16

Jsfiddle showing the issue: https://jsfiddle.net/ibrewster/g6v2x7ku/12/

Note how the pink div expands beyond the boarders of the blue div.

I'm trying to make a simple layout where I have two nested divs that expand up to a certain height (100% of the window height is desired in this case), with the inner div scrolling as needed to show additional content. So if the content is short, the divs all collapse down to the size of the content, but if it is long they only expand to a point, at which time the inner div should scroll.

The HTML:

<div id="topDiv">
  <div id="insideDiv">
    Some inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br>
  </div>
</div>

And the CSS:

html,
body {
  height: 100%;
}

#topDiv {
  background-color: lightblue;
  max-height: 50px;
  width: 100%;
  padding: 10px;
}

#insideDiv {
  background-color: pink;
  max-height: 100%;
  overflow-y:auto;
}

Note that the effect is the same if the max-height of topDiv is set to a percentage, under which scenario I can't simply set the max-height value of insideDiv to an appropriately smaller value. Also, setting the overflow property on topDiv to hidden doesn't work - the extra content in insideDiv is simply completely hidden then, not accessible by scrolling.

How can I limit the height of insideDiv to not exceed the height of topDiv, with insideDiv scrolling any extra content as needed?

  • max-height:inherit, assuming you'll always set the max-height on your parent. Would also want to put box-sizing: border-box; on #insideDiv so you can freely set its padding/borders. – abluejelly Apr 13 '16 at 20:39
  • What about overflow: scroll – Abhi Apr 13 '16 at 20:39
  • @Abhi will always show the scrollbar, but will not restrict the height. Seems like the issue is that max-height as a percentage looks for a height on its parent, and can't find one, so you run into the usual "nondeterministic relative height" problem. – abluejelly Apr 13 '16 at 20:42
  • Why not to set the overflow on the outer div? jsfiddle.net/g6v2x7ku/23 nothing needs to be set on the inner one. – Stickers Apr 13 '16 at 21:15
  • 1
    @pangloss I've found the same effect either way. I used fixed pixels in my example because it was easier to show the issue, but yes, my production code uses percent. – ibrewster Apr 13 '16 at 22:36
26

You can change your #insideDiv's max-height CSS property from 100% to inherit. So this rule will be like this:

max-height: inherit;

You also might want to add box-sizing:border-box; if you go this route, as that will allow any borders or padding on #insideDiv to behave as (probably) desired.


The cause of this issue is that max-height:100%; looks for the parent's height, not its max-height for how tall it's allowed to be. Thus, you end up with the classic non-deterministic relative height problem. If you give the parent a deterministic height (rather than max-height), 100% can resolve deterministically.

  • It looks like this should work, I'll have to make sure I didn't oversimplify the issue such that it breaks on my production code :) – ibrewster Apr 13 '16 at 20:52
  • 3
    Will probably also want box-sizing:border-box so any border/padding changes on #insideDiv still behave right. As to why I made a comment instead of an answer: I felt that using inherit here is a tad.... hacky? Technically you should put the height limit on #insideDiv with this setup, so I didn't wanna say it "solved" the problem- more just worked around it. Kudos for noting the comments had it, btw. Not enough people do that. – abluejelly Apr 13 '16 at 20:55
  • In fact it was the first thing I tried and worked. If the best practice is to implement it in another way, then the OP should go ahead and use that way (I confess that I am a bit lazy and unorthodox sometimes). Just a moment after posting my answer, I saw your comment, so I'd thought it would be appropriate to mention your contribution, so I edited. Feel free to make any edits you think are necessary. – Arkoudinos Apr 13 '16 at 21:04
  • @abluejelly: Agreed re: box-sizing. I find I need that quite often. I'll have to look at setting the height limit on #insideDiv - I didn't do that at first because with the actual, non-simplified code it seemed more straight forward to set the height of the outer div. It might still work though. – ibrewster Apr 13 '16 at 21:04
  • @Arkoudinos Nah dude you're fine, and I do that too. Just thought I'd toss in my reasoning for not jumping to the answer post instead of the comments. I think I'll add an explanation as to why this was a problem, just gotta make sure I do it right – abluejelly Apr 13 '16 at 21:07
6

Try this flexbox layout, it works fine with either fixed or percentage height / max-height.

jsFiddle

html, body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}
#topDiv {
  background-color: lightblue;
  max-height: 50%;
  padding: 10px;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}
#insideDiv {
  background-color: pink;
  overflow-y: auto;
}
<div id="topDiv">
  <div>
    No scroll content
  </div>
  <div id="insideDiv">
    Some inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>More inside content
    <br>
  </div>
</div>

  • Nice! The overflow-y: auto; was all I needed to add. Perfect. – Forrest Apr 18 at 22:12
1

You need to move overflow-y:auto; to #topDiv

You can then modify your max-height values to whatever you want for either and they will work as expected.

  • that makes #topDiv be the one scrolling, and doesn't actually limit the height of #insideDiv – abluejelly Apr 13 '16 at 20:39
  • Ah, my mistake. I misread the issue. I agree with the other answers then. – Blake Neal Apr 13 '16 at 20:41
0

Based on my understanding of your question. This code should work very well!

html,
body {
  height: 100vh;
  width: 100%
  padding: 0px;
  margin: 0px;
}

#topDiv {
  padding: 10px;
  background-color: lightblue;
  width: calc (100% - 20px);
  max-height: calc(100vh - 20px);
}

#insideDiv {
  width: calc (100% - 40px);
  background-color: pink;
  max-height: inherit;
  overflow: scroll;
}
<div id="topDiv">
  <div id="insideDiv">
    Some inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br> More inside content
    <br>
  </div>
</div>

Here's a JSFiddle with the code as well.

  • No, I don't want the topDiv to scroll - I want the insideDiv to scroll, and never get large enough that the topDiv would even want to scroll. – ibrewster Apr 13 '16 at 20:43
  • Makes the parent div scroll, doesn't make the child div scroll. The issue is the child div has no height restriction. – abluejelly Apr 13 '16 at 20:43
  • @ibrewster Please try the updated Snippet! – Emmet Arries Apr 13 '16 at 20:45
  • 1
    So this doesn't really resolve the question as I posted it (it looks like max-height:inherit; is what I want) - the points made by ableujelly are spot-on. However, it actually did help a different issue I was dealing with, so thanks! – ibrewster Apr 13 '16 at 20:56
  • 1
    Indeed it does - of course, that uses the max-height inherit trick that other users have already answered, and has overflow: scroll rather than overflow: auto. Still, thanks! – ibrewster Apr 13 '16 at 21:02

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