63

Let's say there are two arrays...

var array1 = ["a", "b", "c"]
var array2 = ["b", "c", "a"]

I'd like the result of the comparison of these two arrays to be true, and the following...

var array1 = ["a", "b", "c"]
var array2 = ["b", "c", "a", "d"]

...to be false. How can I achieve that in Swift? I tried to convert both arrays to sets but for some reason Set() keeps removing some (usually duplicated) objects that the array contains.

Any help would be appreciated.

3
  • 5
    What about ["a","b"] and ["a", "a", "b"], should they compare true or false? Apr 19, 2016 at 9:45
  • False, but ["a", "a", "b"] and ["a", "b", "a"] as true. Apr 19, 2016 at 9:47
  • 9
    Just to comment - "... but for some reason Set() keeps removing some (usually duplicated) objects" - yes, that's because, by definition, sets do not contain duplicates. Apr 20, 2016 at 6:01

10 Answers 10

111

Swift 3, 4

extension Array where Element: Comparable {
    func containsSameElements(as other: [Element]) -> Bool {
        return self.count == other.count && self.sorted() == other.sorted()
    }
}

// usage
let a: [Int] = [1, 2, 3, 3, 3]
let b: [Int] = [1, 3, 3, 3, 2]
let c: [Int] = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3]

print(a.containsSameElements(as: b)) // true
print(a.containsSameElements(as: c)) // false

9
  • 1
    Very nice, most probably I would not come up with the idea to sort the elements first. Thanks to everyone that responded. Apr 19, 2016 at 10:16
  • Works like a charm! Saved my day :)
    – Cityzen26
    May 11, 2018 at 13:57
  • Thank-you for an elegant and easily reusable solution but the count comparison appears to be unnecessary.
    – Marcy
    Jun 27, 2020 at 23:51
  • 1
    @lzl Performance measures with and without the count clause have no discernible performance difference.The == operation on arrays (Swift source code) first checks the counts before comparing arrays element by element.
    – Marcy
    Oct 23, 2020 at 0:32
  • 1
    @Marcy I didn't know that, well then in that case I can't think of a reason to compare count
    – lzl
    Oct 24, 2020 at 14:13
8

you can do something like this:

  array1.sortInPlace()
  array2.sortInPlace()

  print(array1,array2)

  if array1 == array2 {
    print("equal")
  } else {
  print("not equal") 
  }

and if don't want change origional array we can do

 let sorted1 = array1.sort()
 let sorted2 = array2.sort()

  if sorted1 == sorted2 {
    print("equal")
  }else {
    print("not equal")
  }
0
8

Using Set

let array1 = ["a", "b", "c"]
let array2 = ["b", "c", "a", "c"]

let set1 = Set(array1)
let set2 = Set(array2)

if (set1.count == set2.count && set1 == set2) { //if you compare big sets it is recommended to compare the count of items in the sets beforehand
    //they are identical
}

The Set implements Hashable so the task is to implement the hash function to work with a Set

5
  • 1
    It was described in the question that using Set doesn't work since the arrays might contain duplicates. Aug 7, 2019 at 17:35
  • 1
    You also have to compare the count.
    – Alexander
    Sep 11, 2019 at 14:41
  • 2
    The sets won't work for arrays that can contain duplicates, but whenever the programmer assumes there are no duplicates - Set's speed is just magical in comparison going through the hassle of sorting both arrays Dec 20, 2019 at 11:24
  • This solution doesn't work if there are duplicates. The solution needs to compare count of the arrays, not the sets. In the current example, they should not be identical because array2 has a duplicate. If comparison is done on Array counts then it correctly reports they do not have the same elements. Saying they're identical is also misleading as order makes them not identical.
    – David
    Mar 9 at 15:43
  • Comparing counts and contents of the Sets isn't enough. The following two arrays would be seen as identical: ["a", "a", "b"] and ["a", "b", "b"]. May 18 at 13:51
8

Swift 5.2 Solution

var array1 = ["a", "b", "c"]
var array2 = ["b", "c", "a"]

if array1.sorted() == array2.sorted() {
    print("array 1 & array 2 are same")
}
3

I know this question is old, and it also didn't want to determine if array1 was a subset of array2. However, This works in Swift 5.3 and Xcode 12.3:

var array1 = ["a", "b", "c"]
var array2 = ["b", "c", "a", "d"]

print("array1 == array2? \(Set(array1) == Set(array2))")
print("array1 subset to array2? \(Set(array1).isSubset(of: Set(array2)))")
2

Create function to compare them:

func containSameElements(var firstArray firstArray: [String], var secondArray: [String]) -> Bool {
    if firstArray.count != secondArray.count {
        return false
    } else {
        firstArray.sortInPlace()
        secondArray.sortInPlace()
        return firstArray == secondArray
    }
}

Then:

var array1 = ["a", "a", "b"]
var array2 = ["a", "b", "a"]

var array3 = ["a", "b", "c"]
var array4 = ["b", "c", "a", "d"]

print(containSameElements(firstArray: array1, secondArray: array2)) //true
print(containSameElements(firstArray: array3, secondArray: array4)) //false
print(array1) //["a", "a", "b"]
print(array2) //["a", "b", "a"]
print(array3) //["a", "b", "c"]
print(array4) //["b", "c", "a", "d"]
5
  • Typically a boolean check shouldn't mutate its arguments.
    – OrangeDog
    Apr 19, 2016 at 14:18
  • Oh, I remember now, Swift has mental calling conventions for arrays.
    – OrangeDog
    Apr 19, 2016 at 14:24
  • I don't know about this. Can you give me an example.
    – Khuong
    Apr 19, 2016 at 14:32
  • I think they are (or at least used to be) copy-on-write but what constituted a write was sometimes surprising. Anyway your code is fine - you mutate a copy, not the original.
    – OrangeDog
    Apr 19, 2016 at 14:36
  • You mean var firstArray firstArray: [String] should be You mean inout firstArray: [String]?
    – Khuong
    Apr 19, 2016 at 14:46
2

Here is a solution that does not require the element to be Comparable, but only Equatable. It is much less efficient than the sorting answers, so if your type can be made Comparable, use one of those.

extension Array where Element: Equatable {
    func equalContents(to other: [Element]) -> Bool {
        guard self.count == other.count else {return false}
        for e in self{
          guard self.filter{$0==e}.count == other.filter{$0==e}.count else {
            return false
          }
        }
        return true
    }
}
1
  • If the element is Hashable, then you can iterate through only Set(self).
    – Asa Zeren
    May 14, 2018 at 0:07
1

Solution for Swift 4.1/Xcode 9.4:

extension Array where Element: Equatable {
    func containSameElements(_ array: [Element]) -> Bool {
        var selfCopy = self
        var secondArrayCopy = array
        while let currentItem = selfCopy.popLast() {
            if let indexOfCurrentItem = secondArrayCopy.index(of: currentItem) {
                secondArrayCopy.remove(at: indexOfCurrentItem)
            } else {
                return false
            }
        }
        return secondArrayCopy.isEmpty
    }
}

The main advantage of this solution is that it uses less memory than other (it always creates just 2 temporary arrays). Also, it does not require for Element to be Comparable, just to be Equatable.

1

If elements of your arrays are conforming to Hashable you can try to use the bag (it's like a set with the registration of each item amount). Here I will use a simplified version of this data structure based on Dictionary. This extension helps to create bag from array of Hashable:

extension Array where Element: Hashable {
    var asBag: [Element: Int] {
        return reduce(into: [:]) {
            $0.updateValue(($0[$1] ?? 0) + 1, forKey: $1)
        }
    }
}

Now you need to generate 2 bags from initial arrays and compare them. I wrapped it in this extension:

extension Array where Element: Hashable {
    func containSameElements(_ array: [Element]) -> Bool {
        let selfAsBag = asBag
        let arrayAsBag = array.asBag
        return selfAsBag.count == arrayAsBag.count && selfAsBag.allSatisfy {
            arrayAsBag[$0.key] == $0.value
        }
    }
}

This solution was tested with Swift 4.2/Xcode 10. If your current Xcode version is prior to 10.0 you can find the function allSatisfy of ArraySlice in Xcode9to10Preparation. You can install this library with CocoaPods.

-1

if I have

    array1 = ["x", "y", "z"]
    array2 = ["a", "x", "c"]

I can do

    array1.filter({array2.contains($0})

to return ["x"]

and likewise

    array1.filter({!array2.contains($0)})

to return ["y", "z"]

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