3

I have a data.table which contains several binary columns with the same values that I would like to recode in one operation. I have modified a function that was originally written for data.frames, but am not sure if I am really capitalizing on the speed of data.table with the way I have modified it: specifically I suspect the function might still be copying values.

How can I make sure that the function replaces values by reference?

Here is a toy data set:

# Example data:
id <- c(1,2,3,4,5)
fruit <- c("apple", "orange", "banana", "strawbery", "rasberry")
mydate <- c("2015-09-01", "2015-09-02", "2015-11-15", "2016-02-24", "2016-03-08")
eaten <- c("y", "y", "n", "y", "u")
present <- c("n", "n", "y", "y", "y")

dt <- data.table(id, fruit, mydate, eaten, present)
dt[, mydate := as.Date(mydate, format = "%Y-%m-%d")]
dt[, sex := c("m", "f", "f", "m", "f")]

# Columns to update:
bincols <- c("eaten", "present")

Before recoding, the data looks like this:

> dt
   id     fruit     mydate eaten present sex
1:  1     apple 2015-09-01     y       n   m
2:  2    orange 2015-09-02     y       n   f
3:  3    banana 2015-11-15     n       y   f
4:  4 strawbery 2016-02-24     y       y   m
5:  5  rasberry 2016-03-08     u       y   f

Here is the function:

recode.multi <- function(datacols, oldval, newval) {
  for (i in 1:length(datacols)) {
    datacols[datacols == oldval[i]] = newval[i]
  }
  datacols
}

... applied to the data:

dt[, (bincols) := lapply(.SD, recode.multi, oldval = c("u", "n", "y"), newval = c(NA_real_, 0, 1)), .SDcols = bincols]

... and the output, which updates the values as desired but not sure if it is copying the columns during this process?

> dt
   id     fruit     mydate eaten present sex
1:  1     apple 2015-09-01     1       0   m
2:  2    orange 2015-09-02     1       0   f
3:  3    banana 2015-11-15     0       1   f
4:  4 strawbery 2016-02-24     1       1   m
5:  5  rasberry 2016-03-08    NA       1   f

I tried changing the last '=' in the function to ':=' but got an error re checking whether 'datacols' was a data.table. Adding a clause to the function to check if is.data.table == TRUE didn't solve the problem (same error returned).

Any thoughts on the most data.table appropriate way to approach this function would be much appreciated.

  • Unsure about the copying, but this is a fine bit of code. I am unsure what you mean here: "I tried changing the last = in the function to :=." Which = were you trying to change? – lmo Apr 13 '16 at 17:21
  • I tried: recode.multi <- function(datacols, oldval, newval) { for (i in 1:length(datacols)) { datacols[datacols == oldval[i]] := newval[i] } datacols } – Amy M Apr 13 '16 at 17:40
2

This is similar to Frank's but lets the arguments be passed to a function that builds the translation vector and returns the translation. You don't need to do the loop inside the function since the lapply , the :=, and the .SDcols functions are doing the looping inside [.data.table.

recode_dt <- function(datacol, oldval, newval) 
    { trans <- setNames(newval, oldval)
     trans[ datacol ]   }

dt[, (bincols) := lapply(.SD, recode_dt, oldval = c("u", "n", "y"), 
                                         newval = c(NA_real_, 0, 1)), 
     .SDcols = bincols]
dt
#===============
   id     fruit     mydate eaten present sex
1:  1     apple 2015-09-01     1       0   m
2:  2    orange 2015-09-02     1       0   f
3:  3    banana 2015-11-15     0       1   f
4:  4 strawbery 2016-02-24     1       1   m
5:  5  rasberry 2016-03-08    NA       1   f

Note that your columns were not actually factors as it appeared you thought from one of your comments. They might have been had you built a data.frame as an intermediate step.

  • Interesting, the columns have named elements inside the RHS of LHS := RHS, but not after assignment. I mean dt[, str(lapply(.SD, recode_dt, oldval = c("u", "n", "y"), newval = c(NA_real_, 0, 1))), .SDcols = bincols] – Frank Apr 13 '16 at 18:41
  • 1
    That's not really much different than data.frame behavior. Names usually get thrown away, except for names of the first column that then get turned into rownames. – 42- Apr 13 '16 at 18:53
  • +1 for the use of setNames, I was thinking there might be a way to use 'set'. I also like that it automatically converted the updated vectors from character to numeric as well. – Amy M Apr 13 '16 at 19:11
  • 1
    It will return a vector of the same class as newval. Frank had a good point that supplying integer might be better. Also setNames is not a data.table function, despite its first three letters. – 42- Apr 13 '16 at 19:31
2

I would do...

recodeDT = data.table(old = c("u", "n", "y"), new = c(NA_integer_, 0L, 1L), key = "old")

dt[, (bincols) := lapply(.SD, function(x) recodeDT[.(x), new]), .SDcols = bincols]

I think it's better to store any finite remapping in a table for clarity, but I don't know if it is more efficient. If you were storing your variables as factors, you could simply tweak the levels, which should be very fast. You could use setattr(x, "levels", z), maybe.

Side note: You probably want to code these as integers instead of floats.

  • 1
    Thanks - hadn't thought of using a keyed lookup table approach. I have avoided converting character vectors to factors, because of the difficulties encountered if adding extra levels, but can see how this would be efficient for this situation. – Amy M Apr 13 '16 at 18:16
1

In order to determine if my original solution was copying values or not, I applied mine, Frank and 42's solutions to my real data set which has 8933 observations and 150 columns to update with the function. Results from system.time below:

@Amy M: 332.82 seconds

@Frank: 0.15 seconds

@42 (original): 4.13 seconds

@42 (with @Frank's modification): 0.05 seconds

Both Frank and 42's solutions are far faster than mine (so mine must be copying).

I have reprinted the fastest solution (42 with Frank's modification) below:

recode.multi <- function(datacol, oldval, newval) {
  trans <- setNames(newval, oldval)
  trans[ match(datacol, names(trans)) ]
} 
  • 1
    That's an interesting result. Maybe if you switch the last line of -42's function to trans[ match(datacol, names(trans)) ] it will be faster. I guess the number of distinct values and the number of times each distinct value repeats in your data might matter. – Frank Apr 13 '16 at 20:23
  • Or just rewrite the entire function as newvals[ match(datacol, oldvals) ] – Frank Apr 13 '16 at 20:24
  • 1
    I couldn't get your second suggestion to work, but modifying the last line of 42's function does result in a gain in speed: time elapsed is 0.05 seconds. – Amy M Apr 14 '16 at 9:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.