54

I have a scenario where I am returning a promise. The promise basically give the response of a ajax request.

On rejecting the promise it shows an error dialog that there is a server error.

What I want to do is when the response code is 401, I neither want to resolve the promise nor reject it(cause it shows error dialog). I want to simply redirect to the login page.

My code looks something like this

function makeRequest(ur,params) {

    return new Promise(function(resolve,reject) {

        fetch(url,params)
        .then((response) => {

            let status = response.status;

            if (status >= 200 && status < 300) {
                response.json().then((data) => {
                    resolve(data);
                })
            }
            else {
                if(status === 401) {
                    redirectToLoginPage();
                }
                else {
                    response.json().then((error) => {

                        if (!error.message) {
                            error.message = constants.SERVER_ERROR;
                        }
                        reject({status,error});
                    })    
                }
            }

        })
    });
}

As you can see if the status is 401, I am redirecting to login page. Promise is neither resolved nor rejected.

Is this code OK? Or is there any better way to accomplish this.

Thanks.

76

A promise is just an object with properties in Javascript. There's no magic to it. So failing to resolve or reject a promise just fails to ever change the state from "pending" to anything else. This doesn't cause any fundamental problem in Javascript because a promise is just a regular Javascript object. The promise will still get garbage collected (even if still pending) if no code keeps a reference to the promise.

The real consequence here is what does that mean to the consumer of the promise if its state is never changed? Any .then() or .catch() listeners for resolve or reject transitions will never get called. Most code that uses promises expects them to resolve or reject at some point in the future (that's why promises are used in the first place). If they don't, then that code generally never gets to finish its work.

It's possible that you could have some other code that finishes the work for that task and the promise is just abandoned without ever doing its thing. There's no internal problem in Javascript if you do it that way, but it is not how promises were designed to work and is generally not how the consumer of promises expect them to work.

As you can see if the status is 401, I am redirecting to login page. Promise is neither resolved nor rejected.

Is this code OK? Or is there any better way to accomplish this.

In this particular case, it's all OK and a redirect is a somewhat special and unique case. A redirect to a new browser page will completely clear the current page state (including all Javascript state) so it's perfectly fine to take a shortcut with the redirect and just leave other things unresolved. The system will completely reinitialize your Javascript state when the new page starts to load so any promises that were still pending will get cleaned up.

  • 2
    As you mentioned, A redirect to a new browser page will completely clear the current page state (including all Javascript state). But what will happen if I am redirecting in a single page app. I am using ReactJS. So there will be no new browser page, just a different view. Whether it's perfectly fine to take a shortcut in that case with the redirect and just leave other things unresolved. – Aniket Apr 20 '16 at 9:11
  • @Aniket - Then that's a different case which your question does not describe. You will have to make sure things are cleaned up properly so you don't have any memory leaks. I have no idea whether there would be an issue with this in react or not. Next time please put this type of information in your question. – jfriend00 Apr 20 '16 at 15:51
  • Make sure you don't have references to the reject and resolve functions, and not just stop referencing the promise. Then, GC should step in. Otherwise, if your code still references resolve for example, then the Promise will have to stick around in case your code ever calls resolve(). Here's an example of a Web API that can leak Promises if not careful: github.com/w3c/webcomponents/issues/674 – trusktr Jan 28 '18 at 3:13
7

Always resolve or reject the promise. Even if you're not using the result right now, despite this working, it's a very bad practice to get into because promises love to swallow errors, and the more complex your code becomes, the harder it will be to find the few places where you didn't explicitly complete a promise (plus you won't even know whether that's the problem).

4

I think the "what happens if we don't resolve reject" has been answered fine - it's your choice whether to add a .then or a .catch.

However, Is this code OK? Or is there any better way to accomplish this. I would say there are two things:

You are wrapping a Promise in new Promise when it is not necessary and the fetch call can fail, you should act on that so that your calling method doesn't sit and wait for a Promise which will never be resolved.

Here's an example (I think this should work for your business logic, not 100% sure):

const constants = {
  SERVER_ERROR: "500 Server Error"
};
function makeRequest(url,params) {
  // fetch already returns a Promise itself
  return fetch(url,params)
        .then((response) => {

            let status = response.status;

            // If status is forbidden, redirect to Login & return nothing,
            // indicating the end of the Promise chain
            if(status === 401) {
              redirectToLoginPage();
              return;
            }
            // If status is success, return a JSON Promise
            if(status >= 200 && status < 300) {
              return response.json();
            }
            // If status is a failure, get the JSON Promise,
            // map the message & status, then Reject the promise
            return response.json()
              .then(json => {
                if (!json.message) {
                    json.message = constants.SERVER_ERROR;
                }
                return Promise.reject({status, error: json.message});
              })
        });
}
// This can now be used as:
makeRequest("http://example", {})
  .then(json => {
    if(typeof json === "undefined") {
      // Redirect request occurred
    }
    console.log("Success:", json);
  })
  .catch(error => {
    console.log("Error:", error.status, error.message);
  })

By contrast, calling your code using:

makeRequest("http://example", {})
  .then(info => console.log("info", info))
  .catch(err => console.log("error", err));

Will not log anything because the call to http://example will fail, but the catch handler will never execute.

  • I just wanted to avoid if(typeof json === "undefined") { // Redirect request occurred } The reason being makeRequest is called by many other functions and I have to make that check in every function that calls it. – Aniket Apr 20 '16 at 9:17
2

It works and isn't really a problem, except when a caller of makeRequest expects of promise to fulfil. So, you're breaking the contract there.

Instead, you could defer the promise, or (in this case) reject with status code/error.

2

As others stated it's true that it's not really an issue if you don't resolve/reject a promise. Anyway I would solve your problem a bit different:

function makeRequest(ur,params) {

    return new Promise(function(resolve,reject) {

        fetch(url,params)
        .then((response) => {

            let status = response.status;

            if (status >= 200 && status < 300) {
                response.json().then((data) => {
                    resolve(data);
                })
            }
            else {
                reject(response);
            }
        })
    });
}

makeRequest().then(function success(data) {
   //...
}, function error(response) {
    if (response.status === 401) {
        redirectToLoginPage();
    }
    else {
        response.json().then((error) => {
            if (!error.message) {
                error.message = constants.SERVER_ERROR;
            }

            //do sth. with error
        });
    } 
});

That means I would reject every bad response state and then handle this in your error handler of your makeRequest.

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