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In JavaScript, you can do something like this:

var Module = (function () {
    var functions = [method1, method2]; // array of functions to execute

    function method1 () {
        console.log('calling method1');
    }

    function method2 () {
        console.log('calling method2');
    }

    function method3 () {
        console.log('calling method3');  // not called
    }

    function add (fn) {
        functions.push(fn); // add new function to the array
    }

    function printt () {
        for (var i in functions) functions[i](); // execute functions in the array
    }

    return {
        add: add,
        printt: printt
    };
})();

Module.add(function () {
    console.log('calling anonymous function');  
});

Module.printt();

// calling method1
// calling method2
// calling anonymous function

Is it possible to do something similar within PHP where (1) methods to execute are stored in an array (2) and new functions/methods can be added to the array, so that when the printt method is run, it executes all the functions in the array?

class Module {
    protected $functions = [];

    public function __construct () {
        // ?
    }

    protected function method1 () {
        echo 'calling method1';
    }

    protected function method2 () {
        echo 'calling method2';
    }

    protected function method3 () {
        echo 'calling method3';
    }

    public function add ($fn) {
        $this->functions[] = $fn;
    }

    public function printt () {
        foreach ($this->functions as $fn)  $fn();
    }
}

$module = new Module();

$module->add(function () {
    echo 'calling anonymous function';
});

$module->printt();
2

Check is_callable() for closures and method_exists() for the object's methods.

class Module {
    protected $functions = ['method1', 'method2'];

    // ...

    public function printt () {
        foreach ($this->functions as $fn) {
            if ( is_callable( $fn ) ) {
                $fn();
            } elseif ( method_exists( $this, $fn ) ) {
                $this->$fn();
            }
        }
    }
}

There's also a difference from JS that you need to reference the method correctly - by $this within the object.

  • That's what I thought initially. "Maybe there's a different way?" Guess not. Thanks. – Mikey Apr 13 '16 at 23:35
1

Another way is add the member methods to the functions array as callables rather than just method names and then execute them with call_user_func.

class Module {
  public function __construct() {
    $this->functions = [
      [$this, 'method1'],
      [$this, 'method2'],
    ];
  }

  // ...

  public function printt() {
    foreach($this->functions as $fn) {
      call_user_func($fn);
    }
  }
}

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