113

I have a simple case of pushing unique values into array. It looks like this:

  this.items = [];

  add(item) {
    if(this.items.indexOf(item) > -1) {
      this.items.push(item);
      console.log(this.items);
    }
  }

Seems pretty straight-forward, right? No, as it appears. It doesn't add any values. I am sure it's some kind of silly mistake on my side, but I can't seem to find it.

0

15 Answers 15

172

Yep, it's a small mistake.

if(this.items.indexOf(item) === -1) {
    this.items.push(item);
    console.log(this.items);
}
4
92

You can use the Set structure from ES6 to make your code faster and more readable:

// Create Set
this.items = new Set();

add(item) {
    this.items.add(item);

    // Set to array
    console.log([...this.items]);
}
5
  • @Gags not true, work on all major recent browsers. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Nov 16, 2018 at 7:50
  • 3
    As a heads up. If like me you use JSON.stringify in your code, adding Sets will cause issues without further updates. Jan 24, 2019 at 16:48
  • 2
    I LOVE this. Had nearly forgotten about set. I'm going to be using this a lot, particularly nice in TypeScript. Aug 27, 2019 at 20:55
  • 2
    @JohnDuskin can you elaborate? Your comment might somehow suggest that using JSON.stringify in "your code", as in one scope?, with also using Set object, like even somewhere else in such scope/code? Or as more probable you mean using Set object as an argument to JSON.stringify. As in using them in one expression. An issue described here with solutions.
    – papo
    Apr 26, 2021 at 15:44
  • 3
    @papo You're correct, on re-reading my comment it was a vague. You are correct in your interpretation, adding Sets to a JSON.stringify command causes issues (as per the issue you linked to) and the solution is that you need to convert it to an array. This can be more complex however if you are stringifying higher level objects that contain sets, so its something people should be aware of. Apr 27, 2021 at 7:59
23

try .includes()

[1, 2, 3].includes(2);     // true
[1, 2, 3].includes(4);     // false
[1, 2, 3].includes(3, 3);  // false
[1, 2, 3].includes(3, -1); // true
[1, 2, NaN].includes(NaN); // true

so something like

const array = [1, 3];
if (!array.includes(2))
    array.push(2);

note the browser compatibility at the bottom of the page, however.

1
  • 2
    I think this is definitely more elegant than .indexOf. I never knew this existed before. Apr 16, 2019 at 4:01
13

Using Set

this.items = new Set();
this.items.add(1);
this.items.add(2);
this.items.add(1);
this.items.add(2);

console.log(Array.from(this.items)); // [1, 2]
9

In case if you are looking for one liner

For primitives

(this.items.indexOf(item) === -1) && this.items.push(item);

For objects

this.items.findIndex((item: ItemType) => item.var === checkValue) === -1 && this.items.push(item);
1
  • 2
    you though missing the brackets '(' for the expression
    – ajin
    Sep 24, 2020 at 13:55
8

If you use Lodash, take a look at _.union function:

let items = [];
items = _.union([item], items)
0
7

Your logic is saying, "if this item exists already, then add it." It should be the opposite of that.

Change it to...

if (this.items.indexOf(item) == -1) {
    this.items.push(item);
}
7

I guess ES6 has set data structure, which you can use for unique entries

2
  • 2
    Set() yes, but I needed an array. Apr 19, 2016 at 14:59
  • 1
    Set is also an array, store sequential data but only unique one not duplicate. Apr 19, 2016 at 16:52
3

You have to use === -1, if it equals to -1 i.e. item is not available in your array:

  this.items = [];

  add(item) {
    if(this.items.indexOf(item) === -1) {
      this.items.push(item);
      console.log(this.items);
    }
  }
3

Simple as possible!

  let items = [];
  const addItem = (item) => {
    items = [...new Set([...items, item])]
  };
2

This can be achieved with single line of code.

this.items = this.items.includes(item) ? this.items : [...this.items, item];
1
var helper = {};
for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++){
  helper[data[i]] = 1; // Fill object
}
var result = Object.keys(helper); // Unique items
1

Push always unique value in array

ab = [
     {"id":"1","val":"value1"},
     {"id":"2","val":"value2"},
     {"id":"3","val":"value3"}
   ];



var clickId = [];
var list = JSON.parse(ab);
$.each(list, function(index, value){
    if(clickId.indexOf(value.id) < 0){
        clickId.push(value.id);
    }
});
0

so not sure if this answers your question but the indexOf the items you are adding keep returning -1. Not to familiar with js but it appears the items do that because they are not in the array yet. I made a jsfiddle of a little modified code for you.

this.items = [];

add(1);
add(2);
add(3);

document.write("added items to array");
document.write("<br>");
function  add(item) {
        //document.write(this.items.indexOf(item));
    if(this.items.indexOf(item) <= -1) {

      this.items.push(item);
      //document.write("Hello World!");
    }
}

document.write("array is : " + this.items);

https://jsfiddle.net/jmpalmisano/Lnommkbw/2/

0

Simple use new Set() with concat. The most performant mostly and updated:

console.log([...new Set(["hey", "we", "have", "array"].concat(["hey", "we", "add", "these", "too", "but without second hey, we, have :)"]))])

If you want to add elements in a case insensitive way, please do this for arrays;i.e:

["hey", "we", "HaVe", "ArrAy"].filter(r => r !== '').map(r => r.toUpperCase())

This will check whether empty element:

.filter(r => r !== '')

Will check case insensitive:

.map(r => r.toUpperCase()

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