effective. – Jim Mischel Apr 13 '16 at 18:13
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For your linear search

if(Array[i] == find){
        temp = i;
    }
    else{
        temp = -1;
    }

You set it -1 every time it doesn't match. It should be something like :

int temp = -1; 
for(int i = 0; i < Array.length; i++){
    if(Array[i] == find){
        temp = i;
        return temp;
    }
}
return temp;

Also for your binary search, you should reverse the comparison. Number you are finding is in left half if its less than mid and so on.

if(comp > 0)
        lowIdx = middleIdx + 1;

    else if(comp < 0)
        highIdx = middleIdx -1;

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