19

I want to show 50 degrees in my activity using TextView as shown below

enter image description here

I really don't know how to do this and by googling I found this XML code

android:text="50°"

And I have no idea what the above code is.
Can anyone please explain to me what exactly that does and how it works.

3
  • Doesn't 50° work?! Apr 18, 2016 at 16:59
  • The above string is a decimal representation of the unicode degree symbol Apr 18, 2016 at 17:02
  • It works for me, if I insert this character directly. Without any hex code or other fantasy methods (i.e.: entity name or how is it called). Because 1 - I use the UTF-8 declaration in my xml files. 2 - I save my files with Unicode encoding. Apr 18, 2016 at 19:10

9 Answers 9

41
  1. For Celsius ℃ use :

         "\u2103" 
    

for Fahrenheit use:

      "\u2109"

for only degree symbol without c or f use:

     "\u00B0"

For example:

      String TemperatureMeasurementStr = String.valueOf(measurement.getTemperature()) + "\u2103";

Or simple example:

      String TemperatureMeasurementStr = "37"+ "\u2103";

And set the string in your textView

      public TextView temperatureTV;                     
      temperatureTV.setText(TemperatureMeasurementStr);
  1. if you want just to add the symbol to the xml layout file - just use:

       android:text="37\u2103"
    

for example:

<TextView
     android:id="@+id/temperature_measure"
     android:layout_width="wrap_content"
     android:layout_height="wrap_content"
     android:layout_alignTop="@+id/temperature_icon"
     android:layout_marginBottom="-5dp"
     android:layout_marginLeft="10dp"
     android:layout_toRightOf="@+id/temperature_icon"
     android:text="37\u2103"
     android:textAlignment="center"
     android:textSize="50sp"
  />
  1. if you want this symbol to be smaller or in different color or style then the number (lets say "normal" while the number itself is "bold") then you can use SpannableString:

Like this:

String TemperatureMeasurementStr = String.valueOf(measurement.getTemperature()) + "\u2103";
SpannableString tempSpan=  new SpannableString(TemperatureMeasurementStr);
if (TemperatureMeasurement.length() >0){
   
    //the symbol will be smaller then the number
    tempSpan.setSpan(new RelativeSizeSpan(0.7f),TemperatureMeasurementStr.length() - 1, TemperatureMeasurementStr.length(), 0);

    //the number style will be bold and the symbol normal
   tempSpan.setSpan(new android.text.style.StyleSpan(Typeface.BOLD), 0,   TemperatureMeasurementStr.length()-1, 0);
  
    //the symbol color will be yellow
   tempSpan.setSpan(new ForegroundColorSpan(Color.YELLOW), TemperatureMeasurementStr.length() - 1, TemperatureMeasurementStr.length(), 0);
 }
 temperatureTV.setText(tempSpan);

Finally, if you want just to type the degree symbol "°" in any editor in windows (include android studio) just use:

                                    Alt+0176  

or

                                    Alt+248 
12

&#xb0; is just the standard way of inserting special characters into XML. You can refer to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_XML_and_HTML_character_entity_references for a more full description, but to break it down:

  • & indicates it's the start of a special character.
  • # means the character is indicated with a number (versus a special string code, e.g. &amp; for ampersands).
  • x means the numeric code is a hexadecimal value.
  • b0 the hex value for the degree symbol (176 in decimal).
  • ; ends the sequence.

An alternative representation would be &#176; which uses the decimal value instead of hex.

Hence, you can insert any special character if you know its ASCII decimal/hex value.

5

There're a lot of ways to do it :

1.- You can create a char as follows :

char degreesymbol = '\u00B0';

Then you can add it on your TextView

2.- You can put it on your XML as follows :

android:text="50&#x2103;"

3.- And if you want to make it programmatically do it as follows :

YOURTEXTVIEW.setText((Your_Temperature) + " \u2109");
2

&#xb0; is the HTML hex encoding for a degree symbol.

1

'&#xb0' it's the unicode character for degree. Special characters are used in unicode format. (If you don't use the unicode character, usually shows up an alert)

Source: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/b0/index.htm

And if you want to know why you should use unicode characters, this website explains it: 'Unicode provides a unique number for every character(...) If your document calls for U+0289 it will be clear to any computer program what the character should be' http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&id=UTConvertQ1

1

android:text="50&#xb0; specifically &#xb0; is the HTML hex encoding!

Also,you can use &#176; it's the same thing.

For more http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/b0/index.htm

if you want to use code try this: myTextView.setText ( "50" + (char) 0x00B0 );

1
<TextView
   android:layout_width="wrap_content"
   android:layout_height="wrap_content"
   android:text="\u00B0"/>
1
  • While this may answer the OP's question, a few words of explanation will help current and future users.
    – Thom
    Jul 9, 2018 at 18:43
0

The typographic symbol in the form of a superscript circle, which is usually denoted by the size of the values ​​of angles and temperatures, measured in degrees celsius symbol, is absent on the computer keyboard. However, in the encoding tables, the operating system uses to display characters on a computer screen. It is one of the first 128 characters in this table, which allows it to be used even in documents of the simplest text formats – for example, txt.

1
  • "is absent on the computer keyboard." - Not on mine - ° :) Whether or not this character is present on the keyboard or not depends on your keyboard. Aug 26, 2020 at 19:17
0

In XML, if you want to show android:text="32°" you can use:

<TextView
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"      
android:text="32&#xb0;"
android:id="@+id/myTV"></TextView>

To do it programmatically, you can use:

myTV.setText("32" + (char) 0x00B0); 

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