1

I'm pulling JSON data from Wikipedia. However, I can't get it to stringify neatly and I don't understand why.

Here's my code.

request({url:formQuery(query), encoding:"utf8"}, (err, res, body) => {
    if (err) handleErr(err)
    console.log(JSON.stringify(body, null, 3))
})

If I just use plain console.log(body), the JSON outputs like this:

{"continue":{"rvcontinue":"20160314150329|710029514","continue":"||"},"query":{"normalized":[{ ...

But if I use stringify (as above), it looks like this:

"{\"continue\":{\"rvcontinue\":\"20160314150329|710029514\",\"continue\":\"||\"},\"query\":{\"normalized\":[{ ...

Stringify is adding a quote to the beginning of the string and escaping subsequent ones.

Why is this happening? Any help would be welcome.

  • Maybe you want an object? Try with JSON.parse(...); – Petroff Apr 18 '16 at 9:25
  • body it's already a string, thats why you stringify and get that output – Maposa Takalani Apr 18 '16 at 9:25
  • JSON.stringify converts json to string...that's correct output – Nishanth Matha Apr 18 '16 at 9:27
  • 1
    Yes. I needed to convert the body into a JSON object using parse. – user3574603 Apr 18 '16 at 9:32
1

Your JSON data is fine, the function add's slashes to the output because there are quotes in the input. The quotes around property names doesn't have to to be escaped to avoid conflicts when parsing the JSON string/output

| improve this answer | |
1

I needed to parse the body string into a JSON object first. If I parse the body string, it works.

This works fine:

request({url:formQuery(query), encoding:"utf8"}, (err, res, body) => {
    if (err) handleErr(err)
    let json = JSON.parse(body);
    console.log(JSON.stringify(json, null, 3))

})
| improve this answer | |
  • The only "JSON object" is the one that is built–in. There are strings formatted as JSON that can be parsed to create objects. – RobG Apr 18 '16 at 9:42
  • So you get a string encoded JSON, you decode it, then you string encode it again. Isn't it a bit counterproductive? The only reason for this is if you need a human readable encoding. – Quentin Roy Apr 19 '16 at 2:08
  • @QuentinRoy That's what it looks like OP intends because of the additional parameters being passed in. – David Callanan Mar 20 at 16:58
0

Without using stringify , you can use as below.

var oResultData = {"continue":{"rvcontinue":"1111","continue":"1111111"}};
var myRvcontinue = oResultData.continue.rvcontinue;
console.log(myRvcontinue); // 1111
| improve this answer | |
0

This is because the result of your request is already a string representing your object. If you stringify it again (as you do), you obtain a string representing a string representing your object.

| improve this answer | |

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