394

I need to increment a date value by one day in JavaScript.

For example, I have a date value 2010-09-11 and I need to store the date of the next day in a JavaScript variable.

How can I increment a date by a day?

15 Answers 15

727

Three options for you:

1. Using just JavaScript's Date object (no libraries):

My previous answer for #1 was wrong (it added 24 hours, failing to account for transitions to and from daylight saving time; Clever Human pointed out that it would fail with November 7, 2010 in the Eastern timezone). Instead, Jigar's answer is the correct way to do this without a library:

var tomorrow = new Date();
tomorrow.setDate(tomorrow.getDate() + 1);

This works even for the last day of a month (or year), because the JavaScript date object is smart about rollover:

var lastDayOf2015 = new Date(2015, 11, 31);
snippet.log("Last day of 2015: " + lastDayOf2015.toISOString());
var nextDay = new Date(+lastDayOf2015);
var dateValue = nextDay.getDate() + 1;
snippet.log("Setting the 'date' part to " + dateValue);
nextDay.setDate(dateValue);
snippet.log("Resulting date: " + nextDay.toISOString());
<!-- Script provides the `snippet` object, see http://meta.stackexchange.com/a/242144/134069 -->
<script src="//tjcrowder.github.io/simple-snippets-console/snippet.js"></script>

(This answer is currently accepted, so I can't delete it. Before it was accepted I suggested to the OP they accept Jigar's, but perhaps they accepted this one for items #2 or #3 on the list.)

2. Using MomentJS:

var today = moment();
var tomorrow = moment(today).add(1, 'days');

(Beware that add modifies the instance you call it on, rather than returning a new instance, so today.add(1, 'days') would modify today. That's why we start with a cloning op on var tomorrow = ....)

3. Using DateJS, but it hasn't been updated in a long time:

var today = new Date(); // Or Date.today()
var tomorrow = today.add(1).day();
  • But I have date 2010-09-11 in a variable by using document.getElementById("arrival_date").value,it shows invalid date – Santanu Sep 9 '10 at 7:37
  • 1
    @santanu: That's a completely different problem: Date parsing (getting a date by interpreting a string). If that format is static, you can parse it yourself and feed the results into the Date constructor (new Date(year, month, date)); see section 15.9.2.1 of the specification; if you want to accept a range of formats, definitely take a look at DateJS. – T.J. Crowder Sep 9 '10 at 8:12
  • 1
    @santanu: Just to follow-on the above: Some browsers may successfully parse that format with Date.parse (which returns a number of milliseconds you can then feed into new Date(ms)). But beware, that can vary from browser to browser. Until recently, implementations could do just about anything they wanted to in Date.parse. The new 5th edition specification now has a minimum format that must be accepted, but I wouldn't count on that yet. – T.J. Crowder Sep 9 '10 at 8:18
  • I just wanted to add a second to a Date instance; this worked for me x = new Date(); x2 = new Date(x.getTime() + 1000), where 1000 is a millisecond increment. – berto Dec 5 '14 at 19:42
  • 1
    @piavgh: There's nothing wrong with the first solution, it's just how you're using it. Date objects are mutable. You're storing the same Date object three times in the array. If you want three different Date objects, you have to create three objects: var unavailableDates = []; for (var d = new Date('2017-05-11'); d < new Date('2017-05-13'); d.setDate(d.getDate() + 1)) { unavailableDates.push(new Date(+d)); } – T.J. Crowder May 12 '17 at 6:54
167
var myDate = new Date();

//add a day to the date
myDate.setDate(myDate.getDate() + 1);
  • But I have date 2010-09-11 in a variable by using document.getElementById("arrival_date").value,it shows invalid date – Santanu Sep 9 '10 at 7:35
  • 1
    @sanatu: In that case you need to format the string in a way that the browser will accept. Chrome accepts new Date("2009-09-11") but Firefox doesn't. I think most browsers accept new Date("2009/09/11") so an easy solution would be var arrivalDate = document.getElementById('arival_date').value; var dayAfter = new Date(arrival_date.replace(/-/g, '/')); dayAfter.setDate(dayAfter.getDate()+1);. – David Hedlund Sep 9 '10 at 7:43
  • 5
    A more solid approach than replacing - with / and hoping that browsers will accept it, would be to divide the string into parts: var dateParts = arrivalDate.split('-'); var y = parseInt(dateParts[0], 10); var m = parseInt(dateParts[1], 10); var d = parseInt(dateParts[2], 10); var dayAfter = new Date(y, m-1, d+1); Note that we're using m-1 here, because javascript months are enum values (January being 0, not 1), and d+1 because we're doing the incrementation already in the initial assignment (it'll automatically correct for Feb 29th, etc.) – David Hedlund Sep 9 '10 at 7:50
33

None of the examples in this answer seem to work with Daylight Saving Time adjustment days. On those days, the number of hours in a day are not 24 (they are 23 or 25, depending on if you are "springing forward" or "falling back".)

The below AddDays javascript function accounts for daylight saving time:

function addDays(date, amount) {
  var tzOff = date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000,
      t = date.getTime(),
      d = new Date(),
      tzOff2;

  t += (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24) * amount;
  d.setTime(t);

  tzOff2 = d.getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000;
  if (tzOff != tzOff2) {
    var diff = tzOff2 - tzOff;
    t += diff;
    d.setTime(t);
  }

  return d;
}

Here are the tests I used to test the function:

    var d = new Date(2010,10,7);
    var d2 = AddDays(d, 1);
    document.write(d.toString() + "<br />" + d2.toString());

    d = new Date(2010,10,8);
    d2 = AddDays(d, -1)
    document.write("<hr /><br />" +  d.toString() + "<br />" + d2.toString());

    d = new Date('Sun Mar 27 2011 01:59:00 GMT+0100 (CET)');
    d2 = AddDays(d, 1)
    document.write("<hr /><br />" +  d.toString() + "<br />" + d2.toString());

    d = new Date('Sun Mar 28 2011 01:59:00 GMT+0100 (CET)');
    d2 = AddDays(d, -1)
    document.write("<hr /><br />" +  d.toString() + "<br />" + d2.toString());
26

The easiest way is to convert to milliseconds and add 1000*60*60*24 milliseconds e.g.:

var tomorrow = new Date(today.getTime()+1000*60*60*24);
  • I love this one, integer representation rule. – exebook Feb 24 '17 at 10:55
  • This is the best answer. Can increment/decrement easily as much days as requested; just by multiplying 1000*60*60*24 x DaysToBeAdded – Khalil Khalaf Jul 12 '17 at 16:00
20

Tomorrow in one line in pure JS but it's ugly !

new Date(new Date().setDate(new Date().getDate() + 1))

Here is the result :

Thu Oct 12 2017 08:53:30 GMT+0200 (Romance Summer Time)
12

You first need to parse your string before following the other people's suggestion:

var dateString = "2010-09-11";
var myDate = new Date(dateString);

//add a day to the date
myDate.setDate(myDate.getDate() + 1);

If you want it back in the same format again you will have to do that "manually":

var y = myDate.getFullYear(),
    m = myDate.getMonth() + 1, // january is month 0 in javascript
    d = myDate.getDate();
var pad = function(val) { var str = val.toString(); return (str.length < 2) ? "0" + str : str};
dateString = [y, pad(m), pad(d)].join("-");

But I suggest getting Date.js as mentioned in other replies, that will help you alot.

4

Getting the next 5 days:

var date = new Date(),
d = date.getDate(),
m = date.getMonth(),
y = date.getFullYear();


for(i=0; i < 5; i++){
var curdate = new Date(y, m, d+i)
console.log(curdate)
}
  • Tried the above answers but in vain. Your code worked like a charm. Thanks! – dimmat Sep 20 '18 at 10:06
3

Two methods:

1:

var a = new Date()
// no_of_days is an integer value
var b = new Date(a.setTime(a.getTime() + no_of_days * 86400000)

2: Similar to the previous method

var a = new Date()
// no_of_days is an integer value
var b = new Date(a.setDate(a.getDate() + no_of_days)
2

Get the string value of the date using the dateObj.toJSON() method Ref: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date/toJSON Slice the date from the returned value and then increment by the number of days you want.

var currentdate = new Date();
currentdate.setDate(currentdate.getDate() + 1);
var tomorrow = currentdate.toJSON().slice(0,10);
2
 Date.prototype.AddDays = function (days) {
    days = parseInt(days, 10);
    return new Date(this.valueOf() + 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * days);
}

Example

var dt = new Date();
console.log(dt.AddDays(-30));
console.log(dt.AddDays(-10));
console.log(dt.AddDays(-1));
console.log(dt.AddDays(0));
console.log(dt.AddDays(1));
console.log(dt.AddDays(10));
console.log(dt.AddDays(30));

Result

2017-09-03T15:01:37.213Z
2017-09-23T15:01:37.213Z
2017-10-02T15:01:37.213Z
2017-10-03T15:01:37.213Z
2017-10-04T15:01:37.213Z
2017-10-13T15:01:37.213Z
2017-11-02T15:01:37.213Z
  • Your code does not work. I have tried it with the first console.log() and it says: dt.AddDays() is not a function. – Adrian2895 May 20 at 11:59
1

Not entirelly sure if it is a BUG(Tested Firefox 32.0.3 and Chrome 38.0.2125.101), but the following code will fail on Brazil (-3 GMT):

Date.prototype.shiftDays = function(days){    
  days = parseInt(days, 10);
  this.setDate(this.getDate() + days);
  return this;
}

$date = new Date(2014, 9, 16,0,1,1);
$date.shiftDays(1);
console.log($date+"");
$date.shiftDays(1);
console.log($date+"");
$date.shiftDays(1);
console.log($date+"");
$date.shiftDays(1);
console.log($date+"");

Result:

Fri Oct 17 2014 00:01:01 GMT-0300
Sat Oct 18 2014 00:01:01 GMT-0300
Sat Oct 18 2014 23:01:01 GMT-0300
Sun Oct 19 2014 23:01:01 GMT-0200

Adding one Hour to the date, will make it work perfectly (but does not solve the problem).

$date = new Date(2014, 9, 16,0,1,1);

Result:

Fri Oct 17 2014 01:01:01 GMT-0300
Sat Oct 18 2014 01:01:01 GMT-0300
Sun Oct 19 2014 01:01:01 GMT-0200
Mon Oct 20 2014 01:01:01 GMT-0200
1

Results in a string representation of tomorrow's date. Use new Date() to get today's date, adding one day using Date.getDate() and Date.setDate(), and converting the Date object to a string.

  const tomorrow = () => {
      let t = new Date();
      t.setDate(t.getDate() + 1);
      return `${t.getFullYear()}-${String(t.getMonth() + 1).padStart(2, '0')}-${String(
        t.getDate()
      ).padStart(2, '0')}`;
    };
    tomorrow();
1

Incrementing date's year with vanilla js:

start_date_value = "01/01/2019"
var next_year = new Date(start_date_value);
next_year.setYear(next_year.getYear() + 1);
console.log(next_year.getYear()); //=> 2020

Just in case someone wants to increment other value than the date (day)

1

Via native JS, to add one day you may do following:

let date = new Date(); // today
date.setDate(date.getDate() + 1) // tomorrow

Another option is to use moment library:

const date = moment().add(14, "days").toDate()
  • 1
    Please explain what this code does. Add details about how it addresses the OP's problem. – Yash Sep 20 at 9:33
1

Timezone/daylight savings aware date increment for JavaScript dates:

function nextDay(date) {
    const sign = v => (v < 0 ? -1 : +1);
    const result = new Date(date.getTime());
    result.setDate(result.getDate() + 1);
    const offset = result.getTimezoneOffset();
    return new Date(result.getTime() + sign(offset) * offset * 60 * 1000);
}

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