10

I would like to change my ticker interval dynamically.

I've written down an example to show you how I did. My use case is something else than an "accelerometer" but I hope that it gives you an idea.

http://play.golang.org/p/6ANFnoE6pA

package main

import (
    "time"
    "log"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    interval := float64(1000)

    ticker := time.NewTicker(time.Duration(interval) * time.Millisecond)
    go func(){
        counter := 1.0
        for range ticker.C {
            log.Println("ticker accelerating to " + fmt.Sprint(interval/counter) + " ms")
            ticker = time.NewTicker(time.Duration(interval/counter) * time.Millisecond)
            counter++
        }
        log.Println("stopped")
    }()
    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
    log.Println("stopping ticker")
    ticker.Stop()
}

What is wrong is that the ticker will always "tick" every seconds and it doesn't accelerate... Any idea?

  • The code has data race – Bleeding Fingers Apr 18 '16 at 9:21
  • Because the for loop is still using the channel from the old ticker object and not using the channels from the new ticker objects. – Nipun Talukdar Apr 18 '16 at 9:36
  • Thanks for your feedbacks. @BleedingFingers I see the data race (on the ticker var), but in this case shouldn't get a panic? Otherwise the pointer should be replaced with the new one. @ NipunTalukdar I have thought the same too, if this is right - then means that the ticker pointer is "cached" in the range-loop and overriding is not possible. I will try this with another example. – damoiser Apr 18 '16 at 9:42
  • Yep, @NipunTalukdar, I guess that the range method caches the variable to be looped, then I think that overidding of the ticker like I suggested (using range) is not possible - play.golang.org/p/yZvrgURz4o – damoiser Apr 18 '16 at 10:18
7

Following the answer to @fzerorubigd but a little more complete.

As said before, we can't use the range for this case, because the range loop caches the variable to be lopped and then it can't be overwritten (example here: http://play.golang.org/p/yZvrgURz4o )

Then, we should use a for-select combination loop. Hereafter the working solution:

http://play.golang.org/p/3uJrAIhnTQ

package main

import (
    "time"
    "log"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    start_interval := float64(1000)
    quit := make(chan bool)

    go func(){
        ticker := time.NewTicker(time.Duration(start_interval) * time.Millisecond)
        counter := 1.0

        for {
            select {
            case <-ticker.C:
                log.Println("ticker accelerating to " + fmt.Sprint(start_interval/counter) + " ms")
                ticker.Stop()
                ticker = time.NewTicker(time.Duration(start_interval/counter) * time.Millisecond)
                counter++
            case <-quit:
                ticker.Stop()
                log.Println("..ticker stopped!")
                return
            }
        }
    }()

    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)

    log.Println("stopping ticker...")
    quit<-true

    time.Sleep(500 * time.Millisecond) // just to see quit messages
}
  • 1
    Will creating new time.NewTicker increase overhead of the garbage collection? – chinuy Feb 20 '18 at 19:51
  • 1
    good question @chinuy - I would say that GC is needed there even if I am doing a replacement of the var ticker. If you look at the code of time.NewTicker HERE you can see that it creates some local structs that need to be collected at some point by the garbage collector. In conclusion: yes, it increase the overhead of GC – damoiser Feb 20 '18 at 21:16
1

As Nipun Talukdar mentioned, the "for" capture the channel and use the same reference for iterate. it fixed if you use it like this :

playground

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    interval := float64(1000)

    ticker := time.NewTicker(time.Duration(interval) * time.Millisecond)
    go func() {
        counter := 1.0
        for {
            select {
            case <-ticker.C:
                log.Println("ticker accelerating to " + fmt.Sprint(interval/counter) + " ms")
                ticker = time.NewTicker(time.Duration(interval/counter) * time.Millisecond)
                counter++
            }
        }
        log.Println("stopped")
    }()
    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
    log.Println("stopping ticker")
    ticker.Stop()
}
  • Thanks for your answer. Yep, I thought too that using for-loop instead range-loop can solve the issue. Just pay attention that when using for-loop you should manage the incoming channel with a select-catcher. To avoid confusing other developers - I will accept your answer if you edit the for-code using the correctly select-cases. – damoiser Apr 18 '16 at 10:14
  • The select is not doing anything special when the case is single. but I get the idea and the code is updated. – fzerorubigd Apr 18 '16 at 10:42
  • my feedback was related to the "exit" function - to release all the variables used in the goroutines the for-loop should return. This happens even in single-case. Btw it was not asked, want just to be more precise ;-) – damoiser Apr 18 '16 at 11:11
  • 2
    It is worth noticing that when you call ticker.Stop() you don't actually close its channel, so the log.Println("stopped") line will never be reached. You should keep a secondary channel to signal when you're done and then select between the ticker and the secondary channel. You should also be stopping every old ticker before creating a new one. – hbejgel Apr 18 '16 at 19:39
  • @hbejgel the ticker.C is a receive-only channel. you can not close a receive-only channel. the owner of channel who has the whole ref to it can close it. see golang.org/pkg/time/#Ticker – fzerorubigd Apr 19 '16 at 4:15
0

What about this code:

https://play.golang.org/p/wyOTVxUW5Xj

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    startInterval := float64(1000)
    quit := make(chan bool)

    go func() {
        counter := 1.0
        for {
            select {
            case <-time.After(time.Duration(startInterval/counter) * time.Millisecond):
                log.Println("ticker accelerating to " + fmt.Sprint(startInterval/counter) + " ms")
                counter++
            case <-quit:
                log.Println("..ticker stopped!")
                return
            }
        }
    }()

    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
    log.Println("stopping ticker...")
    quit <- true
    time.Sleep(500 * time.Millisecond) // just to see quit messages
}
0

that why in go1.15 ticker.Reset is created, you don't need to create a new ticker update the existing tickers duration with ticker.Reset("new duration"), and now you will not have any cache issues

Go playground

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    interval := float64(1000)

    ticker := time.NewTicker(time.Duration(interval) * time.Millisecond)
    go func(){
        counter := 1.0
        for range ticker.C {
            log.Println("ticker accelerating to " + fmt.Sprint(interval/counter) + " ms")
            ticker.Reset(time.Duration(interval/counter) * time.Millisecond)
            counter++
        }
        log.Println("stopped")
    }()
    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
    log.Println("stopping ticker")
    ticker.Stop()
}

The reason your example have a cache issue is that when you reassign the ticker variable with a *time.ticker struct you just unlink the original *time.ticker struct from the ticker variable but the loop is still tide to the original ticker channel you need to reassin a new loop to the new time.ticker.c

  • Although reset does work, the documentation states Reset should be invoked only on stopped or expired timers with drained channels. So I wouldn't suggest resetting an active ticker. – Chen A. Oct 24 '20 at 19:55
  • 1
    you confusing it with time.timer{}.Reset() on time.tiker{}.Reset() dosn't have this worning, here is the documentation for it – Isaac Weingarten Oct 25 '20 at 23:34
  • It's worth noting ticker.Reset method is available from go1.15. – Chen A. Oct 30 '20 at 7:47
  • Please explain what’s your problem with go1.15? The compiler will work with older code – Isaac Weingarten Nov 1 '20 at 22:42
  • @Issac it's not a problem, but worth noting. I used earlier version (1.14) and it didn' work. – Chen A. Nov 3 '20 at 14:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.