289

What is the difference between require_relative and require in Ruby?

  • 9
    Before 1.9.2 there was no need for require_relative, because current directory of script was in $:. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2900370 – Nakilon Sep 9 '10 at 20:43
  • 1
    require_relative requires a file specifically pointed to relative to the file that calls it. require requires a file included in the $LOAD_PATH. – Donato Mar 29 '18 at 18:38
287

Just look at the docs:

require_relative complements the builtin method require by allowing you to load a file that is relative to the file containing the require_relative statement.

For example, if you have unit test classes in the "test" directory, and data for them under the test "test/data" directory, then you might use a line like this in a test case:

require_relative "data/customer_data_1"
  • 25
    Is there a difference between require './file.rb' and require_relative 'file.rb'? – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件 Oct 25 '14 at 17:31
  • 64
    @CiroSantilli Yes. require_relative allows you to "load a file that is relative to the file containing the require_relative statement". With require, ./ indicates a path that is relative to your current working directory. – Ajedi32 Nov 14 '14 at 15:58
  • 12
    I think it's more important to note that require str will always search through directories in $LOAD_PATH. You should use require_relative when the file you need to load exists somewhere relative to the file that calls for the loading. Reserve require for "external" dependencies. – rthbound Sep 30 '15 at 6:16
84

require_relative is a convenient subset of require

require_relative('path')

equals:

require(File.expand_path('path', File.dirname(__FILE__)))

if __FILE__ is defined, or it raises LoadError otherwise.

This implies that:

  • require_relative 'a' and require_relative './a' require relative to the current file (__FILE__).

    This is what you want to use when requiring inside your library, since you don't want the result to depend on the current directory of the caller.

  • eval('require_relative("a.rb")') raises LoadError because __FILE__ is not defined inside eval.

    This is why you can't use require_relative in RSpec tests, which get evaled.

The following operations are only possible with require:

  • require './a.rb' requires relative to the current directory

  • require 'a.rb' uses the search path ($LOAD_PATH) to require. It does not find files relative to current directory or path.

    This is not possible with require_relative because the docs say that path search only happens when "the filename does not resolve to an absolute path" (i.e. starts with / or ./ or ../), which is always the case for File.expand_path.

The following operation is possible with both, but you will want to use require as it is shorter and more efficient:

  • require '/a.rb' and require_relative '/a.rb' both require the absolute path.

Reading the source

When the docs are not clear, I recommend that you take a look at the sources (toggle source in the docs). In some cases, it helps to understand what is going on.

require:

VALUE rb_f_require(VALUE obj, VALUE fname) {
  return rb_require_safe(fname, rb_safe_level());
}

require_relative:

VALUE rb_f_require_relative(VALUE obj, VALUE fname) {
    VALUE base = rb_current_realfilepath();
    if (NIL_P(base)) {
        rb_loaderror("cannot infer basepath");
    }
    base = rb_file_dirname(base);
    return rb_require_safe(rb_file_absolute_path(fname, base), rb_safe_level());
}

This allows us to conclude that

require_relative('path')

is the same as:

require(File.expand_path('path', File.dirname(__FILE__)))

because:

rb_file_absolute_path   =~ File.expand_path
rb_file_dirname1        =~ File.dirname
rb_current_realfilepath =~ __FILE__
74

From Ruby API:

require_relative complements the builtin method require by allowing you to load a file that is relative to the file containing the require_relative statement.

When you use require to load a file, you are usually accessing functionality that has been properly installed, and made accessible, in your system. require does not offer a good solution for loading files within the project’s code. This may be useful during a development phase, for accessing test data, or even for accessing files that are "locked" away inside a project, not intended for outside use.

For example, if you have unit test classes in the "test" directory, and data for them under the test "test/data" directory, then you might use a line like this in a test case:

require_relative "data/customer_data_1" 

Since neither "test" nor "test/data" are likely to be in Ruby’s library path (and for good reason), a normal require won’t find them. require_relative is a good solution for this particular problem.

You may include or omit the extension (.rb or .so) of the file you are loading.

path must respond to to_str.

You can find the documentation at http://extensions.rubyforge.org/rdoc/classes/Kernel.html

43

Summary

Use require for installed gems

Use require_relative for local files

require uses your $LOAD_PATH to find the files.
require_relative uses the current location of the file using the statement


require

Require relies on you having installed (e.g. gem install [package]) a package somewhere on your system for that functionality.

When using require you can use the "./" format for a file in the current directory, e.g. require "./my_file" but that is not a common or recommended practice and you should use require_relative instead.

require_relative

This simply means include the file 'relative to the location of the file with the require_relative statement'. I generally recommend that files should be "within" the current directory tree as opposed to "up", e.g. don't use

require_relative '../../../filename'

(up 3 directory levels) within the file system because that tends to create unnecessary and brittle dependencies. However in some cases if you are already 'deep' within a directory tree then "up and down" another directory tree branch may be necessary. More simply perhaps, don't use require_relative for files outside of this repository (assuming you are using git which is largely a de-facto standard at this point, late 2018).

Note that require_relative uses the current directory of the file with the require_relative statement (so not necessarily your current directory that you are using the command from). This keeps the require_relative path "stable" as it always be relative to the file requiring it in the same way.

  • Extensive re-write in September 2018 reflecting a much better understanding of what and why to use – Michael Durrant Sep 7 '18 at 14:02
  • Oct 2018 - continuing to tweak for ever more clarity – Michael Durrant Oct 6 '18 at 16:13
23

The top answers are correct, but deeply technical. For those newer to the Ruby--

  • require_relative will most likely be used to bring in code from another file that you wrote.

for example, what if you have data in ~/my-project/data.rb and you want to include that in ~/my-project/solution.rb? in solution.rb you would add require_relative 'data'.

it is important to note these files do not need to be in the same directory. require_relative '../../folder1/folder2/data' is also valid.

  • require will most likely be used to bring in code from a library someone else wrote.

for example, what if you want to use one of the helper functions provided in the active_support library? you'll need to install the gem with gem install activesupport and then in the file require 'active_support'.

require 'active_support/all'
"FooBar".underscore

Said differently--

  • require_relative requires a file specifically pointed to relative to the file that calls it.

  • require requires a file included in the $LOAD_PATH.

14

I just saw the RSpec's code has some comment on require_relative being O(1) constant and require being O(N) linear. So probably the difference is that require_relative is the preferred one than require.

  • Interesting. I landed here looking for info on a speed comparison. My thinking was that require_relative was faster because the loader doesn't have to traverse the load path in search of the file. Essentially, require_relative provides a direct link. – Clint Pachl Jan 29 '15 at 23:53
  • Early disscussion about require_relative speed and the RSpec changelog. – Clint Pachl Jan 30 '15 at 0:06
1

I want to add that when using windows you can use require './1.rb' if the script is run local or from a mapped network drive but when run from an UNC \servername\sharename\folder path you need to use require_relative './1.rb' I don't mingle in the discussion which to use for other reasons.

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