6

Oh dear, I hope I got the title right. :)

How can one pass the **kwargs supplied to a wrapper-function definition, to another (enclosed) function call that it wraps. For example:

def wrapped_func(**kwargs):
   # Do some preparation stuff here.
   func('/path/to/file.csv', comma_separated_key=value_injected_here)
   # Do some other stuff.

So for example, this call:

wrapped_func(error_bad_lines=True, sep=':', skip_footer=0, ...)

Should result in this:

func('/path/to/file.csv', error_bad_lines=True, sep=':', skip_footer=0, ...)

I've tinkered with a variety of approaches over the past couple of hours, but each exposed type-preservation vulnerabilities (for the values). I've not used this particular wrapper pattern before, and was wondering if the community could give some help. Thank you in advance.

8
  • 1
    Care to explain what you mean about type-preservation vulnerabilities (in italics, no less)? What exactly changes? The code you show will, of course, not produce the result you say you expect, what is the actual code you are using?
    – kindall
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 22:59
  • 1
    Does func() also take **kwargs?
    – Natecat
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:00
  • Hi Natecat. Great question, unfortunately it doesn't. The function is actually 'pandas.read_csv()' (already implemented).
    – NYCeyes
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:02
  • 2
    @prismalytics.io actually they do Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:06
  • 1
    ** is the syntax for expanding dicts
    – Natecat
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:09

4 Answers 4

6

**kwargs is a dict, meaning you can use the double splat (**) to unpack it as a list of keyword arguments. So your wrapper function could be like this:

def wrapped_func(**kwargs):
   # Do some preparation stuff here.
   func('/path/to/file.csv', **kwargs)
   # Do some other stuff.
1
  • I upvoted this (and all of the helpful comments from you and others above, too) and checked it as the solution. Oh dear,... the issue was a total red-herring: It was a pandas exception, not the unpacking of **kwargs exception (which I had tried an hour ago -- but again, a red-herring pandas-specific error). Sometimes you need another set of eyes. Thank you all! :)
    – NYCeyes
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:18
2

An easy way to define a very custom wrapper is to define your own class:

class AdditionWrapper:
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
    def __call__(self, **kwargs):
        return self.func('/path/to/file.csv', **kwargs)

You could also make the path customizable:

class AdditionWrapper:
    _path = '/path/to/file.csv'
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
    def __call__(self, **kwargs):
        return self.func(self._path, **kwargs)
    def set_path(self, path):
        self._path = path

Use:

@AdditionWrapper
def myfunc(...):
    ...

myfunc.set_path(mypath)
1
  • Thank you zondo. This (the solution you posted) is more like the pattern that I generally use. It wasn't applicable in this case (mostly because I'm already using a Python metaclass (metaclass=abc.ABCMeta), in my code and didn't want one more level of indirection. =:). I upvoted you solution for it's alternative approach (one that I generally use).
    – NYCeyes
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:23
2

Why not simply merge the kwargs:

def func(*args, **kwargs):
    print args
    print kwargs


def wrapped_func(**kwargs):
    # Do some preparation stuff here.
    func('/path/to/file.csv', **dict(comma_separated_key='value_injected_here', **kwargs))
    # Do some other stuff.


wrapped_func(error_bad_lines=True, sep=':', skip_footer=0)

# Outputs:
('/path/to/file.csv',)
{'skip_footer': 0, 'error_bad_lines': True, 'comma_separated_key': 'value_injected_here', 'sep': ':'}
4
  • 1
    User has stated that func() isn't written by them
    – Natecat
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:05
  • 1
    Sure, i only wrote it to print what would arrive to the function. As long as all arguments match the ones defined by pandas.read_csv they will be set correctly.
    – fips
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:09
  • 1
    If he's wrapping the call to pandas.read_csv with some default values, then it's reasonable to be able to have the ability to merge and overwrite.
    – fips
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:16
  • Thank you guys (and girls in case user1434070). All comments valid and upvoted. Thank you for the suggestions and perspectives.
    – NYCeyes
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:26
2

Just use the same syntax when you call a function to expand the kwargs dict as keyword arguments:

func('/path/to/file.csv', **kwargs)

You can also pass in positional arguments in the same way

func('/path/to/file.csv', *args, **kwargs)

Here's a link to the Python docs on the subject: https://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/controlflow.html#unpacking-argument-lists

1
  • Thank you Peter. Yeah you, Natecat (and others) were/are correct. This was the first thing I tried as it made total sense to do that. But the particular pandas exception threw me for a loop (believing that the expansion wasn't happening correctly, when in reality it was expanding correctly but pandas choking on the 'sep=':' parameter I passed to it (again via **kwargs, which did expand). Oh brother. LOL You answer upvoted, too.
    – NYCeyes
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 23:32

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