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I tested this on my machine by creating new connections until failure. On my machine new connect()/accept() requests fail* at near 700 socket connections (SOCK_STREAM); at the client/server respectively, on the loopback IP address. However the socket file descriptor returned by accept(), so far, is always bound to the same port as the listening socket.

My question is - If this behaviour is true for all machines then why is accept() limiting connections by creating connected sockets bound only to the same port as the listening socket? Couldn't the number of connections the server can make be increased greatly if the new sockets were bound to random ports (like connect() does)?

Also, why is accept(sock_fd, NULL, NULL) failing with "EFAULT - The addr argument is not in a writable part of the user address space." after nearly 700 successful iterations of the same call?

Similarly, why does, connect() fail with "EFAULT - The socket structure address is outside the user's address space." after nearly 700 successful iterations of the same call?

* EFAULT - Bad Address (after both accept()/connect()).

  • What operating system are you working on? What does your actual code look like? Is it exactly 700, or another number in that range? – Roland Illig Apr 19 '16 at 5:47
  • Cygwin on Windows. The actual number varies at around that mark in different runs (say between 650 to 750). – work.bin Apr 19 '16 at 5:54
  • What makes you think reusing the same port is 'limiting connections'? – user207421 Feb 8 at 23:49
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When you are listening, all connections will have the same port in the accept end of the connection (that is what is used as an identifier initially in order to establish the connection).

The local port number for the connecting part if not defined with a bind() can be anything. For the localhost device, the numbers can probably be recycled very fast on some OS, since there is no real need for lingering state of the TCP.

When it comes to having MANY connections on the same time, the amount of connections possible is limited by resources in your operating system per process. For Unix/Linux, this limit can be adjusted, put it is not advised to make the amount of FDs higher than default if using select(), since the libc size of the FDSET usually matches the default number of filedescriptors available per process. One trick around this is to create the socket, fork out children and let the children call accept(). Then each children can have many connections (apache and squid use this kind of model), increasing the total amount of connections possible on the same server port.

  • The port number to which the new socket fd returned by accept() is bound to isn't specified by the caller, neither does the man page for accept() stipulate any conditions regarding the port number for the new socket fd. Which, IMO leaves it open for accept() to possibly bind the new socket to different port number. My question is, is that possible (i.e. for accept() to return a socket fd bound to a port number different than that of the listening socket)? – work.bin Apr 19 '16 at 11:14
  • @work.bin The port number to which the new socket fd returned by accept() is bound to isn't specified by the caller What do you mean by "not specified"? It's the same as in listen(). – Matt Apr 19 '16 at 11:33
  • I meant explicitly. It is nowhere mentioned (as far as I have read) that the socket fd returned by accept() 'shall be' bound to the same port as the listening port. – work.bin Apr 19 '16 at 12:01
  • @work.bin It's how TCP works so presumably it's mentioned in the TCP standard. Of course, the TCP standard doesn't say anything about sockets, only connections. – immibis Nov 8 '16 at 23:26
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why is accept() limiting connections by creating connected sockets bound only to the same port as the listening socket? Couldn't the number of connections the server can make be increased greatly if the new sockets were bound to random ports (like connect() does)?

It doesn't impose any limitations. A connected TCP socket's "address" should be viewed as four parameters: srcip, srcport, dstip, dstport. So there's absolutely no need to bind accept()'ed socket to a random port.

Also, why is accept(sock_fd, NULL, NULL) failing with "EFAULT - The addr argument is not in a writable part of the user address space." after nearly 700 successful iterations of the same call?

Well, it's about OS internals. The amount of resources for any user process may (and should be) limited. Read your OS developer manual or such.

  • Is there an upper limit on the number of sockets that can be associated with a single 'srcport'? If yes, that would be a good reason to bind to random ports. – work.bin Apr 19 '16 at 11:07
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    @work.bin I believe it depends on OS implementation. Also note that if accept could change the port binding then it should somehow notify its network peer too. Such thing isn't provided by any TCP standard, I believe. – Matt Apr 19 '16 at 11:19
  • @work.bin But if you really want it, you can make an application-level "feature" to support that. Consider, for example, FTP PORT or PASV commands implementation. – Matt Apr 19 '16 at 11:38

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