0

While working with Fibonacci sequence:

a = 1
b = 3
a, b = b, a + b
print a, b

This properly results to a = 3 and b = 4

Now if I would re-code it as:

a = 1
b = 3
a = b
b = a + b
print a, b

the resulting variable b is 6 instead of 4.

What happens "behind of scenes" when one-liner a, b = b, a + b is used?

  • b =3 #value of b is 3. a = b #value of a is 3. 3+3 is 6. What more do you want? – Sam Apr 18 '16 at 16:38
  • In the second example b = b+b because a gets the value of b one line earlier. In a one-liner it doesn't happen. – ptrj Apr 18 '16 at 16:38
  • when you write a = b you just assign b's value to variable a. – Taylan Apr 18 '16 at 16:39
  • It was quite surprising to find that a,b=b,a+b is not just the "one-liner". The syntax changes the way the code is being evaluated. – alphanumeric Apr 18 '16 at 16:40
  • 1
    Note that even the order of the variables is important. See Tuple unpacking order changes values assigned – Bhargav Rao Apr 18 '16 at 16:41
6

This is a combination of tuple packing and sequence unpacking. It is parsed the same way as

(a, b) = (b, a + b)

The tuple on the right side is evaluated before the assignment, which is why the "old" values are used.

0

You said b = 3 and then a = b and then b = a + b which is the same as b = b + b or, in other words, b = 3 + 3, so b = 6.

The first one is like a, b = 3, 1 + 3 or a, b = 3, 4 so b = 4.

0

( ) don't make the sequence a tuple, rather ,s do.

a, b = b, a + b # => (a,b) = (a, a+b) if written with brackets

So, it's standard tuple unpacking. But the thing with names a and b on the lest is they are names of different objects now, namely those known as b and result of a+b previously. This behavior is partly due to the fact that variable names in python are names, not boxes,like in C, that store values.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.