18

How should I define large strings in VBA? Is there a better way than coding something like the below?

Dim largeString as String
largeString = "This is a long block of text that I want to fill " & _
              "into a form field. I need to make sure I pay attention " & _
              "to spacing and carriage return issues while doing so. " & _
              "I also have to use quotes liberally, the concatenation " & _
              "operator, and the continuance underscore to make sure " & _
              "VBA can parse my code." & vbCr & vbCr & _
              "It's kind of a pain in the ass and I wish I could use " & _
              "a heredoc instead, letting me copy and paste the block" & _
              "of text I need from another source and shove it into " & _
              "a string."

Edit: Ugh, and there's a 25 line continuation limit too? So much for nice indenting and 80 characters of width, that only gives me enough room for a couple decent paragraphs.

2
  • or create a String on fly Dim s as String and s = String(1337, "a")
    – user2140173
    Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 11:50
  • i think you'll see my answer eliminates this problem stackoverflow.com/a/67154039/209942
    – johny why
    Commented Jul 5, 2021 at 13:51

5 Answers 5

15

I prefer doing it in this way:

Dim lStr As String
lStr = ""

lStr = lStr & "This is a long block of text that I want to fill "
lStr = lStr & "into a form field. I need to make sure I pay attention "
lStr = lStr & "to spacing and carriage return issues while doing so. "
lStr = lStr & "I also have to use quotes liberally, the concatenation "
lStr = lStr & "operator, and the continuance underscore to make sure "
lStr = lStr & "VBA can parse my code." & vbCr & vbCr
lStr = lStr & "It's kind of a pain in the ass and I wish I could use "
lStr = lStr & "a heredoc instead, letting me copy and paste the block"
lStr = lStr & "of text I need from another source and shove it into "
lStr = lStr & "a string."

I think this method is easier to work with than the line continuation method and there is no line number limit to get in with this way. You can comment out individual lines, which is useful for debugging SQL strings.

When handling long strings, I find it easier to use short variable names because VBA does not have the equivalent of += operator. largeString = largeString & "" takes up too much space and gets repetitive, so shortening the string name makes the format somewhat bearable.

For very large blocks of text, write it in a text editor then copy and paste it into your procedure. Then copy

lStr = lStr & "

and paste it at the beginning of each line. The VBA editor will automatically add the quotes at the end of the line making the process simple to do.

7
  • 2
    I like this syntax for line continuation but I ask "Why" Why would someone need such a large string that couldn't be placed elsewhere? And, this reminds me of all those VBA bandits who think the height of programming is concatenation. Commented Sep 9, 2010 at 20:59
  • 1
    @ChrisHayes maybe because one is asked to keep the query inside the excel file, and one preffers to have in like this than as a cell value?
    – pablete
    Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 15:49
  • 1
    The limit here is 64k - that's how large a single VBA code module can be.
    – Blackhawk
    Commented Oct 14, 2014 at 16:18
  • @ChrisHayes Suppose I need to pass a large XML file to another application, this seems like the simplest and cleanest solution. Commented Jan 3, 2017 at 9:30
  • 1
    Maybe not a big issue with modern processors, but repeated concatenation is much more processor intensive in ASP than making a long string in a single multiple-line assignment (or multiple response.writes.) This page has some speed comparisons -- somacon.com/p236.php -- it's something like a 23x improvement!
    – Stephen R
    Commented Nov 10, 2017 at 22:57
13

No, this is as good as it gets.

For really long strings it might be an option to keep the string in a separate file, or use some application feature. For example, in Word, you might want to store the string in a document variable, as hidden text or AutoText. In Excel, you might consider a hidden sheet for storing long string constants.

4
  • Yeah, I was considering something like that. Another option would be to make a form that never gets shown that contains text boxes that contain the text I want then just use the .Value() of them. Only downside is that I can see maintenance of a workaround like that being a huge nightmare. It's not like VBA maintenance is a walk in the park though :/
    – Oesor
    Commented Sep 8, 2010 at 19:52
  • I like this answer but maybe something like a text stream to a text file. Maybe that's too much though? Commented Sep 9, 2010 at 20:58
  • @Chris: I'm not sure what you mean. Actually keeping the string in a text file was the first option I mentioned. Commented Sep 9, 2010 at 21:57
  • 1
    The downside to doing it in a text file instead of code embedded in an Office document is now you have multiple files you need to maintain. For a small, self-contained VBA app that's going a little overboard.
    – Oesor
    Commented Sep 10, 2010 at 13:19
5

Another way is to store the text in comments, then parse it in a function. No external files required, good readability.

' TEXT to retrieve:
'   SELECT
'   field1, field2
'   FROM table1

Function SQL_in_comments()
    SQL_in_comments = Replace(Replace(Application.VBE.ActiveCodePane.CodeModule.Lines(2, 3), "'   ", ""), "'", "")
End Function
1

I find this method handy for embedding/defining large VBA strings, embedding whole text files for reading into a string variable or for recreating embedded binary files, all from the comments at the top of a module.

First, use the following VBS script to create compressed, Base64 encoded, 255 character wide comment lines from a file (text or binary) dropped into it's icon:

Dim wsh, fso
Set wsh = wscript.CreateObject("wscript.Shell")
Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.fileSystemObject")

On Error Resume Next

'DROP-IN HANDLER
'***************
If WScript.Arguments.Count > 0 Then
    For each arg in WScript.Arguments  
        path_and_filename = path_and_filename & arg
    Next
    tokens = Split(path_and_filename, "\")
    infilename = tokens(UBound(tokens))
    For i=0 To UBound(tokens)-1
        path = path & tokens(i) & "\"
    Next
else
    wsh.Popup "No drop-in file!" & vbcrlf & vbcrlf & "Drag the icon of the file you want to compress and convert to VBA comment format" & vbcrlf & "and drop it into the Bin2VBAComment.vbs icon.", 0, "Error!", 4096+16
    wscript.quit
End If

outfilename = infilename & "-Comment.txt"
tempfile = fso.GetTempName

'MAKECAB NEEDS THE TRAILING "\" REMOVED FROM THE PATH TO COMPRESS THE FILE
'*************************************************************************
wsh.run ("cmd /c makecab  /L """ & left(path,len(path)-1) & """ """ & WScript.Arguments(0) & """ " & tempfile ),0,True

'BASE64 ENCODE THE COMPRESSED CAB FILE
'*************************************
bytes_ = readBytes(path & tempfile)
base64_ = encodeBase64(bytes_)

'REMOVE THE LINE FEEDS AT CHARACTER 72...
'****************************************
base64_ = replace(base64_,vblf,"")

'...SO WE CAN PUT THEM AFTER CHARACTER 255
'*****************************************
x=1
linecount_=0
do while x<len(base64_)
    out_ = out_ & "'" & Mid(base64_,x,255) & vbcrlf
    x=x+255
    linecount_=linecount_+1
loop

'CREATE THE TEXT FILE
'********************
set objOutputFile = fso.CreateTextFile(path & outfilename, TRUE)
objOutputFile.WriteLine("'" & infilename)
objOutputFile.WriteLine("'" & linecount_)
objOutputFile.Write(out_)
objOutputFile.Close

'TIDY-UP
'*******
if fso.FileExists(path & tempfile) then
    Set aFile = fso.GetFile(path & tempfile)
    aFile.Delete
end if

wsh.Popup "Done!", 2, "Bin2VBAComment.vbs", 4096+48

private function readBytes(file)
    dim inStream
    set inStream = WScript.CreateObject("ADODB.Stream")
    inStream.Open
    inStream.type= 1 'TypeBinary
    inStream.LoadFromFile(file)
    readBytes = inStream.Read()
end function

private function encodeBase64(bytes)
    dim DM, EL
    Set DM = CreateObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM")
    Set EL = DM.createElement("tmp")
    EL.DataType = "bin.base64"
    EL.NodeTypedValue = bytes
    encodeBase64 = EL.Text
end function

As an example, I dropped in a QR code image that created "QR.png-Comment.txt":

'QR.png
'3
'TVNDRgAAAAA0AgAAAAAAACwAAAAAAAAAAwEBAAEAAAAAAAAAQwAAAAEAAQDoAQAAAAAAAAAAGVdVjCAAUVIucG5nAJuWuhbpAegBQ0vrDPBz5+WS4mJgYOD19HAJYmBgnADCjMxAkV2FS/qBFGNxkLsTw7pzMi+BHJZ0R19HBoaN/dx/ElmBfLYAnxBXIP3///+lN+ffBbI4CzwiixkY+A6DMOPx/BUpQCOyPV0cQypuvb0Z2HVEgachUZH99VX
'biINH3ZJjyreF/jb60J6Ykb2vkutkhvMsPg4WpkYHBYET2ydJZJ0o1X760FDHUaF7yZ048fRzZwpjS7wFTrB1hj90LVwlFN3kEKeoG9ymyvHENchdi+WT2EdxVXWbeScETuhymi4x2futEKja6GPgrvsvL9c4KGgfqZq79Om+5yEiHCndL5x1Tyw4WaUrf1ybxch1C8dWvv6opSu3HQzaCLTg48WtBy/IPnRSsD7y/MiF+RURxi0OZR0l7Zm/sh
'w8/8txMUUq/it4LHHP9mcjd+OaiWa2568xTK7nN+0L50hpi/C99U7B6/HBfyccFVYfaVe97fH3izgfU6VfTr9ATO2/WTsFTohNDJu8MTxs2uOKVodlHiWmlTtsm47NT+UEmiXz9Y6zOfctoeAmh3uK0zLf6nn9bnOY5pm+VkHeL4XjybQrhlJZkc/kX/Zf/3c70kGhPEVNQQASZvFuQb8YuQNVPbev2/YAGBcMnq5+LuucEpoA

Paste this text into the top of a Module (e.g. Module1).

At the top of the "ThisWorkbook" macros, create a global variable for the file name so you can delete it on Workbook_BeforeClose

Public BinFilename As String

and then add the following macros:

Private Sub Workbook_Open()

Set wsh = CreateObject("wscript.Shell")
Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

'ACTIVATE THE MODULE CONTAINING THE COMPRESSED TEXT AT THE TOP
ThisWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents("Module1").Activate

'GET THE FILE NAME FROM THE FIRST LINE
filename_ = Replace(Application.VBE.ActiveCodePane.CodeModule.Lines(1, 1), "'", "")

'SET THE GLOBAL VARIABLE SO WE CAN DELETE THE FILE ON CLOSE
BinFilename = filename_

'GET THE NUMBER OF LINES FROM THE SECOND LINE
no_of_lines_ = Replace(Application.VBE.ActiveCodePane.CodeModule.Lines(2, 1), "'", "")

'GET THE BASE64 TEXT FROM LINE 3 ONWARDS, REMOVING COMMENT TICKS, CARRIAGE RETURNS AND SPACES
base64_ = Replace(Application.VBE.ActiveCodePane.CodeModule.Lines(3, no_of_lines_), "'", "")
base64_ = Replace(base64_, vbCrLf, "")
base64_ = Replace(base64_, " ", "")

'GET THE LOCAL TEMP DIRECTORY AND A TEMP FILE NAME
tempFolderPath = fso.GetSpecialFolder(2)
tempfilename = tempFolderPath & "\" & fso.GetTempName

'CONVERT THE BASE64 TEXT TO POPULATE THE TEMP COMPRESSED FILE
    Dim DM, EL
    Set DM = CreateObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM")
    Set EL = DM.createElement("tmp")
    EL.DataType = "bin.base64"
    EL.Text = base64_

    Dim binaryStream
    Set binaryStream = CreateObject("ADODB.Stream")
    binaryStream.Type = 1 'adTypeBinary
    binaryStream.Open
    binaryStream.Write EL.NodeTypedValue
    binaryStream.SaveToFile tempfilename, 2

'DECOMPRESS THE TEMP FILE TO RECREATE THE ORIGINAL FILE
wsh.Run ("cmd /c expand -F:* """ & tempfilename & """ """ & tempFolderPath & "\" & filename_ & """"), 0, True

'DELETE THE TEMP FILE
fso.DeleteFile (tempfilename)

'DECIDE WHAT TO DO WITH THE FILE
If LCase(Right(filename_, 3)) = "txt" Then
    'LOAD THE TEXT FILE CONTENTS INTO A VARIABLE
    LoadFileStr = fso.OpenTextFile(tempFolderPath & "\" & filename_, 1).readall
    MsgBox LoadFileStr
Else
    'ASSUME IT'S A BINARY FILE AND RUN IT
    wsh.Run ("cmd /c " & Chr(34) & tempFolderPath & "\" & filename_ & Chr(34)), 0, False
End If


End Sub

and

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeClose(Cancel As Boolean)

'DELETE THE CREATED FILE ON EXIT
    Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    fso.DeleteFile (fso.GetSpecialFolder(2) & "\" & BinFilename)

End Sub

The Workbook_Open macro looks at the Module1 comment, extracts the original file name from the first line and passes it to "BinFilename" for deletion purposes. It then gets the number of lines from line 2, and the Base64 text from lines 3 onwards.

The Base64 text is decoded, decompressed using the Microsoft Expand function and the file is then created in your temp directory.

A .txt file is read and it's contents passed to the "LoadFileStr" variable. Any other file type is run as a binary file.

Workbook_BeforeClose deletes the file from the temp directory on close.

0

In Excel, there's a much easier way than other answers here. Let Excel do the heavy lifting for you. This method will not require to break the string into smaller chunks -- it can handle up to 32,767 characters at once.

Put the string into a cell. Set aside a scrap worksheet for this purpose. Name the cell, eg MyLongString.

[MyLongString] = "It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like)."

Now you can refer to the name in VBA as [MyLongString]. Eg:

MsgBox [MyLongString]

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