30

I have a data set with repeating rows. I want to remove consecutive repeated and count them but only if they're consecutive. I'm looking for an efficient way to do this. Can't think of how in dplyr or data.table.

MWE

dat <- data.frame(
    x = c(6, 2, 3, 3, 3, 1, 1, 6, 5, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4),
    y = c(7, 5, 7, 7, 7, 5, 5, 7, 1, 2, 7, 7, 1, 7),
    z = c(rep(LETTERS[1:2], each=7))
)

##        x     y     z
## 1      6     7     A
## 2      2     5     A
## 3      3     7     A
## 4      3     7     A
## 5      3     7     A
## 6      1     5     A
## 7      1     5     A
## 8      6     7     B
## 9      5     1     B
## 10     5     2     B
## 11     6     7     B
## 12     6     7     B
## 13     5     1     B
## 14     4     7     B

Desired output

       x     y     z   n
1      6     7     A   1
2      2     5     A   1
3      3     7     A   3
4      1     5     A   2
5      6     7     B   1
6      5     1     B   1
7      5     2     B   1
8      6     7     B   2
9      5     1     B   1 
10     4     7     B   1
26

With data.table:

library(data.table)
setDT(dat)

dat[, c(.SD[1L], .N), by=.(g = rleidv(dat))][, g := NULL]

    x y z N
 1: 6 7 A 1
 2: 2 5 A 1
 3: 3 7 A 3
 4: 1 5 A 2
 5: 6 7 B 1
 6: 5 1 B 1
 7: 5 2 B 1
 8: 6 7 B 2
 9: 5 1 B 1
10: 4 7 B 1
  • 1
    Well played. There are some handy tools in data.table I need to dive into deeper. – Tyler Rinker Apr 18 '16 at 1:32
  • 1
    Something like this could be could for large data.tables: dat[, g := rleidv(dat)][, N := .N, keyby = g][J(unique(g)), mult = "first"][, g := NULL][] – Jota Apr 18 '16 at 2:45
  • @Jota Yeah, that's what I'd do in practice; just went with this way because it's shorter / more direct. By the way, you don't need the .() wrapper if there's just one column. – Frank Apr 18 '16 at 2:48
  • So many great solutions. but this was first and indeed fast. – Tyler Rinker Apr 18 '16 at 13:09
  • 2
    @Tyler .() is an alias for list() so that would give list(.N, .SD), but .SD is already a list and we want the result to be a one-level list (instead of nested). I think there might be a feature request for .(col, .SD) and I've certainly typed it mistakenly many times. – Frank Apr 18 '16 at 15:20
15

Similar to Ricky's answer, here's another base solution:

with(rle(do.call(paste, dat)), cbind(dat[ cumsum(lengths), ], lengths))

In case paste doesn't cut it for the column classes you have, you can do

ud     = unique(dat)
ud$r   = seq_len(nrow(ud))
dat$r0 = seq_len(nrow(dat))
newdat = merge(dat, ud)

with(rle(newdat[order(newdat$r0), ]$r), cbind(dat[cumsum(lengths), ], lengths))

... though I'm guessing there's some better way.

  • 8
    In case paste doesn't cut it I see what you did there. – ta.speot.is Apr 18 '16 at 4:20
11

With dplyr, you can borrow data.table::rleid to make a run ID column, then use n to count rows and unique to chop out repeats:

dat %>% group_by(run = data.table::rleid(x, y, z)) %>%  mutate(n = n()) %>% 
    distinct() %>% ungroup() %>% select(-run)

You can replace rleid with just base R, if you like, but it's not as pretty:

dat %>% group_by(run = rep(seq_along(rle(paste(x, y, z))$len), 
                           times = rle(paste(x, y, z))$len)) %>%  
    mutate(n = n()) %>% distinct() %>% ungroup() %>% select(-run)

Either way, you get:

Source: local data frame [10 x 4]

       x     y      z     n
   (dbl) (dbl) (fctr) (int)
1      6     7      A     1
2      2     5      A     1
3      3     7      A     3
4      1     5      A     2
5      6     7      B     1
6      5     1      B     1
7      5     2      B     1
8      6     7      B     2
9      5     1      B     1
10     4     7      B     1

Edit

Per @Frank's comment, you can also use summarise to insert n and collapse instead of mutate and unique if you group_by all the variables you want to keep before run, as summarise collapses the last group. One advantage to this approach is that you don't have to ungroup to get rid of run, as summarise does for you:

dat %>% group_by(x, y, z, run = data.table::rleid(x, y, z)) %>% 
    summarise(n = n()) %>% select(-run)
  • Isn't mutate(n()) %>% distinct the same as summarise(n())? – Frank Apr 18 '16 at 2:37
  • 1
    @Frank Not quite; summarise(n()) would just leave you with a single column unless you had grouped by or included everything else: summarise(x = unique(x), y = unique(y), z = unique(y), n = n()) would be equivalent. – alistaire Apr 18 '16 at 2:45
10

A base solution below

idx <- rle(with(dat, paste(x, y, z)))
d <- cbind(do.call(rbind, strsplit(idx$values, " ")), idx$lengths)
as.data.frame(d)  

   V1 V2 V3 V4
1   6  7  A  1
2   2  5  A  1
3   3  7  A  3
4   1  5  A  2
5   6  7  B  1
6   5  1  B  1
7   5  2  B  1
8   6  7  B  2
9   5  1  B  1
10  4  7  B  1
  • 2
    Or with(rle(do.call(paste, dat)), cbind(dat[ cumsum(lengths), ], lengths)). Also strsplit will give you strings or factors, while you probably want numbers in some cols. – Frank Apr 18 '16 at 1:49
  • 2
    That's brilliant Frank, I'd vote for that if you put it as an answer. – Ricky Apr 18 '16 at 1:52
7

If you have a large dataset, you could use a similar idea to Frank's data.table solution, but avoid using .SD like this:

dat[, g := rleidv(dat)][, N := .N, keyby = g
   ][J(unique(g)), mult = "first"
   ][, g := NULL
   ][]

It's less readable, and it turns out it's slower, too. Frank's solution is faster and more readable.

# benchmark on 14 million rows
dat <- data.frame(
    x = rep(c(6, 2, 3, 3, 3, 1, 1, 6, 5, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4), 1e6),
    y = rep(c(7, 5, 7, 7, 7, 5, 5, 7, 1, 2, 7, 7, 1, 7), 1e6),
    z = rep(c(rep(LETTERS[1:2], each=7)), 1e6)
)

setDT(dat)
d1 <- copy(dat)
d2 <- copy(dat)

With R 3.2.4 and data.table 1.9.7 (on Frank's computer):

system.time(d1[, c(.SD[1L], .N), by=.(g = rleidv(d1))][, g := NULL])
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.42    0.10    0.52 
system.time(d2[, g := rleidv(d2)][, N := .N, keyby = g][J(unique(g)), mult = "first"][, g := NULL][])
#    user  system elapsed 
#    2.48    0.25    2.74 
  • Your first code block makes reference to d2, but I guess you want only dat there. Also, I see different timings, actually with mine 5x as fast... odd. – Frank Apr 18 '16 at 5:12
  • 2
    3.2.3 and 1.9.7 here. Yours is about the same if I write it like system.time(d2[, g := rleidv(.SD)][, c(.N, .SD[1L]), by=g][, g := NULL][]). I think the difference may be that .SD[1L] was optimized recently. github.com/Rdatatable/data.table/issues/735 – Frank Apr 18 '16 at 5:22
  • 2
    @Frank there was a problem with my data.table installation and the datatable.dll. After fixing it, I'm getting results similar to your timings. – Jota Apr 18 '16 at 5:48
  • 2
    @Frank, right on. It was optimised. An easy way to test it is by adding verbose = TRUE to the [] call, e.g., dat[, c(.SD[1L], .N), by=.(g = rleidv(dat)), verbose=TRUE] – Arun Apr 18 '16 at 12:49
7

Not much different than the other answers, but (1) having ordered data and (2) looking for consecutive runs seems a good candidate for, just, ORing x[-1L] != x[-length(x)] accross columns instead of pasteing or other complex operations. I guess this is, somehow, equivalent to data.table::rleid.

ans = logical(nrow(dat) - 1L)
for(j in seq_along(dat)) ans[dat[[j]][-1L] != dat[[j]][-nrow(dat)]] = TRUE    
ans = c(TRUE, ans)
#or, the two-pass, `c(TRUE, Reduce("|", lapply(dat, function(x) x[-1L] != x[-length(x)])))`

cbind(dat[ans, ], n = tabulate(cumsum(ans)))
#   x y z n
#1  6 7 A 1
#2  2 5 A 1
#3  3 7 A 3
#6  1 5 A 2
#8  6 7 B 1
#9  5 1 B 1
#10 5 2 B 1
#11 6 7 B 2
#13 5 1 B 1
#14 4 7 B 1
6

Another base attempt using ave, just because:

dat$grp <- ave(
  seq_len(nrow(dat)),
  dat[c("x","y","z")],
  FUN=function(x) cumsum(c(1,diff(x))!=1)
)

dat$count <- ave(dat$grp, dat, FUN=length)

dat[!duplicated(dat[1:4]),]


#   x y z grp count
#1  6 7 A   0     1
#2  2 5 A   0     1
#3  3 7 A   0     3
#6  1 5 A   0     2
#8  6 7 B   0     1
#9  5 1 B   0     1
#10 5 2 B   0     1
#11 6 7 B   1     2
#13 5 1 B   1     1
#14 4 7 B   0     1

And a data.table conversion attempt:

d1[, .(sq=.I, grp=cumsum(c(1, diff(.I)) != 1)), by=list(x,y,z)][(sq), .N, by=list(x,y,z,grp)]

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