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I'm working with a web application that allows designers to create pages by writing html in a combination with angularjs directives that are created by myself and other developers. I'm struggling with the best way to populate the directives with data.

Initial attempt was to keep all directives completely self contained. So a product page for example might look like the following (with custom html around all of this - left out for clarity):

<product>
    <product-information></product-information>
    <product-image></product-image>
    <product-quantities></product-quantities>
    <product-add-to-cart-button></product-add-to-cart-button>
</product>

If the directives need data (which almost all do) they would use a service to call a web API and get the data they need. There are a few issues that have arisen with this approach.

  1. The directives often need some information from a parent or sibling. In the example below, product-image likely needs the ProductID so it can get the correct image. In this case I have to rely on getting that information from a querystring parameter or store in an angularJS service that is initially populated by the parent directive.
  2. Lots of API calls. With every directive making it's own API calls I'm now ending up with pages that have 15+ API calls to load, and that can be expected to grow over time. Even though a lot of the data may be closely related (even in the same database table). Obviously this is less than ideal.

So I've started changing my approach with the second pass through. Now the directives are set up like a tree structure which each directive expecting it's data requirements to be passed in through an attribute. Here's an example:

<product-image product-url="vm.product.imageUrl" ng-if="vm.product"></product-image>

This solves the problem #2 of too many API and database calls but exposes too many internals to the designer. Now the designer has to know to pass in product-url and must understand that there is a vm.product behind the scenes. He may even need to understand some angularJS (ng-if). I've seen this pattern used a lot even in Angular2 with Inputs. Seems fine for developer usage but not for designer used directives, we want to hide the inner workings and complexity while giving the designer the power of controlling the layout.

Finally, I'm considering using the parent controller to populate everything that might be needed on the page. Then all the child directives will just use a service like they are now but instead of calling an API, the data is already loaded. The directives remain simple and mostly self-contained, but their data load is triggered by a parent. The only issue I have with this is that we may end up loading a lot of data that is unused because of directives not being used by the designer. But I feel like this is a necessary trade off.

Has anyone built something similar, are there any possible approaches I am missing?

  • I see no problem with a service that acts as a model and handles all the APIs. What is the problem with this approach? The question is too vague in its current state. – Estus Flask Apr 14 '16 at 14:27
  • I added more markup to the product page example. So would you have the product controller load all data in a service/model and the children just use that? – Ryan Langton Apr 14 '16 at 15:07
  • I would make a service totally promise-based, much more flexible and consistent. $http promises are cached within the service on the first requests, returned on the next requests, revalidated if needed. Wrapping a service with state/route resolver may be beneficial because a resolver injects promise value, no need to unwrap a promise manually. – Estus Flask Apr 14 '16 at 15:42
0

You can use a component tree with your service. Starting with a designer friendly:

<div ng-app="MyApp">
  <product id="1">
    <product-image></product-image>
  </product>
</div>

Something like this sorta works:

angular.module('MyApp', [])

.factory('api', function($q){
  return {
    loadProduct: function(id){
      return $q.when({
        id: id,
    imageUrl: 'http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160407085910-setsuna-main-overlay-tease.jpg'
  })
    }
  };  
})
.component('product', {
  transclude: true,
  bindings: {
    id: '=' 
  },
  template: [
    '<div ng-transclude></div>'
  ].join(''),
  controller: function(api) {
    var self = this;
    this.$onInit = function() {
      self.data = api.loadProduct(this.id);
    };
  }
})
.component('productImage', {
  require: {
    product: '^product'
  },  
  bindings: {
  },
  template: [
    '<pre>{{ $ctrl.url | json }}</pre>'
  ].join(''),
  controller: function() {
    var self = this;
    this.url = false;
    this.$onInit = function() {
      this.product.data.then(function(data){
        self.url = data.imageUrl;
      })
    };
  }
})

See this CodePen: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/wGmEKP?editors=1011

  • I like this solution, the issue I see however is that you lose 2 way binding with the parent product data. So for example say you update data in <product-quantities> and then submit the product data within the <product-submit>, any changes you made within <product-quantities> only exist within that directive. – Ryan Langton Apr 18 '16 at 14:13
  • Not necessarily... There are ways to keep those scopes linked... (Accepted answer? Do you want me to investigate further?) – malix Apr 18 '16 at 16:41

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