I'm running lint with my React app, and I receive this error:

error    JSX props should not use arrow functions        react/jsx-no-bind

And this is where I'm running the arrow function (inside onClick):

{this.state.photos.map(tile => (
  <span key={tile.img}>
    <Checkbox
      defaultChecked={tile.checked}
      onCheck={() => this.selectPicture(tile)}
      style={{position: 'absolute', zIndex: 99, padding: 5, backgroundColor: 'rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.72)'}}
    />
    <GridTile
      title={tile.title}
      subtitle={<span>by <b>{tile.author}</b></span>}
      actionIcon={<IconButton onClick={() => this.handleDelete(tile)}><Delete color="white"/></IconButton>}
    >
      <img onClick={() => this.handleOpen(tile.img)} src={tile.img} style={{cursor: 'pointer'}}/>
    </GridTile>
  </span>
))}

Is this a bad practice that should be avoided? And what's the best way to do it?

up vote 111 down vote accepted

Why you shouldn't use inline arrow functions in JSX props

Using arrow functions or binding in JSX is a bad practice that hurts performance, because the function is recreated on each render.

  1. Whenever a function is created, the previous function is garbage collected. Rerendering many elements might create jank in animations.

  2. Using an inline arrow function will cause PureComponents, and components that use shallowCompare in the shouldComponentUpdate method to rerender anyway. Since the arrow function prop is recreated each time, the shallow compare will identify it as a change to a prop, and the component will rerender.

As you can see in the following 2 examples - when we use inline arrow function, the <Button> component is rerendered each time (the console shows the 'render button' text).

Example 1 - PureComponent without inline handler

class Button extends React.PureComponent {
  render() {
    const { onClick } = this.props;
    
    console.log('render button');
    
    return (
      <button onClick={ onClick }>Click</button>
    );
  }
}

class Parent extends React.Component {
  state = {
    counter: 0
  }
  
  onClick = () => this.setState((prevState) => ({
    counter: prevState.counter + 1
  }));
  
  render() {
    const { counter } = this.state;
    
    return (
      <div>
        <Button onClick={ this.onClick } />
        <div>{ counter }</div>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <Parent />,
  document.getElementById('root')
);
<script crossorigin src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script crossorigin src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>
<div id="root"></div>

Example 2 - PureComponent with inline handler

class Button extends React.PureComponent {
  render() {
    const { onClick } = this.props;
    
    console.log('render button');
    
    return (
      <button onClick={ onClick }>Click</button>
    );
  }
}

class Parent extends React.Component {
  state = {
    counter: 0
  }
  
  render() {
    const { counter } = this.state;
    
    return (
      <div>
        <Button onClick={ () => this.setState((prevState) => ({
          counter: prevState.counter + 1
        })) } />
        <div>{ counter }</div>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <Parent />,
  document.getElementById('root')
);
<script crossorigin src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script crossorigin src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>
<div id="root"></div>

Binding methods to this without inlining arrow functions

  1. Binding the method manually in the constructor:

    class Button extends React.Component {
      constructor(props, context) {
        super(props, context);
    
        this.cb = this.cb.bind(this);
      }
    
      cb() {
    
      }
    
      render() {
        return (
          <button onClick={ this.cb }>Click</button>
        );
      }
    }
    
  2. Binding a method using the proposal-class-fields with an arrow function. As this is a stage 3 proposal, you'll need to add the Stage 3 preset or the Class properties transform to your babel configuration.

    class Button extends React.Component {
      cb = () => { // the class property is initialized with an arrow function that binds this to the class
    
      }
    
      render() {
        return (
          <button onClick={ this.cb }>Click</button>
        );
      }
    }
    
  • 3
    How do you achieve this on stateless components? – lux Apr 17 '16 at 15:04
  • 4
    Stateless (function) components don't have this, so there's nothing to bind. Usually the methods are supplied by a wrapper smart component. – Ori Drori Apr 17 '16 at 15:06
  • 24
    @OriDrori: How does that work when you need to pass data in the callback? onClick={() => { onTodoClick(todo.id) } – adam-beck May 12 '16 at 20:14
  • 3
    @adam-beck - add it inside the callback method definition in the class cb() { onTodoClick(this.props.todo.id); }. – Ori Drori May 12 '16 at 22:54
  • 1
    This is the lowest level I have and it's just a stateless component. Is this what you meant? gist.github.com/adam-beck/686bd0e4f495abcbbdcd0fab41f68eb6 – adam-beck May 12 '16 at 23:35

This is because an arrow function apparently will create a new instance of the function on each render if used in a JSX property. This might create a huge strain on the garbage collector and will also hinder the browser from optimizing any "hot paths" since functions will be thrown away instead of reused.

You can see the whole explanation and some more info at https://github.com/yannickcr/eslint-plugin-react/blob/master/docs/rules/jsx-no-bind.md

  • Not only that. Creating the new function instances each time means the state is modified and when a component's state is modified it will be re-rendered. Since one of the main reasons to use React is to only render elements that change, using bind or arrow functions here is shooting yourself in the foot. It is not well documented though, especially in the case of working with mapping arrays within Lists, etc. – hippietrail Sep 23 '17 at 2:07
  • "Creating the new function instances each time means the state is modified" what do you mean by that? There's no state in at all in the question – apieceofbart Jun 4 at 11:30

To avoid creating new functions with the same arguments, you could memoize the function bind result, here is a simple utility named memobind to do it: https://github.com/supnate/memobind

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