21

TLDR: How to get headers for the output numpy array from the sklearn.preprocessing.PolynomialFeatures() function?


Let's say I have the following code...

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from sklearn import preprocessing as pp

a = np.ones(3)
b = np.ones(3) * 2
c = np.ones(3) * 3

input_df = pd.DataFrame([a,b,c])
input_df = input_df.T
input_df.columns=['a', 'b', 'c']

input_df

    a   b   c
0   1   2   3
1   1   2   3
2   1   2   3

poly = pp.PolynomialFeatures(2)
output_nparray = poly.fit_transform(input_df)
print output_nparray

[[ 1.  1.  2.  3.  1.  2.  3.  4.  6.  9.]
 [ 1.  1.  2.  3.  1.  2.  3.  4.  6.  9.]
 [ 1.  1.  2.  3.  1.  2.  3.  4.  6.  9.]]

How can I get that 3x10 matrix/ output_nparray to carry over the a,b,c labels how they relate to the data above?

31

scikit-learn 0.18 added a nifty get_feature_names() method!

>> input_df.columns
Index(['a', 'b', 'c'], dtype='object')

>> poly.fit_transform(input_df)
array([[ 1.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  6.,  9.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  6.,  9.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  6.,  9.]])

>> poly.get_feature_names(input_df.columns)
['1', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'a^2', 'a b', 'a c', 'b^2', 'b c', 'c^2']

Note you have to provide it with the columns names, since sklearn doesn't read it off from the DataFrame by itself.

23

Working example, all in one line (I assume "readability" is not the goal here):

target_feature_names = ['x'.join(['{}^{}'.format(pair[0],pair[1]) for pair in tuple if pair[1]!=0]) for tuple in [zip(input_df.columns,p) for p in poly.powers_]]
output_df = pd.DataFrame(output_nparray, columns = target_feature_names)

Update: as @OmerB pointed out, now you can use the get_feature_names method:

>> poly.get_feature_names(input_df.columns)
['1', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'a^2', 'a b', 'a c', 'b^2', 'b c', 'c^2']
3

This works:

def PolynomialFeatures_labeled(input_df,power):
    '''Basically this is a cover for the sklearn preprocessing function. 
    The problem with that function is if you give it a labeled dataframe, it ouputs an unlabeled dataframe with potentially
    a whole bunch of unlabeled columns. 

    Inputs:
    input_df = Your labeled pandas dataframe (list of x's not raised to any power) 
    power = what order polynomial you want variables up to. (use the same power as you want entered into pp.PolynomialFeatures(power) directly)

    Ouput:
    Output: This function relies on the powers_ matrix which is one of the preprocessing function's outputs to create logical labels and 
    outputs a labeled pandas dataframe   
    '''
    poly = pp.PolynomialFeatures(power)
    output_nparray = poly.fit_transform(input_df)
    powers_nparray = poly.powers_

    input_feature_names = list(input_df.columns)
    target_feature_names = ["Constant Term"]
    for feature_distillation in powers_nparray[1:]:
        intermediary_label = ""
        final_label = ""
        for i in range(len(input_feature_names)):
            if feature_distillation[i] == 0:
                continue
            else:
                variable = input_feature_names[i]
                power = feature_distillation[i]
                intermediary_label = "%s^%d" % (variable,power)
                if final_label == "":         #If the final label isn't yet specified
                    final_label = intermediary_label
                else:
                    final_label = final_label + " x " + intermediary_label
        target_feature_names.append(final_label)
    output_df = pd.DataFrame(output_nparray, columns = target_feature_names)
    return output_df

output_df = PolynomialFeatures_labeled(input_df,2)
output_df

    Constant Term   a^1 b^1 c^1 a^2 a^1 x b^1   a^1 x c^1   b^2 b^1 x c^1   c^2
0               1   1   2   3   1           2           3   4           6   9
1               1   1   2   3   1           2           3   4           6   9
2               1   1   2   3   1           2           3   4           6   9
0

The get_feature_names() method is good, but it returns all variables as 'x1', 'x2', 'x1 x2', ...etc. Below is a function to quickly transform the get_feature_names() output to a list of column names formatted as 'Col_1', 'Col_2', 'Col_1 x Col_2':

IN:

def PolynomialFeatureNames(sklearn_feature_name_output, df):
"""
This function takes the output from the .get_feature_names() method on the PolynomialFeatures 
instance and replaces values with df column names to return output such as 'Col_1 x Col_2'

sklearn_feature_name_output: The list object returned when calling .get_feature_names() on the PolynomialFeatures object
df: Pandas dataframe with correct column names
"""
import re
cols = df.columns.tolist()
feat_map = {'x'+str(num):cat for num, cat in enumerate(cols)}
feat_string = ','.join(sklearn_feature_name_output)
for k,v in feat_map.items():
    feat_string = re.sub(fr"\b{k}\b",v,feat_string)
return feat_string.replace(" "," x ").split(',')  

interaction = PolynomialFeatures(degree=2)
X_inter = interaction.fit_transform(input_df)

names = PolynomialFeatureNames(interaction.get_feature_names(),input_df)

print(pd.DataFrame(X_inter, columns= names))

OUT:

            1       a       b       c     a^2   a x b   a x c     b^2   b x c  \
0 1.00000 1.00000 2.00000 3.00000 1.00000 2.00000 3.00000 4.00000 6.00000   
1 1.00000 1.00000 2.00000 3.00000 1.00000 2.00000 3.00000 4.00000 6.00000   
2 1.00000 1.00000 2.00000 3.00000 1.00000 2.00000 3.00000 4.00000 6.00000   

      c^2  
0 9.00000  
1 9.00000  
2 9.00000

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