7

I was wondering, why the following way of code (Already commented out) will cause
C2102: '&' requires l-value

Is there a better way to avoid using tmp variable?

class a {
private:
    int *dummy;
public:
    int* get_dummy() const {
        return dummy;
    }
};

int main()
{
    a aa;

    // error C2102: '&' requires l-value
    //int** me = &(aa.get_dummy());

    // OK!
    int *tmp = aa.get_dummy();
    int** me = &(tmp);
}
4

Because a::get_dummy() returns a unnamed temporary object (int pointer).
Object returned by function sit ontop of the stack frame and it is meaningless to get its address since it might be invalid after expression ends.

  • Same issue as Luca's answer. tmp is a stack object! – Billy ONeal Sep 9 '10 at 7:22
  • dummy is not a temporary object or a local object. – Naveen Sep 9 '10 at 7:22
  • @Naveen: Yes, that is true. But the answer doesn't say "unnamed temporary" (which lives until the end of it's full expression), it says "stack object" which typically means an object in "automatic" storage which lives until the end of it's scope. – Billy ONeal Sep 9 '10 at 7:23
  • @Billy, added the "unnamed" onto my answer. but i dont see "stack object" in my reply that you are referring to. – YeenFei Sep 9 '10 at 7:29
  • 1
    @YeenFei: Stack object is implied by "top of the stack frame" and "out of scope". tmp is also invalid when it goes out of scope. Unnamed compiler temporaries have absolutely nothing to do with scope. They live until the end of their owning full expression. – Billy ONeal Sep 9 '10 at 7:33
7

You could instead define:

int **get_dummy() ... return &dummy;

You can think of an r-value as an expression, essentially, whereas an l-value is an actual object. Expressions don't have addresses, and even if they did, it's hard to imagine what good the address would be. It's easy to understand how the address of an object can be useful.

It's a bit hard to understand an issue like this abstractly. The very best way to develop an understanding of pointers and compiled languages is to learn assembly language.

  • 1
    +1 for suggesting a reasonable solution to the problem. – Billy ONeal Sep 9 '10 at 7:14
  • I do not have access to the get_dummy source code. – Cheok Yan Cheng Sep 9 '10 at 7:16
  • Hmm, you might be able to use &aa, but otherwise, why do you want the indirect pointer? Is there no API to change the pointer? Do you even want to change it? It's dangerous to take the address of a local variable... – DigitalRoss Sep 9 '10 at 7:21
  • be it global, member or local variable, as long as its lifetime exceed the referrer, the "danger" of dangling pointer is non-existent. – YeenFei Sep 9 '10 at 8:24
  • @YeenFei, sure, but returning a local's address is an exotic operation in any language. When people don't fully understand the run-time reality, staying on the more-obviously-safe side is probably a good idea. – DigitalRoss Apr 12 '16 at 0:35
4

No.

What address would me contain otherwise? Here you gave it the address of tmp -- but if you replace it with int** me = &aa.get_dummy();, where would it point?

There's no meaningful answer to that question, so the standard requires that the argument of & be an lvalue.

  • where would it point? - Isn't it point to the address of dummy instance? – Cheok Yan Cheng Sep 9 '10 at 7:18
  • @Yan: No. The function returns the address (or value) stored by dummy, not dummy itself. – Billy ONeal Sep 9 '10 at 7:18
  • 1
    @Yan: You could return dummy by reference, e.g. int*& get_dummy. – Puppy Sep 9 '10 at 8:13
0

The & operator must be applied to an lvalue. When the call aa.get_dummy() is not assigned to a variable, its return value is only put on the stack, so it would be silly (and erroneous) to get the address of a stack item.

  • 2
    Err.. tmp is a stack item. – Billy ONeal Sep 9 '10 at 7:13
  • I meant unnamed stack item – Luca Martini Sep 9 '10 at 8:54
0

The compiler is right, according to ISO C++ § 5.3.1.3:

The result of the unary & operator is a pointer to its operand. The operand shall be an lvalue or a qualified-id.

In other words, you can take an address of anything that has a name.

Values returned from functions by-value have no name and are often returned via a register. So there is no "address" to speak of as the value is not residing in memory!

One could argue that the compiler could be smarter, detect this and store the value on the stack for the duration of the expression in which the address is used. But that is error-prone (you can "leak" a pointer to outside the expression), and would clearly be an extension of the standard (i.e. not guaranteed to be compatible). So MSVC simply prohibits it.

Entertainingly, the compiler is that smart when it comes to a reference to an rvalue. But there is no such functionality for a pointer to an rvalue.

To answer your question: try to minimize taking addresses of stuff; taking an address of a variable prevents the optimizer from putting it into a register. But if you have to, return a reference instead:

class a {
private:
    int dummy;
public:
    int get_dummy() const {
        return dummy;
    }
    int& get_dummy() {
        return dummy;
    }
};

int main()
{
    a aa;

    int* me = &(aa.get_dummy());
}

Note that having a const get_dummy() is not strictly needed, but will help the optimizer in rvalue contexts.

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