17

I'm trying to come up a simple example for an operation that results in a rvalue.

This test case should have worked, but surprisingly (to me), the result of adding two ints is not an rvalue (reference). What am I missing here?

void test(int i, int j)
{
    // this assert should pass, but fails:
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(i + j), int&&>(), "i + j should be a rvalue"); 
    // this assert passed, but should fail:
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(i + j), int>(), "this assert should fail...");
}
  • It's just Plain Old Data. I don't think you can std::move an int.. – 0xbaadf00d Apr 21 '16 at 7:38
  • 6
    You can very much std::move an int and that's besides the point anyway, the OP is asking about the value category of i + j. – user703016 Apr 21 '16 at 7:40
  • 3
    Being an rvalue is not the same as being an rvalue reference. – Griwes Apr 21 '16 at 7:41
  • 1
    i+j is an rvalue – M.M Apr 21 '16 at 8:13
  • 2
    @M.M right, I understood that from the accepted answer. Basically I was using decltype wrong. I'll see if I can improve the title to match my actual problem, not what I was observing. – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 8:16
34

i + j is a prvalue expression,

A prvalue ("pure rvalue") expression is an expression that does not have identity and can be moved from.

a + b, a % b, a & b, a << b, and all other built-in arithmetic expressions;

not a xvalue,

An xvalue ("expiring value") expression is an expression that has identity and can be moved from.

And decltype specifier yields T for prvalue, not T&&.

a) if the value category of expression is xvalue, then decltype yields T&&;
b) if the value category of expression is lvalue, then decltype yields T&;
c) if the value category of expression is prvalue, then decltype yields T.

You can make it xvalue by std::move:

static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(std::move(i + j)), int&&>(), "std::move(i + j) is a xvalue then this static_assert won't fail"); 
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The paragraph about decltype is what I missed in the more general case. (Or, more generally speaking, the difference between the value categories and what references they bind to.) Thank you! – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 8:11
  • I clarified the question a bit now that I know what I got wrong. The difference is basically is a rvalue vs binds to a rvalue reference. I was expecting to check the second one, but did something else. Would you want to add that to your answer, or should I write my own self-accepted answer? (Since that would be the solution of my actual problem.) – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 8:22
  • @anderas I think it's fine to write your answer, based on your own aspect and understanding. – songyuanyao Apr 21 '16 at 8:24
  • Done! Not sure which answer should be the accepted one, though. Yours answers the question as written, while mine answers the underlying problem. – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 8:40
  • @anderas Fine, it's up to you, op. – songyuanyao Apr 21 '16 at 8:52
5

Based on @songyuanyao's Answer, I noticed that my mistake was checking the wrong thing: My intention was to check whether the result of i+j would bind to a rvalue reference, but I checked whether it is a rvalue reference.

decltype deduces the type based on the value category, not based on what reference type the value would bind to:

1) if the value category of expression is xvalue, then decltype yields T&&;
2) if the value category of expression is lvalue, then decltype yields T&;
3) if the value category of expression is prvalue, then decltype yields T.

As shown in the list, since C++11, rvalues don't exist as a distinct category on the lowest level. They are now a composite category containing both prvalues as well as xvalues. The question as written asks whether the expression is a rvalue reference and checks whether it is an xvalue.

From the list above, it is clear that i+j is a prvalue, so the third case applies. This explains why decltype(i + j) is int and not int&&. Both xvaluesand prvalues bind to rvalue references.

So by checking for whether i+j binds to a lvalue reference or a rvalue reference confirms that, indeed, it binds to a rvalue reference:

void foo(const int& f)
{
    std::cout << "binds to lvalue reference" << std::endl;
}

void foo(int&& f)
{
    std::cout << "binds to rvalue reference" << std::endl;
}

void test(int i, int j)
{
    foo(i); // lvalue -> lvalue ref

    foo(std::move(i)); // xvalue -> rvalue ref 
    // (std::move converts the argument to a rvalue reference and returns it as an xvalue)

    foo(i + j); // prvalue -> rvalue ref
}

In conclusion: i+j is not a rvalue reference, but it binds to one.

| improve this answer | |
  • Can you make an example that is able to fetch all three types? – Chiel Apr 21 '16 at 8:58
  • @Chiel, no, and that is the point that I tried to make with the distinction between the category and what a value binds to: There are only rvalue and lvalue references (not xvalue, lvalue and prvalue references). prvalues AND xvalues bind to rvalue references. – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 9:06
  • @Chiel unless you wanted me to show what values of these categories bind to. I added that to the sample. – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 9:11
  • Thanks. Can you explain me exactly what the std::move does here and what that means to i? – Chiel Apr 21 '16 at 9:16
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    @Chiel in this case, std::move does the same thing as always: It casts the argument to a rvalue reference and returns it as an xvalue (which in turn binds to a rvalue reference, causing the int&& overload to be selected. – anderas Apr 21 '16 at 9:19

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