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This question might be too similar to this question I asked a few hours ago, but the issue I was struggling with is actually more complex than I initially thought. I was not aware of the fact that no two objects can be considered to be same in JavaScript even when the two objects have the same set of properties and values.

I have two arrays of objects like this in JavaScript.

var from = [
    {city: "seoul", country: "korea"},
    {city: "tokyo", country: "japan"},
    {city: "beijing", country: "china"},
    {city: "new york", country: "usa"}
];
var to = [
    {city: "seoul", country: "korea"},
    {city: "tokyo", country: "japan"},
    {city: "toronto", country: "canada"}
];

What I want to do is to check if any of the objects in the "from" array is already in the "to" array and push the object to the "to" array only when it is not in the "to" array, and I want to add only one object from the "from" array to the "to" array even if there are other objects in the "from" array that are not in "to" array. In other words, I want to break out of a loop as soon as an object is pushed to the "to" array.

In the end, I want the "to" array to look like this.

var target = {
    {city: "seoul", country: "korea"},
    {city: "tokyo", country: "japan"},
    {city: "toronto", country: "canada"},
    {city: "beijing", country: "china"}
};

Here is a function that I came up with to achieve this effect.

function ruthere (source, target) {
    for (var i = 0; i < target.length; i++) {
        for (var j = 0; j < source.length; j++) {
            if (target[i].city == source[j].city) {
                console.log("Already there");
            } else {
                target.push(source[j]);
                i = target.length-1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

This is as far as I've gotten to achieve the result I wanted, but this still does not do what I want.

*edit: I only need to check if the value of the name property of an object is the same. The value of country property does not have to be the same.

  • (target[i].name your sample objects do not have a "name" property. You probably want this to read (target[i].city – Hamms Apr 14 '16 at 23:39
  • @Hamms Sorry. It was a typo. – oosniss Apr 14 '16 at 23:40
  • 1
    also note that break will only break out of the innermost for loop, not the both. You probably want to return. – Hamms Apr 14 '16 at 23:43
2

A few things wrong with your code: you do need a nested loop, but not for why you're doing it here. If the cities in the target array aren't exactly the same as those in the source array, then some may never get pushed to the target array. Cities can also have the same name but be in different countries.

Assuming you can use ES5 features:

function ruthere(source, target) {
    for (var i = 0; i < source.length; i++) {
        var srcObj = source[i];
        var tarObj = target.find(function (obj) {
            return obj.city === srcObj.city && obj.country === srcObj.country;
        });

        if (!tarObj) {
            target.push(srcObj);
            break;
        }
    }

    return target;
}

Edit: I'm mistaken, Array.prototype.find is ES6, not ES5. Here's the ES3 version:

function ruthere(source, target) {
    for (var i = 0; i < source.length; i++) {
        var srcObj = source[i];
        var tarObj;
        for (var j = 0; j < target.length; j++) {
            var obj = target[j];
            if (srcObj.city === obj.city && srcObj.country === obj.country) {
                tarObj = obj;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (!tarObj) {
            target.push(srcObj);
            break;
        }
    }

    return target;
}
  • 1
    Isn't .find an ES6 (not ES5) array method? – litel Apr 15 '16 at 0:04
  • find isn't supported currently in IE or Opera – 4castle Apr 15 '16 at 0:08
  • @kpimov This worked. Thanks for your answer. – oosniss Apr 15 '16 at 0:09
  • My bad. I added a version that doesn't use Array.prototype.find to the answer – kpimov Apr 15 '16 at 1:02
1

Just use;

var from = [{
    city: "seoul",
    country: "korea"
}, {
    city: "tokyo",
    country: "japan"
}, {
    city: "beijing",
    country: "china"
}, {
    city: "new york",
    country: "usa"
}];
var to = [{
    city: "seoul",
    country: "korea"
}, {
    city: "tokyo",
    country: "japan"
}, {
    city: "toronto",
    country: "canada"
}];

function ruthere(source, target) {
    for (var i = 0; i < source.length; i++) {
        if (source[i].city !== target[i].city) {
            target.push(source[i])
        }
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < target.length; i++) {
		$(".city").append((i + 1) + " " + target[i].city + "<br>")
    }
}
ruthere(from, to)
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="city"></div>

  • Code–only answers aren't helpful. You should explain the OP's issue (which isn't clear in the question) and how your answer fixes it. Otherwise you're just a free coding service. – RobG Apr 15 '16 at 3:15
-2

I would look into using underscore to help you achieve this: Underscore.js

This answer will probably be a very helpful answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/28632359/5768113

  • No part of this answer actually answers the question. It's just a link to the answer. – 4castle Apr 14 '16 at 23:52
  • My mistake, I thought he wanted to iterate through one object and check if it was present in another object. I may of been mistaken in thinking the answer I provide wasn't helpful. My bad. – Deacan Apr 14 '16 at 23:59
  • It's not that, those are helpful links. But on StackOverflow you can't just post an answer of links. You have to include what the link says and how you can use it to answer the OP's question. – 4castle Apr 15 '16 at 0:03
  • I see, my apologies. Sorry, I will try adhere to this in the future. Thank you for clearing it up for me. – Deacan Apr 15 '16 at 0:08

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