2

I am aware of this post: TextBox FontFamily Binding, looks similar to my question, but my case is much simpler, I want to bind the FontFamily attribute of a TextBox control to a ComboBox, when the value of the ComboBox is changed, the TextBox's content changes accordingly. I am not using VM or Dependency Property, I followed this tutorial: https://dotnetstories.wordpress.com/2011/07/31/using-type-converters-in-wpf/

And came up with:

<Window x:Class="NumericControlTest.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:NumericControlTest"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">

<Window.Resources>
    <local:FontFamilyConversions x:Key="FontFamilyConversions" />
</Window.Resources>

<DockPanel>

    <ComboBox  DockPanel.Dock="Top" x:Name="Fonttype" >
        <ComboBoxItem IsSelected="True">Arial</ComboBoxItem>
        <ComboBoxItem>Batang</ComboBoxItem>
        <ComboBoxItem>BatangChe</ComboBoxItem>
        <ComboBoxItem>Gungsuh</ComboBoxItem>
        <ComboBoxItem>GungsuhChe</ComboBoxItem>
        <ComboBoxItem>Courier New</ComboBoxItem>
    </ComboBox>
    <TextBox x:Name="editor" FontSize="16" FontFamily="{Binding Path=SelectedValue, ElementName=Fonttype, Mode=OneWay, Converter={StaticResource FontFamilyConversions}}" >

    </TextBox>
</DockPanel>

using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace NumericControlTest
{
    class FontFamilyConversions : IValueConverter
    {
        public object Convert(object value, System.Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            FontFamily fontfamily = new FontFamily("Verdana");
            if (value != null)
            {
                fontfamily = new FontFamily(value.ToString());
            }
            return fontfamily;
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, System.Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

But it doesn't work, after I change the ComboBox's value, nothing happens.

Thanks for your time.

5

A breakpoint on return fontfamily; would show that you're not getting what you expect from value.ToString(). You'll need to get the Content from the ComboBoxItem:

public object Convert(object value, System.Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
{
    FontFamily fontfamily = new FontFamily("Verdana");
    ComboBoxItem selectedFont = value as ComboBoxItem;
    if (selectedFont != null)
    {
        fontfamily = new FontFamily(selectedFont.Content.ToString());
    }
    return fontfamily;
}

You can avoid the converter all together by adding the <FontFamily> objects directly to the ComboBox:

<ComboBox  DockPanel.Dock="Top" x:Name="Fonttype" SelectedIndex="0">
    <FontFamily>Arial</FontFamily>
    <FontFamily>Segoe UI</FontFamily>            
</ComboBox>

And then bind to SelectedValue without a converter.

FontFamily="{Binding Path=SelectedValue, ElementName=Fonttype, Mode=OneWay}"

Or perhaps you'd like to automatically get a list of installed Fonts:

<ComboBox  DockPanel.Dock="Top" x:Name="Fonttype" ItemsSource="{x:Static Fonts.SystemFontFamilies}" SelectedIndex="0" />

Although it's unlikely that SystemFontFamilies will be sorted, so you'd need to use a CollectionViewSource to sort.

4
  • Really interesting, before I asked the question, I actually tried to output the expression value.ToString(), and I knew it was "System.Windows.Media.FontFamily: Arial", but I also added a break point on return fontamily, exactly as you said, and I found it was correct, as expected. Well, that's somehow strange, though. The most important thing is your suggestion works, thank you so much. – VincentZHANG Apr 20 '16 at 6:49
  • @VincentZHANG expanded the answer a bit – bdimag Apr 20 '16 at 15:19
  • That is a great job, thanks so much. However, adding <FontFamily> as <ComboBox> immediate children is beyond my understanding capability. So, that means <FontFamily> is recognized as a valid tag in XAML, right? When XAML being compiled, it will be converted a FontFamily object? On the other hand, can I add whatever class to <ComboBox>? like <Brush>AliceBlue</Brush> and then bind this ComboBox to a TextBox's Foreground attribute. – VincentZHANG Apr 22 '16 at 22:23
  • @VincentZHANG Yes, you can. Depending on the object, you may need to specify a DataTemplate so that it can render appropriately. With colors, for example, you may want to show a Rectangle filled with the color and a TextBlock with the color name. The template is set within <ComboBox.ItemTemplate> which also lives within the <ComboBox>.. – bdimag Apr 23 '16 at 2:10
1

It is not necessary to use a binding converter.

Instead you may assign the FontFamily to the Tag property of each ComboBoxItem. This would also enable you to use arbitrary texts for the ComboBox items:

<ComboBox x:Name="fontFamilyComboBox" SelectedValuePath="Tag">
    <ComboBoxItem Content="Arial">
        <ComboBoxItem.Tag>
            <FontFamily>Arial</FontFamily>
        </ComboBoxItem.Tag>
    </ComboBoxItem>
    <ComboBoxItem Content="Courier">
        <ComboBoxItem.Tag>
            <FontFamily>Courier New</FontFamily>
        </ComboBoxItem.Tag>
    </ComboBoxItem>
</ComboBox>

<TextBox Text="Hello, World."
         FontFamily="{Binding SelectedValue, ElementName=fontFamilyComboBox}"/>

The SelectedValue binding on the FontFamily property directly returns the ComboBox's Tag property, because SelectedValuePath="Tag" was set on the ComboBox. Without that the FontFamily binding could also be written like this:

<TextBox Text="Hello, World."
         FontFamily="{Binding SelectedItem.Tag, ElementName=fontFamilyComboBox}"/>
4
  • Thank you, Clemens, does this approach work with <Brush> for Foreground as well? – VincentZHANG Apr 22 '16 at 22:27
  • @VincentZHANG Besides that you could simply try it, what makes you think it wouldn't work? – Clemens Apr 22 '16 at 22:33
  • Yes, good point, sorry for being unclear. my question is rather the rule behind the scene, is there any reference about that mechanism? – VincentZHANG Apr 22 '16 at 22:45
  • There is no special mechanism involved. You can put anything into the Tag property (which is of type object). So anything you can create in XAML can be put into it in XAML. If you then bind to the Tag property as in FontFamily="{Binding SelectedItem.Tag ...} the types must match at runtime. – Clemens Apr 22 '16 at 22:49

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