4

The question is to find the last but one character in a list, e.g.

?- last_but_one(X, [a,b,c,d]).
X = c.

My code is:

last_but_one(X, [X,_]).
last_but_one(X, [_|T]) :- last_but_one(X, T).

and the code they gave is:

last_but_one(X, [X,_]).
last_but_one(X, [_,Y|Ys]) :- last_but_one(X, [Y|Ys]).

When I was studying Haskell, I can recall that when questions asked for the 2nd, 3rd, or nth character in some list, the structure was the same as the answer that's been supplied, so I know writing it the way they've written it has some significance. But I still seem to get correct answers with the way I have written it.

Is the way I have written it wrong? Is the code that the guys who made the answer wrote better—and if so, how?

5
  • And a third option for the second clause: last_but_one(X, [_,Y,Z|T]) :- last_but_ont(X, [Y,Z|T]). which enforces that the 2nd argument be a list of at least 3 elements, making the constraints a little more precise. :)
    – lurker
    Apr 18, 2016 at 12:45
  • I don't agree with at least 3 - 2 elements is fine and there should still be a last but one element in this case. Why did you think that the constraint of at least 3 elements is particularly important?
    – user3186023
    Apr 24, 2016 at 3:03
  • I'm only saying it is slightly more efficient. You already have last_but_one(X, [X,_]). So to have another clause that matches a two-element list as the second argument is redundant.
    – lurker
    Apr 24, 2016 at 3:22
  • @false. Very attentive. It must have escaped me. Thx!
    – repeat
    May 2, 2016 at 14:30
  • @repeat: It made the answers look not on topic.
    – false
    May 2, 2016 at 14:31

6 Answers 6

3

Your original version is much simpler to read. In particular, the recursive rule reads - reading it right-to-left

last_but_one(X, [_|T]) :- last_but_one(X, T).
                          ^^^^^^^^^^
                              provided X is the lbo-element in T

                       ^^  then, it follows, that (that's an arrow!)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
      X is also the lbo-element of T with one more element

In other words: If you have already an lbo-element in a given list T, then you can construct new lists with any further elements in front that also have the very same lbo-element.

One might debate which version is preferable as to efficiency. If you are really into that, rather take:

last_but_one_f1(E, Es) :-
   Es = [_,_|Xs],
   xs_es_lbo(Xs, Es, E).

xs_es_lbo([], [E|_], E).
xs_es_lbo([_|Xs], [_|Es], E) :-
   xs_es_lbo(Xs, Es, E).

or even:

last_but_one_f2(E, [F,G|Es]) :-
    es_f_g(Es, F, G, E).

es_f_g([], E, _, E).
es_f_g([G|Es], _, F, E) :-
   es_f_g(Es, F, G, E).

Never forget general testing:

| ?- last_but_one(X, Es).
Es = [X,_A] ? ;
Es = [_A,X,_B] ? ;
Es = [_A,_B,X,_C] ? ;
Es = [_A,_B,_C,X,_D] ? ;
Es = [_A,_B,_C,_D,X,_E] ? ;
Es = [_A,_B,_C,_D,_E,X,_F] ? ...

And here are some benchmarks on my olde labtop:

          SICStus     SWI
          4.3.2     7.3.20-1
    --------------+----------+--------
    you   0.850s  |   3.616s |  4.25×
    they  0.900s  |  16.481s | 18.31×
    f1    0.160s  |   1.625s | 10.16×
    f2    0.090s  |   1.449s | 16.10×
    mat   0.880s  |   4.390s |  4.99×
    dcg   3.670s  |   7.896s |  2.15×
    dcgx  1.000s  |   7.885s |  7.89×
    ap    1.200s  |   4.669s |  3.89×

The reason for the big difference is that both f1 and f2 run purely determinate without any creation of a choicepoint.

Using

bench_last :-
   \+ ( length(Ls, 10000000),
        member(M, [you,they,f1,f2,mat,dcg,dcgx,ap]), write(M), write(' '),
        atom_concat(last_but_one_,M,P), \+ time(call(P,L,Ls))
   ).
3
  • 2
    Thanks a lot for this, that's really helpful :)
    – user3186023
    Apr 19, 2016 at 21:05
  • 1
    Hmm, looking back at this, that's really interesting why SWI is so slow. I used it a long time back and don't remember it being quite this slow. 16.481s for their query?? That's insane.
    – user3186023
    Apr 24, 2016 at 3:01
  • 1
    Well they read two elements and then recreate one element. At least, that' what happens in SWI.
    – false
    Apr 24, 2016 at 8:50
3

Here is another approach using DCGs. I think that this solution is much more "graphical", but it seems quite slow in SICStus:

last_but_one_dcg(L, Ls) :-
   phrase( ( ..., [L,_] ), Ls).

... --> [].
... --> [_], ... .

So we describe how a list must look like such that it has a last-but-one element. It looks like this: Anything (...) in front, and then two elements at the end.

It gets a bit faster by expanding phrase/2. Note that the expansion itself is no longer a conforming program.

last_but_one_dcgx(L, Ls) :-
   ...(Ls, Ls2),
   Ls2 = [L,_].
2

I would say both answers are just as good and I would probably have written it the way you did. What they do in the second solution is that they check, before the recursive call, that the second element is not a empty list ([]). If you trace the two different solutions on the following query: last_but_one(X,[b]).

You'll see that both give the same answer (false), but the second solution takes shorter amount of steps since it returns false before the recursive call is made.

1
  • Ah, got you. Thanks for the explanation.
    – user3186023
    Apr 18, 2016 at 6:11
2

I agree with @false that your own version is simpler to read.

Personally, I find using a DCG (see ) even easier:

last_but_one(X) --> [X,_].
last_but_one(X) -->
    [_],
    last_but_one(X).

As interface predicate, you can use:

last_but_one(L, Ls) :-
    phrase(last_but_one(L), Ls).

I now would like to add some actual timings.

We have 3 versions for comparison:

  1. the DCG version, which I call last_but_one//1
  2. your own version, which I call last_but_one_you/2
  3. their version, which I call last_but_one_they/2.

The test case consists of finding the penultimate element of a list with ten million elements.

We have:

?- length(Ls, 10_000_000), time(last_but_one(L, Ls)), false.
9,999,999 inferences, 1.400 CPU in 1.400 seconds (100% CPU, 7141982 Lips)

?- length(Ls, 10_000_000), time(last_but_one_you(L, Ls)), false.
9,999,998 inferences, 1.383 CPU in 1.383 seconds (100% CPU, 7229930 Lips)

?- length(Ls, 10_000_000), time(last_but_one_they(L, Ls)), false.
9,999,998 inferences, 5.566 CPU in 5.566 seconds (100% CPU, 1796684 Lips)

This shows that not only is the version that they provided much harder to read, it is also by far the slowest for this benchmark.

Always aim for elegance and readability first. Very often, you also obtain a fast version if you follow this principle.

1
  • Thanks for the reply and the timings information, thats helpful :)
    – user3186023
    Apr 19, 2016 at 21:04
2

Here are more ways how you could do it. I wouldn't recommend actually using any of the following methods, but IMO they are interesting as they give a different view on the other codes and on the Prolog library provided by the respective Prolog processors:

In the first three variants, we delegate the "recursive part" to built-in / library predicates:

last_but_one_append(X,Es) :-
   append(_, [X,_], Es).

:- use_module(library(lists)).
last_but_one_reverse(X, Es) :-
   reverse(Es, [_,X|_]).

last_but_one_rev(X, Es) :-  
   rev(Es, [_,X|_]).           % (SICStus only)

Alternatively, we could use vanilla home-brewed myappend/3 and myreverse/2:

myappend([], Bs, Bs).
myappend([A|As], Bs, [A|Cs]) :-
   myappend(As, Bs, Cs).

last_but_one_myappend(X, Es) :-
   myappend(_, [X,_], Es).

myreverse(Es, Fs) :-
   same_length(Es, Fs),        % for universal termination in mode (-,+)
   myreverse_(Es, Fs, []).

myreverse_([], Fs, Fs).
myreverse_([E|Es], Fs, Fs0) :-
   myreverse_(Es, Fs, [E|Fs0]).

last_but_one_myreverse(X, Es) :-
   myreverse(Es, [_,X|_]).

Let's run the experiments1!

bench_last :-
   \+ ( length(Ls, 10000000),
        member(M, [you,they,f1,f2,mat,dcg,dcgx,ap,
                   append,reverse,rev,
                   myappend,myreverse]),
        write(M), write(' '),
        atom_concat(last_but_one_,M,P),
        \+ time(call(P,_L,Ls))
   ).

Here are the runtimes2 using SICStus Prolog and SWI-Prolog3,4:

               SICStus | SICStus | SWI    |
                 4.3.2 |   4.3.3 | 7.3.20 |
    -------------------+---------+--------|
    you          0.26s |   0.10s |  0.83s |  3.1×  8.3×
    they         0.27s |   0.12s |  1.03s |  3.8×  8.5×
    f1           0.04s |   0.02s |  0.43s | 10.8× 21.5×
    f2           0.02s |   0.02s |  0.37s | 18.5× 18.5×
    mat          0.26s |   0.11s |  1.02s |  3.9×  9.0×
    dcg          1.06s |   0.77s |  1.47s |  1.3×  1.9×
    dcgx         0.31s |   0.17s |  0.97s |  3.1×  5.7×
    ap           0.23s |   0.11s |  0.42s |  1.8×  3.8×
    append       1.50s |   1.13s |  1.57s |  1.0×  1.3×
    reverse      0.36s |   0.32s |  1.02s |  2.8×  3.1×
    rev          0.04s |   0.04s |  --"-- | 25.6× 25.6×
    myappend     0.48s |   0.33s |  1.56s |  3.2×  4.7×
    myreverse    0.27s |   0.26s |  1.11s |  4.1×  4.2×

Edit: Added SICStus Prolog 4.3.3 benchmarking data

Very impressive! In the SICStus/SWI speedup column, differences > 10% got bold-faced.


Footnote 1: All measurements shown in this answer were obtained on an Intel Haswell processor Core i7-4700MQ.
Footnote 2: rev/2 is offered by SICStus—but not by SWI. We compare the fastest "reverse" library predicate.
Footnote 3: The SWI command-line option -G1G was required to prevent Out of global stack errors.
Footnote 4: Also, the SWI command-line option -O (optimize) was tried, but did not yield any improvement.

1
  • 1
    Impressive speedups by 4.3.3. What is the pattern here? Looks like programs creating choice points profit a lot.
    – false
    Jun 10, 2016 at 17:20
1

another solution :

  • firstly, the list must be of length >= 2,
  • also the last length element of the list = 1

code :

last_but_one(R,[X|Rest]):-
   (  Rest=[_], R=X
   ;  last_but_one(R,Rest)
   ). 

Test :

| ?- last_but_one(Elem,List).
List = [Elem,_A] ? ;
List = [_A,Elem,_B] ? ;
List = [_A,_B,Elem,_C] ? ;
List = [_A,_B,_C,Elem,_D] ? ;
List = [_A,_B,_C,_D,Elem,_E] ? ;
List = [_A,_B,_C,_D,_E,Elem,_F] ? ;
List = [_A,_B,_C,_D,_E,_F,Elem,_G] ? ;
List = [_A,_B,_C,_D,_E,_F,_G,Elem,_H] ? 
yes

Hope this idea help you

11
  • 1
    Your definition produces exactly one answer! - also note the different argument order.
    – false
    Apr 21, 2016 at 13:01
  • 1
    The query last_but_one(Elem, List) produces exactly one answer and not infinitely many. The -> in your definition is responsible for this.
    – false
    Apr 21, 2016 at 13:55
  • 1
    @false thank you, I test it with ',' but when I copy code over here I change it to `->'
    – Ans Piter
    Apr 21, 2016 at 14:11
  • 1
    That depends what you want. Readability or speed.
    – false
    Apr 21, 2016 at 14:49
  • 2
    And: The speed of both is exactly the same. See my answer which includes your version (ap), too
    – false
    Apr 21, 2016 at 14:57

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