159

I have the following React component:

export default class MyComponent extends React.Component {

    onSubmit(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        var title = this.title;
        console.log(title);
    }

    render(){
        return (
            ...
            <form className="form-horizontal">
                ...
                <input type="text" className="form-control" ref={(c) => this.title = c} name="title" />
                ...
            </form>
            ...
            <button type="button" onClick={this.onSubmit} className="btn">Save</button>
            ...
        );
    }

};

The console is giving me undefined - any ideas what's wrong with this code?

  • 6
    this.onSubmit.bind(this); – zerkms Apr 18 '16 at 0:38
  • Nice - want to add it as answer and I'll tick it off (?) – JoeTidee Apr 18 '16 at 0:47
  • 2
    what about e.target.value without the bind? – JordanHendrix Apr 18 '16 at 3:11
  • 1
    wouldn't e.target.value be targetting the button, not the input field? – JoeTidee Apr 18 '16 at 10:40
  • You need to bind the onSubmit method to the submit button (DOM element) when clicked (i.e. onClick={this.onSubmit.bind(this)}). And if you'd like to access the value of the title input in the form you can use onSubmit(event) { const title = event.target.elements.title.value; }. – tfmontague Aug 29 '17 at 11:48
1

You should use constructor under the class MyComponent extends React.Component

constructor(props){
    super(props);
    this.onSubmit = this.onSubmit.bind(this);
  }

Then you will get the result of title

246

There are three answers here, depending on the version of React you're (forced to) work(ing) with, and whether you want to use hooks.

First things first:

It's important to understand how React works, so you can do things properly (protip: it's is super worth running through the React tutorial exercise on the React website. It's well written, and covers all the basics in a way that actually explains how to do things). "Properly" here means that you're writing an application interface that happens to be rendered in a browser; all the interface work happens in React, not in "what you're used to if you're writing a web page" (this is why React apps are "apps", not "web pages").

React applications are rendered based off of two things:

  1. the component's properties as declared by whichever parent creates an instance of that component, which the parent can modify throughout its lifecycle, and
  2. the component's own internal state, which it can modify itself throughout its own lifecycle.

What you're expressly not doing when you use React is generating HTML elements and then using those: when you tell React to use an <input>, for instance, you are not creating an HTML input element, you are telling React to create a React input object that happens to render as an HTML input element, and whose event handling looks at, but is not controlled by, the HTML element's input events.

When using React, what you're doing is generating application UI elements that present the user with (often manipulable) data, with user interaction changing the Component's state, which may cause a rerender of part of your application interface to reflect the new state. In this model, the state is always the final authority, not "whatever UI library is used to render it", which on the web is the browser's DOM. The DOM is almost an afterthought in this programming model: it's just the particular UI framework that React happens to be using.

So in the case of an input element, the logic is:

  1. You type in the input element,
  2. nothing happens to your input element yet, the event got intercepted by React and killed off immediately,
  3. React forwards the event to the function you've set up for event handling,
  4. that function may schedule a state update,
  5. if it does, React runs that state update (asynchronously!) and will trigger a render call after the update, but only if the state update changed the state.
  6. only after this render has taken place will the UI show that you "typed a letter".

All of that happens in a matter of milliseconds, if not less, so it looks like you typed into the input element in the same way you're used to from "just using an input element on a page", but that's absolutely not what happened.

So, with that said, on to how to get values from elements in React:

React 15 and below, with ES5

To do things properly, your component has a state value, which is shown via an input field, and we can update it by making that UI element send change events back into the component:

var Component = React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function() {
    return {
      inputValue: ''
    };
  },

  render: function() {
    return (
      //...
      <input value={this.state.inputValue} onChange={this.updateInputValue}/>
      //...
    );
  },

  updateInputValue: function(evt) {
    this.setState({
      inputValue: evt.target.value
    });
  }
});

So we tell React to use the updateInputValue function to handle the user interaction, use setState to schedule the state update, and the fact that render taps into this.state.inputValue means that when it rerenders after updating the state, the user will see the update text based on what they typed.

addendum based on comments

Given that UI inputs represent state values (consider what happens if a user closes their tab midway, and the tab is restored. Should all those values they filled in be restored? If so, that's state). That might make you feel like a large form needs tens or even a hundred input forms, but React is about modeling your UI in a maintainable way: you do not have 100 independent input fields, you have groups of related inputs, so you capture each group in a component and then build up your "master" form as a collection of groups.

MyForm:
  render:
    <PersonalData/>
    <AppPreferences/>
    <ThirdParty/>
     ...

This is also much easier to maintain than a giant single form component. Split up groups into Components with state maintenance, where each component is only responsible for tracking a few input fields at a time.

You may also feel like it's "a hassle" to write out all that code, but that's a false saving: developers-who-are-not-you, including future you, actually benefit greatly from seeing all those inputs hooked up explicitly, because it makes code paths much easier to trace. However, you can always optimize. For instance, you can write a state linker

MyComponent = React.createClass({
  getInitialState() {
    return {
      firstName: this.props.firstName || "",
      lastName: this.props.lastName || "" 
      ...: ...
      ...
    }
  },
  componentWillMount() {
    Object.keys(this.state).forEach(n => {
      let fn = n + 'Changed';
      this[fn] = evt => {
        let update = {};
        update[n] = evt.target.value;
        this.setState(update);
      });
    });
  },
  render: function() {
    return Object.keys(this.state).map(n => {
      <input
        key={n} 
        type="text"
        value={this.state[n]}
        onChange={this[n + 'Changed']}/>
    });
  }
});

Of course, there are improved versions of this, so hit up https://npmjs.com and search for a React state linking solution that you like best. Open Source is mostly about finding what others have already done, and using that instead of writing everything yourself from scratch.

React 16 (and 15.5 transitional) and 'modern' JS

As of React 16 (and soft-starting with 15.5) the createClass call is no longer supported, and class syntax needs to be used. This changes two things: the obvious class syntax, but also the thiscontext binding that createClass can do "for free", so to ensure things still work make sure you're using "fat arrow" notation for this context preserving anonymous functions in onWhatever handlers, such as the onChange we use in the code here:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      inputValue: ''
    };
  }

  render() {
    return (
      //...
      <input value={this.state.inputValue} onChange={evt => this.updateInputValue(evt)}/>
      //...
    );
  },

  updateInputValue(evt) {
    this.setState({
      inputValue: evt.target.value
    });
  }
});

You may also have seen people use bind in their constructor for all their event handling functions, like this:

constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  this.handler = this.handler.bind(this);
  ...
}

render() {
  return (
    ...
    <element onclick={this.handler}/>
    ...
  );
}

Don't do that.

Almost any time you're using bind, the proverbial "you're doing it wrong" applies. Your class already defines the prototype, and so as programming model already defines the instance context. Don't put bind of top of that an use normal event forwarding instead of duplicating all your function calls in the constructor. Now you've increased your bug surface, and made it much harder to trace errors because the problem might be in your constructor instead of where you call your code. In addition of placing a burden of maintenance on others you (have or choose) to work with.

Yes, I know the react docs say it's fine. It's not, don't do it.

React 16.8, using function components with hooks

As of React 16.8 the function component (i.e. literally just a function that takes some props as argument can be used as if it's an instance of a component class, without ever writing a class) can also be given state, through the use of hooks.

If you don't need full class code, and a single instance function will do, then you can now use the useState hook to get yourself a single state variable, and its update function, which works roughly the same as the above examples, except without the setState function call:

import { useState } from 'react';

function myFunctionalComponentFunction() {
  const [input, setInput] = useState(''); // '' is the initial state value
  return (
    <div>
    <label>Please specify:</label>
    <input value={input} onInput={e => setInput(e.target.value)}/>
    </div>
  );
}

Previously the unofficial distinction between classes and function components was "function components don't have state", so we can't hide behind that one anymore: the difference between function components and classes components can be found spread over several pages in the very well-written react documentation (no shortcut one liner explanation to conveniently misinterpret for you!) which you should read so that you know what you're doing and can thus know whether you picked the best (whatever that means for you) solution to program yourself out of a problem you're having.

  • 4
    I've read a few online articles which say that using too much state is a bad idea. In one particular form of my application I have about 100 form fields. Defining a function to save the state feels like an unnecessarily arduous way of doing things. If I can use onClick={this.onSubmit.bind(this)}, this seems like a good way to get the value (then if I want, set the components state) - I would appreciate some comments on this. – JoeTidee Apr 18 '16 at 1:10
  • 5
    so write smarter code. form inputs are most definitely state (consider what happens if a user closes their tab midway, and the tab is restored. Should all those values they filled in be restored? yes? that's state), so write a bit of state maintenance code. Facebook has hundreds of form values, too, and their solution to the madness was React. It works really well. One way to make your code a little easier, while still using state, is to use two way state linking, again, explained on the React site. Worth reading! =) – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Apr 18 '16 at 1:13
  • 2
    Also note that "100 fields" is mostly irrelevant: split up your form, because it's not 100 elements, it's several sections, each with a number of inputs, so apply good design and make each section its own component, with grouping components for form groups. This typically makes a component responsible for less than 10 inputs, and suddenly your information architecture makes a lot more sense. The form submit, as a browser action, of course just sees "your form" and submits everything in one go. Clean, targetted UI design. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Apr 18 '16 at 1:53
  • 2
    Thanks for the comments. I did however notice that state linking has been deprecated as of React v15. – JoeTidee Apr 18 '16 at 10:43
  • 3
    @JasonChing then you've simply built potential bugs into your code. React is not a "be all, end all" solution to web pages, it's a framework for building interfaces, and it is responsible for state management and actual UI rendering as afterthought (your users don't interact with the DOM, they interact with React. The DOM updates are simply an asynchronous (but incredibly fast) last step so that the UI visually reflect the state). If you want to bypass that, the more important question is: why are you using React? Because the best sign you're using it wrong is combining React and jQuery. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans May 14 '17 at 16:43
14

Managed to get the input field value by doing something like this:

import React, { Component } from 'react';

class App extends Component {

constructor(props){
super(props);

this.state = {
  username : ''
}

this.updateInput = this.updateInput.bind(this);
this.handleSubmit = this.handleSubmit.bind(this);
}


updateInput(event){
this.setState({username : event.target.value})
}


handleSubmit(){
console.log('Your input value is: ' + this.state.username)
//Send state to the server code
}



render(){
return (
    <div>
    <input type="text" onChange={this.updateInput}></input>
    <input type="submit" onClick={this.handleSubmit} ></input>
    </div>
  );
}
} 

//output
//Your input value is: x
  • Why using "setState"? This involves a re-rendering..isn't it? – Luca Davanzo Sep 3 at 14:34
9

In react 16, I use

<Input id="number" 
       type="time" 
       onChange={(evt) => { console.log(evt.target.value); }} />
  • doesn't work if the field was populated automatically on age load – SeanMC Mar 10 at 2:48
4

I succeeded in doing this by binding the "this" to the function updateInputValue(evt) with

this.updateInputValue = this.updateInputValue.bind(this);

However input value={this.state.inputValue} ... turned out to be no good idea.

Here's the full code in babel ES6 :

class InputField extends React.Component{


  constructor(props){
   super(props);
   //this.state={inputfield: "no value"};   
   this.handleClick = this.handleClick.bind(this);
   this.updateInputValue = this.updateInputValue.bind(this);
  }

  handleClick(){
   console.log("trying to add picture url");
   console.log("value of input field : "+this.state.inputfield);

  }

  updateInputValue(evt){
    //console.log("input field updated with "+evt.target.value);
    this.state={inputfield: evt.target.value};   

  }

  render(){
    var r; 
    r=<div><input type="text" id="addpixinputfield" 
            onChange={this.updateInputValue} />
      <input type="button" value="add" id="addpix" onClick={this.handleClick}/>
      </div>;    
    return r;
   }
}
2

your error is because of you use class and when use class we need to bind the functions with This in order to work well. anyway there are a lot of tutorial why we should "this" and what is "this" do in javascript.

if you correct your submit button it should be work:

<button type="button" onClick={this.onSubmit.bind(this)} className="btn">Save</button>

and also if you want to show value of that input in console you should use var title = this.title.value;

0

You can get an input value without adding 'onChange' function.

Just add to the input element a 'ref attr:

And then use this.refs to get the input value when you need it.

  • 3
    This is not recommended anymore. – JoeTidee Aug 24 '17 at 7:24
  • 1
    You can use them, but it's recommended to keep the data flow in one direction using props and callbacks. – JoeTidee Aug 29 '17 at 7:26
  • It would be good to add an example of adding refs correctly, I.e. Using a ref callback instead of a legacy string. – JoeTidee Aug 29 '17 at 7:28
0
// On the state
constructor() {
  this.state = {
   email: ''
 }
}

// Input view ( always check if property is available in state {this.state.email ? this.state.email : ''}

<Input 
  value={this.state.email ? this.state.email : ''} 
  onChange={event => this.setState({ email: event.target.value)}
  type="text" 
  name="emailAddress" 
  placeholder="johdoe@somewhere.com" />

  • while your answer could be good for the question it's always better to add some explanation. Please take 2 minutes to add it. This will improve your answer also for future users. – DaFois Oct 6 at 12:32
  • sure, I will do that. – Kidali Kevin Oct 6 at 13:38
0

Change your ref into: ref='title' and delete name='title' Then delete var title = this.title and write:

console.log(this.refs.title.value)

Also you should add .bind(this) to this.onSubmit

(It worked in my case which was quite similar, but instead of onClick I had onSubmit={...} and it was put in form ( <form onSubmit={...} ></form>))

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