I've created some Azure Webjobs that use triggers and I've just learnt about Azure Functions.

From what I understand Azure Functions seem to overlap with Azure Webjobs features and I have some difficulty to understand when to choose between Function and Webjob:

  • Unlike Webjobs, Functions can only be triggered, it hasn't been designed to run continuous process (but you can write code to create a continuous function).

  • You can write Webjobs and Functions using many languages (C#, node.js, python ...) but you can write your function from the Azure portal so it is easier and quicker to develop test and deploy a Function.

  • Webjobs run as background processes in the context of an App Service web app, API app, or mobile app whereas Functions run using a Classic/Dynamic App Service Plan.

  • Regarding the scaling, Functions seems to give more possibilities since you can use a dynamic app service plan and you can scale a single function whereas for a webjob you have to scale the whole web app.

So for sure there is a pricing difference, if you have an existing web app running you can use it to run a webjob without any additional cost but if I don't have an existing web app and I have to write code to trigger a queue should I use a webjob or a Function ?

Is there any other considerations to keep in mind when you need to choose ?

  • 6
    This is a blog post I owe. :) I'll try to prepare a response, but this may be a bit open ended for Stack Overflow, so you may need to ask this on MSDN if it gets closed. – Chris Anderson-MSFT Apr 14 '16 at 0:03
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    So Chris let me know when it will be available ^^. Cheers. – Thomas Apr 14 '16 at 0:06
  • Just replied. Let me know if there is anything you want more elaboration on. My wife is staring at me to leave work, so it may be a bit rushed here and there. – Chris Anderson-MSFT Apr 14 '16 at 0:45
  • No worry, it is not urgent ! Thanks a lot! – Thomas Apr 14 '16 at 0:49
  • Nice (short) blog post on this topic geekswithblogs.net/tmurphy/archive/2016/06/02/… – Todd Menier Aug 29 '16 at 14:59
up vote 128 down vote accepted

There are a couple options here within App Service. I won't touch on Logic Apps or Azure Automation, which also touch this space.

Azure WebJobs

This article is honestly the best explanation, but I'll summarize here.

On Demand WebJobs aka. Scheduled WebJobs aka. Triggered WebJobs

Triggered WebJobs are WebJobs which are run once when a URL is called or when the schedule property is present in schedule.job. Scheduled WebJobs are just WebJobs which have had an Azure Scheduler Job created to call our URL on a schedule, but we also support the schedule property, as mentioned previously.

Summary:

  • + Executable/Script on demand
  • + Scheduled executions
  • - Have to trigger via .scm endpoint
  • - Scaling is manual
  • - VM is always required

Continuous WebJobs (non SDK)

These jobs run forever and we will wake them up when they crash. You need to enable Always On for these to work, which means running them in Basic tier and above.

Summary:

  • + Executable/Script always running
  • - Requires always on - Basic tier and above
  • - VM is always required

Continuous WebJobs with the WebJobs SDK

These aren't anything from a "WebJobs the feature" point of view. Essentially, we have this sweet SDK we wrote targeting WebJobs which lets you execute code based on simple triggers. I'll talk about this more later on.

Summary:

  • + Executable/Script always running
  • + Richer logging/dashboard
  • + Triggers supported along with long running tasks
  • - Requires always on - Basic tier and above
  • - Scaling is manual to set up
  • - Getting started can be a bit tiresome
  • - VM is always required

Azure WebJobs SDK

Azure WebJobs SDK is a completely separate SDK from WebJobs the platform feature. It's designed to be run in a WebJob, but can really be run anywhere. We have customers who run them on worker roles and even on prem or other clouds, though support is only best effort.

The SDK is just about making it easy to run some code in reaction to some event and make binding to services/etc. easy. This is honestly best covered in some docs, but the heart of it is that "event" + "code" nature. We've also done some cool extensiblity work, but that's secondary to the core purpose.

Summary:

  • Most of these are mentioned above
  • + You can extend and run whatever you want. Full control.
  • - HTTP stuff is a little wonky, but it works

Azure Functions

Azure Functions is all about taking that core purpose of the WebJobs SDK, hosting it as a service, and making it easy to get started with other languages. We also introduce the "Serverless" concept here because it made a lot of sense to do so - we know how our SDK scales, so we can do intelligent things for you.

Azure Functions is a very heavily managed experience. We aren't supporting bringing your own host. Currently, we don't support custom extensions but its something we're investigating. We're opinionated about what you can and can't do, but for the things we enable, they are slick, and easy to use and manage.

Most of the "framework" things we've done to improve Functions go through the WebJobs SDK, though. For instance, we'll be uploading a new NuGet for WebJobs which really drastically increases the speed of logging, which has huge perf benefits for WebJobs SDK users. In shipping Functions as "WebJobs SDK as a Service" we've really improved a lot of experience issues.

I'm probably biased since Functions is our latest and greatest, but feel free to shoot more cons for Functions my way.

I'll probably end up publishing a blog which elaborates a bit more, but I tried to keep this as succinct as possible for this forum.

  • Thanks Chris, I am going to build some samples around Azure Function and let you know when I'll have a little be more experience with the product. – Thomas Apr 14 '16 at 0:59
  • Sounds awesome. DM me on Twitter (@crandycodes) if you have any questions. I can help you get your samples promoted on Azure.com if you'd like, as well, if you want to share them. – Chris Anderson-MSFT Apr 14 '16 at 5:17
  • Chris I've implemented a sample project that use web jobs to prove the benefit of using microservices over monolithic app. Should it be relevant to use azure function to create a sample that show how to deal with microservices and serverless azure functions ? – – Thomas Apr 14 '16 at 10:57
  • I could see that being useful. I know there is a lot of room to discuss how to transition from server to serverless application patterns. That kind of seems related to what you just described. – Chris Anderson-MSFT Apr 14 '16 at 18:27
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    Yes. The timer trigger. Cron expression of {0 */30 * * * *} azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/… – Chris Anderson-MSFT Apr 29 '16 at 18:49

Being Azure Functions based on the WebJobs SDK, they provide most of the functionality already available in WebJobs, but with some new cool capabilities.

In terms of triggers, in addition to those already available for WebJobs (e.g. Service Bus, Storage Queues, Storage Blobs, CRON schedules, WebHooks, EventHub, and File Cloud Storage providers), Azure Functions can be triggered as APIs. And HTTP calls don't require kudu credentials, but can be authenticated via Azure AD and third-party identity providers.

In regard to outputs, the only difference is that Functions can return a response when called via HTTP.

Both support a wide variety of languages, including: bash (.sh), batch (.bat / .cmd), C#, F#, Node.Js, PHP, PowerShell, and Python.

Being Functions currently in Preview, tooling is still not ideal. But Microsoft is working on it. Hopefully we get the same flexibility of developing and testing Functions locally as we currently do for WebJobs with Visual Studio.

The most significant and cool advantages brought by Functions is the alternative of having a Dynamic Service Plan with a "Serverless" model, in which we don't need to manage VM instances or scaling; it's all managed for us. Additionally, by not having dedicated instances, we only pay for the resources we actually use.

A more detailed comparison between the two here: https://blog.kloud.com.au/2016/09/14/azure-functions-or-webjobs/

HTH :)

  • Thanks for your answer Paco ! This comparison can interest a lot of persons :-) But I wasn't looking for a comparison but just trying to understand when I should go with functions rather than webjobs ! – Thomas Sep 15 '16 at 8:30
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    It's hard to have a clear cut guidance without knowing the context. That's why I believed having a comparison might be of help for people to choose :) I would say that: if (((preference == "Serverless") || (isRequired(flexibleHttpTriggers)) && (isOk(currentFunctionsTooling))) { goWithFunctions(); } else { continueWIthWebJobs(); } :) – Paco de la Cruz Sep 16 '16 at 2:34
  • Functions can return a response when called via HTTP.But Functions are based on the WebJobs SDK. Strange, isn't it? – RudyCo May 1 '17 at 14:41
  • Probably it's better to say that they were based on the WebJobs SDK, but they have evolved quite a bit from there :) – Paco de la Cruz May 2 '17 at 4:43

According to the docs Azure Functions has the following that WebJobs doesn't:

  • Automatic scaling (CPU and memory is scaled according to needs determined at runtime)
  • Pay-per-use pricing (Consumption plan instead App Service plan)
  • More trigger events (like WebHooks)
  • In-browser development (Visual Studio still possible)
  • F# support

Simply put: Azure Functions is the newer animal. If you don't already have an App Service plan I'd go with Functions because for the long-term I don't see any reasons why starting with WebJobs would be better (Functions tooling might not be already as stable though).

  • Good post, thanks ! – Thomas Dec 14 '16 at 23:58

I would like to add two more point to the above long & little bit old posts. if you choose consumption plan in azure functions, below are the limitations

If you want to run any jobs more than 10 minutes choose webjobs. Azure functions, runs only for 5 minutes by default, if your process exceeds 5 minutes, then azure function throws timeout exception. You can increase the timeout to 10 minutes in host.json.

Note: There is no timeout problem if you are using app service plan azure functions.

Another reason to distinguish is. if you use azure function, then your initial start time will be slow because the machines(containers) are created on the fly and destroyed once it is used.

  • Your first point only apply is you are using the consumption plan, with a paid sku you don't have any timeout limit. I agree with the second point. – Thomas Jan 17 at 8:22
  • i think both points are valid for consumption plan. Thanks for pointing it out – Karthikeyan VK Jan 17 at 8:26
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    Great mention of timeouts. For us this is an important factor – Niels Filter Feb 28 at 9:06
  • But you can choose appservice plan while creating azure functions. But it defeats the whole purpose though – Karthikeyan VK Feb 28 at 13:22

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