35

I need to translate the address:

www.example.com/TEST in ---> www.example.com/test

8 Answers 8

23

Yes, you are going to need perl.

If you are using Ubuntu, instead of apt-get install nginx-full, use apt-get install nginx-extras, which will have the embedded perl module.

Then, in your configuration file:

  http {
  ...
    # Include the perl module
    perl_modules perl/lib;
    ...
    # Define this function
    perl_set $uri_lowercase 'sub {
      my $r = shift;
      my $uri = $r->uri;
      $uri = lc($uri);
      return $uri;
    }';
    ...
    server {
    ...
      # As your first location entry, tell nginx to rewrite your uri,
      # if the path contains uppercase characters
      location ~ [A-Z] {
        rewrite ^(.*)$ $scheme://$host$uri_lowercase;
      }
    ...
5
  • 1
    Works well, although my query params do get stripped.
    – Jonathan
    Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 15:02
  • This worked for me. On ubuntu I needed to apt-get install nginx-extras. And the location ~ [A-Z] {... code I put inside a specific nginx conf file (for servers that have multiple sites on them) Commented Nov 22, 2018 at 19:34
  • 1
    Also made a gist for anyone who actually uses those. gist.github.com/KalobTaulien/eb5851ee42343aac614ab6e6cfe90245 It's basically the same code, but the way I explained in the comment above — a little more newbie friendly Commented Nov 22, 2018 at 19:43
  • 1
    This is brilliant, I was looking for something else and this fits perfectly. Kudos to you sir!
    – Travis D
    Commented Feb 9, 2021 at 15:02
  • 1
    nginx-extras on ubuntu 22.04 does not have perl
    – jjxtra
    Commented Jun 16, 2023 at 23:40
10
location /dupa/ {
    set_by_lua $request_uri_low "return ngx.arg[1]:lower()" $request_uri;
    rewrite ^ https://$host$request_uri_low;
}
3
  • 1
    you might want to use a 301 instead of 302 for SEO purposes like: rewrite ^ https://$host$request_uri_low permanent; Commented Jan 1, 2021 at 13:37
  • ...and return: return 301 $request_url_low.
    – x-yuri
    Commented Jan 11, 2021 at 22:20
  • Nginx config failes to reload, how to instal lua support?
    – jjxtra
    Commented Jun 16, 2023 at 23:26
9

i managed to achieve the goal using embedded perl:

location ~ [A-Z] {
  perl 'sub { my $r = shift; $r->internal_redirect(lc($r->uri)); }';
}
2
  • It may solve the posted issue, but "ignoring case" AND "lowering case" are two completely different things.
    – alejandrob
    Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 21:55
  • This way compatible if you want to not rewrite address and answer true page with any case in address field. Thaks for additional way to resolve the issue.
    – PRIHLOP
    Commented Feb 12, 2021 at 13:28
4

Based on Adam's answer, I ended up using lua, as it's available on my server.

set_by_lua $request_uri_low "return ngx.arg[1]:lower()" $request_uri;
if ($request_uri_low != $request_uri) {
   set $redirect_to_lower 1;
}
if (!-f $request_uri) {
    set $redirect_to_lower "${redirect_to_lower}1";
}
if ($redirect_to_lower = 11) {
    rewrite . https://$host$request_uri_low permanent;
}
2
  • 2
    Be careful with this answer. If is evil: nginx.com/resources/wiki/start/topics/depth/ifisevil
    – MacroMan
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 11:14
  • @MacroMan It can be unsafe only if used in the location context and depends on what is following this configuration fragment. For the most cases this one should be completely safe. Commented Nov 7, 2020 at 17:58
3
location ~*^/test/ {
  return 301 http://www.example.com/test;
}

A location can either be defined by a prefix string, or by a regular expression. Regular expressions are specified with the preceding “~*” modifier (for case-insensitive matching), or the “~” modifier (for case-sensitive matching).

Soruce: http://nginx.org/en/docs/http/ngx_http_core_module.html#location

1

I would like to point out that most of Perl answers are vulnerable to CRLF injection.

You should never use nginx's $uri variable in a HTTP redirection. $uri variable is subject to normalization (more info), including:

  • URL encoded characters are decoded
  • Removal of the ? and query string
  • Consecutive / characters are replace by a single /

URL decoding is the reason of CRLF injection vulnerability. The following example url would add a malicious header into your redirect, if you used $uri variable in the redirection.

https://example.org/%0ASet-Cookie:MaliciousHeader:Injected

%0A is decoded to \n\r and nginx will add into headers the following lines:

Location: https://example.org
set-cookie: maliciousheader:injected

The secure Perl redirection requires to replace all newline characters.

perl_set $uri_lowercase 'sub {
    my $r = shift;
    my $uri = $r->uri;
    $uri =~ s/\R//; # replace all newline characters
    $uri = lc($uri);
    return $uri;
}';
0

Redirect with LUA module.

load_module /usr/lib/nginx/modules/ndk_http_module.so;
load_module /usr/lib/nginx/modules/ngx_http_lua_module.so;

set_by_lua $uri_lowercase "return string.lower(ngx.var.uri)";
location ~[A-Z] {
  return 301 $scheme://$http_host$uri_lowercase$is_args$args;
}
0

I've seen this code all over the internet, and it does work. However, it uses the host name that the nginx server receives. In the case of a Kubernetes infrastructure, this may not be the same as what the client uses so the redirect will not only fail but give away private information about the cluster naming scheme.

This code works for me and is slightly faster because it uses internal redirection

sub {
    my $r = shift;
    my $uri = $r->uri;
    $uri =~ s/\R//; # replace all newline characters
    $uri = lc($uri);
    $r -> internal_redirect($uri)
}

It might be used in an nginx configuration file like this:

user        nginx; # Not important for this answer, use any user you want
                   # but nginx is a sensible default.

# Load the Perl module
load_module /usr/lib/nginx/modules/ngx_http_perl_module.so;

...

http {
    server {
        # Given any location that contains an upper-case letter
        location ~ [A-Z] {
            # Lowercase it and redirect internally
            perl 'sub {
                my $r = shift;
                my $uri = $r->uri;
                $uri =~ s/\R//; # replace all newline characters
                $uri = lc($uri);
                $r -> internal_redirect($uri)
            }';
        }

        # This can be any set of rules, below is a simple one that hosts
        # static content. It will receive the lower-cased location and
        # serve it.
        location / {
            root  /usr/share/nginx/html;
            index index.html;
        }
    }
}

My Dockerfile starts with this line and doesn't require additional packages:

FROM nginx:1.23.4-perl

In this example you will want to copy your static site to /usr/share/nginx/html for example:

COPY nginx.conf /etc/nginx/nginx.conf
COPY src/ /usr/share/nginx/html

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